Thank you so much, dear Anna Strout for taking so many lovely pictures!
• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop

• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


 

2023 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict

"The Urgency of Seeding Dignity:
Honoring 20 Years of Global Collaboration for Transforming Suffering Through Courageous and Compassionate Action"

The 20th Annual Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict hosted by the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR), Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City
and the 39th Annual HumanDHS Conference in total

Friday, December 8, 2023, 11.00 am – 4.00 pm New York Time
(Calculate your local time, Aotearoa/New Zealand one day ahead)

This was a hybrid conference with 30 people participating in person in Teachers College's Gottesman Libraries, room 306, and 127 participants from all over the world registered online

Those who were invited to participate in person were kindly asked to show their picture ID at the entrance of Teachers College and bring their printed invitation letter.
Columbia University, Teachers College (TC), Gottesman Libraries, 306 Russell Hall
525 West 120th Street, New York City, NY 10027
subway 1, exit 116th Street
Doors opened at 10.00 am, and there was an informal gathering afterwards until 5.00 pm
(we encouraged everyone to bring their own food, something simple,
as TC dining hall or Everett Library café were open only from 11 am to 2 pm)

• The program develops further down on this site (check often) and is downloadable here

This workshop series is being hosted annually since 2003
by
The Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution
(MD-ICCCR)
Columbia University, Teachers College (TC)
525 West 120th Street, New York City, NY 10027
in cooperation with the World Dignity University initiative

Honorary Convenor since 2003
Morton Deutsch
First HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award Recipient in 2009

(he sadly passed away in March 2017, and we honor his memory)

Linda Hartling & Morton Deutsch & Evelin Lindner
Evelin Lindner, Morton Deutsch, Linda Hartling
This photo was taken in 2014
Please click on the picture to it larger


Message of gratitude to Linda M. Hartling
Linda Hartling has helped nurturing this workshop series into being since 2003. See appreciations for Linda during the 2021 workshop, both at the end of Day Two (Video) and at the end of Day Three of (Video). See also a message of gratitude from Evelin Lindner, recorded prior to the 2020 workshop on November 25 and December 9, 2020 (Video)


In preparation for attending our workshops, all participants are always kindly asked to make themselves familiar with the Appreciative Enquiry Frame that we use in our work. See an introduction created by Linda Hartling on November 21, 2023
(see also 2022, 2021, 2020, 2019, 2016, 2015, 2014 (see also Pdf), 2012, 2011, and see An Appreciative Frame, written by Linda Hartling in 2005, and see also an early overview)

All participants are always asked to kindly learn about our Dignilogue (Dignity + Dialogue) Approach and Connection-Reflection Groups

Kindly see our invitation sent out on November 7, 2023, and the Dignity Letter sent out on September 17, 2023

All our workshops are invitations to explore how we can best deepen, grow, and practice the global message of dignity — now and far into the future.

If you wish to participate in our workshops, please send an email to workshops@humiliationstudies.org. Please kindly include your contact information and any other details you would like to share with our community (such as CV, papers, articles, presentations, video links, etc.).

Please know that you are always invited to spend the entire workshop with us, so that true dignity-family building can emerge. All our events are part of an ongoing effort to nurture a global community of people who wish to nurture more dignity in the world. The workshop series follows a format of organic growth, and is thus different from mainstream conferences. In all our events, our aim is to create a community — rather than having an "audience" listen to "speakers" or "presenters." All participants are warmly invited to fill out our Appreciative Introduction form (Word | PDF) and send it to us or bring it with them.

There is no registration fee, we share minimal cost according to ability. To cover our expenses, we always summarise the costs during the conference and invite participants to contribute according to their ability. This collaborative approach to financing allows us to keep the conference affordable for all. Our work is a labor of love and maintained entirely by those who give their time and energy as a gift. All our efforts are pro bono and not-for-profit endeavors. Everyone who participates does so because of dignity, because of their appreciation for our work for dignity. Nobody is there "for the money," nobody is being paid, there is no "paid staff." This is our way of walking our talk of "being the change we want to see in the world." We welcome all donations to this workshop, be it your time, your creativity, or, if you wish, your economic support (please see this secure link). We thank all participants in our conferences for being fully responsible for bearing the cost of their own travel, transportation, and accommodation arrangements. We also strive to organize our conferences as Green Conferences. Thank you for your loving support!

This page is part of our larger website that serves as a "virtual field journal" and an open resource, documenting all of our events and initiatives over time, always remaining available to our global dignity community. Our members regularly consider a variety of electronic options for sharing our efforts on social media (see, for instance, the Digniworld initiative), and we have found it beneficial to keep the main HumanDHS website organized by posting the contents of events on extended pages, with links to additional information both on other pages of our website and on external places. The entire website resembles a large "organism," a large web of content that weaves together our entire work since 2001.

During our conferences, we always ask all participants for their permission to have their pictures or videos posted on our website, however, if you change your mind later, either in total or for specific pictures/videos, please let us know! Thank you! Since we wish to walk the talk of dignity, it is very important for us to do our utmost in respecting everybody's privacy. We refrain from gathering written permissions from you during our conferences, since we value the building of mutual trust in relationships, and we also would like to refrain from contributing to an ever more bureaucratic and legalistic society.

• For previous workshops, see a compilation of all NY workshops and the newsletters written after these conferences.

• This workshop was the twentieth workshop in a series that began in 2003. See an overview over all our previous conferences and see the workshops of 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022.


Thank you for always reviewing the following tips for smooth "zooming"

 


Please click on the images to see them larger

• Please watch Linda Hartling explaining the use of the camera and microphone during this workshop (Video on Day Three of the 2021 workshop)

• Please note that all sessions are being recorded except for the Connection-Reflection Groups.
If you do not wish to be recorded, you are asked to please kindly turn off your video and microphone.

• In all our gatherings, we ask you to please kindly mute your microphone and turn off your video during plenary sessions
to protect the quality of our electronic connection. Thank you!


Program of the Workshop


11:00 – 11:15 am

Welcome and Greetings — Introducing this Workshop
(Video edited by Linda Hartling)
Linda Hartling, Director of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network
Evelin Lindner, Founding President of HumanDHS




In the light of heartbreaking violence in the world, Linda Hartling and Evelin Lindner renamed the workshop and gave it the title, "The Urgency of Seeding Dignity: Honoring 20 Years of Global Collaboration for Transforming Suffering Through Courageous and Compassionate Action" instead of the original tentative titles, which were: "Twenty Years of Seeding Dignity: A Community Celebration", "Celebrating Seeds of Dignity: 20 Years of Collaboration," "Celebrating Seeds of Dignity: 20 Years of Cultivating Change," "Twenty Year of Seeding Dignity: A Community Celebration," or "Celebrating Seeds of Dignity: 20 Years of Global Collaboration through Compassion and Courageous Action."
Linda and Evelin formulated this message: We are heartbroken that our generation has failed to create global institutions strong enough to guarantee that conflicts and grievances are being addressed without violence. No one should stand alone and be unprotected in the face of humiliation and/or aggression. “An eye for an eye leaves the whole world blind” is frequently attributed to M. K. Gandhi. In other words, we, as humanity, jeopardize our own survival by leaving people to have to defend themselves alone. Cycles of humiliation and aggression tend to spiral out of control, and when this happens, every living being on this planet is in danger. In former times, "total victory" over "enemies" might have been possible, yet we live in new times. We live in a globally interconnected world with grave social and environmental challenges that are aggravated by war. War has devastating sociocidal and ecocidal impacts, increasing the obstacles that stand in the way of the global cooperation that is needed to address these challenges. It is in everyone's own interest, as a member of the human family, to prevent such devastating scenarios. The United Nations was once founded with such an aim, and our generation has failed to manifest it. We, Linda and Evelin, have given our lives to raising awareness for this task, we have worked tirelessly, sacrificing every moment of our lives. We feel deeply aggrieved that we live in a world where the benefits of equal dignity in mutual solidarity still wait to be realized.


This is Linda Hartling's workshop "cockpit"
Without Linda, this workshop would not be possible!

• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


Linda Hartling is the Director of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies fellowship and the World Dignity University (WDU) Initiative, as well as Dignity Press. She is based in Portland, Oregon, where she and her husband have created the first HumanDHS Dialogue Home and are building our HumanDHS Library. Linda is also affiliated with the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute at Wellesley College near Boston, Massachusetts, of which she was the Associate Director in support of its founder pioneer thinker Jean Baker Miller.

Building a Mutual-Learning Community: The Appreciative Enquiry Approach by Linda Hartling
(2023 Video | see also the 2022 Video)

Evelin Lindner is the founding president of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS). She has also developed the idea of the World Dignity University initiative and is its co-founder, including Dignity Press and World Dignity University Press. All initiatives are not-for-profit efforts. Lindner has a dual education as a Medical Doctor and a Psychologist, with a Ph.D. in Medicine from the University in Hamburg in Germany, and a Ph.D. in Psychology from the Department of Psychology at the University of Oslo. Her first book, based on her doctoral dissertation in psychology, Making Enemies: Humiliation and International Conflict, was honored as "Outstanding Academic Title" by the journal Choice in 2007. She has since written five more books. She lives and teaches globally and is affiliated, among others, with the the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution at Teachers College, Columbia University.



• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop

Evelin Lindner: First, I would like to express my deep gratitude to all those who have made this workshop possible. Dear Linda, you have nurtured this workshop series into life over the years in such dignifying ways, nobody else could do this. As we all know, such conferences and workshops do not "fall from the sky," they require months and years of what we call "invisible" work!
I would also like to thank the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution at Teachers College of Columbia University in New York City for hosting this workshop series so lovingly every year since 2003! I am thinking of our dear Morton Deutsch, who convened the first workshop in this series in 2003, and his successor Peter Coleman, together with Ann Charlott, Cassandra, Pedro and D'Artagnan, and all his wonderful team. We are so thankful to the MD-ICCCR for hosting this workshop at Teachers College every year since 2003! On 11th December 2009, our dear Morton Deutsch received our Lifetime Commitment Award, and we are so happy that Peter Coleman, its director, has accepted our Lifetime Commitment Award two years ago, in 2020!
More than 100 friends have registered for this workshop from all continents. In Oregon, where Linda is, it is morning, where we in this room are now, in New York, it is in the middle of the day, and in New Zealand it is already the next day!
Dear friends, please know that this is a lifelong project rather than a single event. Our overall aim is to build what we call a “global dignity family.” Among others, we invite all educators and learners who wish to bring more dignity into the world to nurture the educational initiative that we launched in 2011, the World Dignity University initiative.
Dear friends, please know also that there is never enough time to say what needs to be said during the workshop. Please try to stay with us during this workshop as much as you can, preferably throughout the entire event, so that you can get to know each other and stay in touch also after the workshop. We have planned several small groups during this workshop, we call them “small group dignilogues,” where you can get to know each other personally.
Finally, let me share that our work is a labor of love, we work with a budget that is close to zero. Everyone gives according to their ability whatever they can — their time, their energy, their creativity — all as a gift of love. We therefore depend on you to solve any technical problem that might arise on your side as best as you can! Thank you so much for your loving understanding!
Finally, I would like to thank again Linda Hartling, our director, and the entire Digni-Organizing team, for making this wonderful workshop possible!


The Dignity Anthem
by Michael Boyer

This amazing Dignity Anthem was kindly created by Michael Boyer in November 2022
Please see:
the anthem with big subtitles
the anthem with with small subtitles
the anthem without subtitles
the text of the anthem



Michael Boyer is a creative artist who has been a supporter of the dignity work since its inception. He is a member of the Dignity Now group in the city of Hamelin in Germany. Michael has also developed the Digniworld initiative (in 2019), namely, Digniworld Wordpress, Digniworld Facebook, Digniworld Twitter, Digniworld Instagram, and World Dignity Movement (on YouTube). See more on:
- https://humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/whoweare.php#socialmedia
- tinyurl.com/dignism


Michael Boyer is also playing the role of the Pied Piper in Hamelin


The Joy of Meeting in Person for the First Time Since 2019!


Special gratitude goes to Anna Strout and Fatma Tufan from HumanDHS, and to Ann Charlott Macek from MC-ICCCR!


Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop


Introducing the Morton Deutsch Center
(2022 Video)

The Way Out Challenge
Peter Coleman, Director of the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR), Columbia University, Teachers College (TC)
2022 Video


• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's screenshots of Peter Coleman's presentation
• Kindly click here to see Chipamong Chowdhury's screenshots of Peter Coleman's presentation

Peter T. Coleman is Professor of Psychology and Education at Columbia University, where he holds a joint-appointment at Teachers College and The Earth Institute. Dr. Coleman directs the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR), is founding director of the Institute for Psychological Science and Practice (IPSP), and is executive director of Columbia University’s Advanced Consortium on Cooperation, Conflict, and Complexity (AC4).
His new book titled, The Way Out: How to Overcome Toxic Polarization, was released in 2021.

Morton Deutsch and Peter Coleman have been pillars of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network since its inception, and on December 11, 2009, Morton Deutsch was the first recipient of the HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award. Peter Coleman has been honored with the 2020 HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award at the 17th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict at Columbia University in New York City, December 10 – 12, 2020. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, this conference had to take place online. See www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/annualmeeting/35.php#coleman

Thanking Peter Coleman with Anna Strout 2022 Video


11:15 am – 12:00 pm

Carriers of Hope
Don Klein Memorial Lecture by Michael Britton, HumanDHS Board Member
(Video edited by Linda Hartling | Video pre-recorded on December 6, 2023)
Thank you, dear Michael! (Video)



• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop

Michael is a HumanDHS Board Director, who has been part of the community since 2007. He has been our Don Klein Memorial lecturer since it was created, and is the recipient of our 2017 Lifetime Commitment Award! He is a co-founder of Dignity Now NYC which, thanks to Zoom, is now also global. He is Vice President of the International Psychohistory Association, and has lectured locally and internationally.

Scrim

Michael uses Don's metaphor of a scrim, a transparent stage curtain, where one believes that what one sees is reality only as long as the light shines on it in a certain way: see Don's explanation.


Meet and Greet — Reflection and Connection Groups — Introduced by Janet Gerson, HumanDHS Board Director (Video)

 



• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

Effecting Change:
Maintaining, While Venturing Beyond, Our Safe Circles

A Workshop within a Workshop facilitated by David Yamada, Director of the WDUi
(Video 1 online | Video 2 room | Video 3 online | Video 4 postscript | Pdf)
Thank you, dear David! (Video)




• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop

The outcome goal of the workshop was to encourage future planning and action.

How many of us feel the tug between seeking safe and comforting communities of friends and compatriots, and wanting to be forces of positive change in response to the very fraught and often angry world swirling around us?
Communities such as HumanDHS provide support, affirmation, refuge from the figurative storms, and sounding boards to float ideas, opinions, and artistic expression. These safe circles are invaluable for maintaining our well-being. If, however, we wish to serve as change agents, then typically we must venture beyond those safe circles, often in a more public setting. These activities may involve, among other things:

• Writing and publishing • Performing (theatre, music) • Creating (artistic work in any form; groups & organizations) • Speaking, discussing, facilitating, and conversing (in any medium) • Designing • Running (as in for elective office) • Protesting • Leading/administering (organizations, groups, projects) • Testifying (in any venue) • Teaching (in any setting) • Organizing • Caretaking • Building • Inventing • Healing • Advocating • Negotiating/Mediating • …and otherwise putting ourselves “out there.”

These efforts and the responses they attract may be fulfilling, rewarding, and impactful. They also may be exhausting, frustrating, and possibly threatening. In some cases, they may trigger past difficult or traumatic experiences. In such circumstances, we understandably may seek to return to safer grounds, for brief or longer periods of time.
This workshop recognizes that duality. It will invite us to pose questions to ourselves, applying one of two frameworks for inquiry:

The first option is roughly adapted from a social action research model:
• Personal vision and assessment: What kind of change do I want to see? What can I do to help achieve it?
What personal and external resources do I have to engage in a change agent mode? What are my places of support and affirmation amid all this, and how do I nurture and maintain them?
• Specific actions: What specific actions do I want to take? How do I do them? How do I monitor my own well-being?
• Challenges: What personal barriers or obstacles might make it difficult for me to engage in the activity I
wish to pursue? How do I work through or overcome them?
• Evaluation: How do I measure success? How am I doing, personally?

The second option is a personal SWOT (Strengths-Weaknesses-Opportunities-Threats) model:
• Strengths: What strengths do I bring to this desired realm of activity?
• Weaknesses: What weaknesses do I bring to this desired realm of activity?
• Opportunities: What opportunities do I have to make a difference?
• Threats: What threats may present themselves as I engage in this activity?

Our Workshop-Within-a-Workshop Time (90 minutes): During our workshop-within-a- workshop, we will divide our time this way:

• Describe the purpose of the workshop (15 minutes): The modest goals of this time together.
• Release time (30 minutes): You step away, apply a framework for inquiry, search the Web, etc. (Those who do not have access to the internet can use the time to make notes and a develop a research plan to pursue once they do have internet access. They can then discuss their plans during the small group sessions, even if they are in a more tentative state.)
~Take notes! Especially if this theme resonates with you, the thinking you do here may lead to something much more substantive.
~With online searches, ask away! E.g., “How to start a podcast/blog/newsletter,” “How to create an online course,” “How to post comments on news sites,” “How to become a (fill in the blank),” “How to contact an elected/appointed public official,” “How to engage in self-care.”
• Small groups (30 minutes): Folks are invited to share whatever salient point(s) they wish from what they learned and/or planned via this exercise.
• Reconvene as a full group (15 minutes): Quick summing up.

* HumanDHS Board Member & WDU Director. Professor of Law and Director, New Workplace Institute, Suffolk
University Law School, Boston, MA. Email: dyamada@suffolk.edu.

Kindly consider also:
Storey, Valerie, and Roschanda Fletcher (2023). "Developing scholar activists: The role of the EdD." In Impacting Education, 8 (1), pp. 1–8. doi: 10.5195/ie.2023.277.
Abstract: A qualitative descriptive approach was followed in the research, starting with a theoretical conceptualization of scholar activism within doctoral education as a basis for further inquiry. Seventeen doctoral candidates described how they conceptualized and applied the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate's (CPED) Framework for the Emerging EdD Activist to their experiences in an online program. Study respondents gave accounts of growing confidence to engage in active, vocal advocacy, which they attributed to their new knowledge and understandings gained through participation in the program. However, for some mid-career students, increased vocal advocacy in the workplace was perceived as endangering career prospects. The data draw attention to the complexity of the professional learning process, calling into question the current input- output model of activism. Further research is necessary to develop a greater understanding of the relationship between a developing scholar-activist and the impact of the EdD and precisely how that can be measured. The findings from this study have implications for program developers and doctoral students wishing to become scholar-activists and agents of change.

David Yamada is a law professor at Suffolk University Law School in Boston, where he has been doing important work on addressing workplace bullying and expanding the field of therapeutic jurisprudence. He has been a member of our HumanDHS Board for many years and recently agreed to become the director of the WDUi. Kindly learn more about the WDU initiative on our education page, in newsletter 12, in the 2021 workshop's Pre-Planned Dignilogue #4: Plotting the Future of the World Dignity University Initiative, or in the 2022 Workshop within a Workshop facilitated by David Yamada, Non-Degree Higher and Adult Education to Advance Human Dignity.


1:30 – 1:45 pm

Bio-Break/Coffee Break (please mute) — Chat Open


2023 HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award

Francisco Gomes de Matos is the recipient of 2023 HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award at age 90!
Congratulations!
Please enjoy our award ceremony honoring Francisco Gomes de Matos from the workshop (Video)
He kindly pre-recorded his acceptance speech on November 26, 2023 (Video )

These are Francisco's words, transcribed by Linda Hartling:
AGRADECIMENTO: A digniappreciation to HDHS
"What a privilege to receive your Award! May I humbly say I am proud to have been committed to Dignity studies firstly through online and then briefly face to face with Evelin Lindner during her lecturing visit to Recife -- UFPE and ABA. For the publication of my Dignity book by Dignity Press in 2013 I am deeply grateful. I have a list of things to be thankful for, but instead, may I close by saying you helped me become a dignilinguist now."
Cofounder of ABA Global Education Recife
Professor Emeritus of Linguistics at Universidade Federal de Pernambuco


Kindly click on the picture to see it larger

Francisco Gomes de Matos is a pillar of our dignity work since 2002. He is also a Founding Member of the World Dignity University initiative. Morton Deutsch shared Francisco's email with Evelin Lindner on August 4, 2002, and she wrote a message to Francisco the same day. In 2012, when Evelin came to South America, Francisco literally "carried" her through Brazil. Among many others, he had connected her with wonderful Gabriela Saab in São Paulo already in 2009, and in 2012 with Ricardo Jose Pereira Rodrigues, Senior Policy Specialist at the Office of Legislative Counsel and Policy Guidance of the Chamber of Deputies in Brasilia. Both made Evelin feel welcome and at home in their respective cities. When Evelin arrived in Recife on June 8, 2012, Francisco expected her at the airport. It was a wonderful first meeting in person, followed by getting to know his lovely family on June 9, 2012, and giving talks at the Associação Brazil America (ABA) that was founded in 1988, and at the Universidade Federal de Pernambuco.
Francisco's ingenious rhymed reflections are to be found all over the HumanDHS website, on the HumanDHS's World Language for Equal Dignity page, the HumanDHS's Creativity Through Equal Dignity page, and on the Index page.
His wonderful book Dignity. A Multidimensional View was published by Dignity Press in 2013.


Catharina Carvalho is the daughter of Eduardo Carvalho, the Executive Director of the ABA-Associação Brasil América in Recife, Brazil, of which Francisco Gomes de Matos is a co-founder. As Catharina is based in the U.S.A., she kindly offers to make sure that Francisco Gomes de Matos will receive his award plaque in Recife! Thank you so much, dear Catharina! (Video)


1:45 – 3:15 pm

Seeding Dignity Through Collaborative Action
Janet Gerson and Elaine Meis



• Kindly see Janet Gerson explaining the netaphor of the lotus flower (Video)
• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


Janet Gerson and Elaine Meis hosted this Dignilogue (in four parts, two online and two in person):
In person:
Humiliation Trauma with Sharon Steinborn and Peter Pollard
Movement for Building Movements: Engagement and Collaboration, Including the Arts with Martha Eddy
Online:
Giving and Receiving Simple Acts of Kindness as Seeds of Dignity with Beth Boyton (Video)
Reimagining Education with Phil Brown and Stephanie Knox Steiner (Video)

Dr. Janet C. Gerson is a HumanDHS Board Member and she co-hosts Dignity Now circles in New York City since 2015. She is a political theorist, writer, artist, and activist educator who has taught peace education, conflict processes, transformative learning, and futures envisioning. She is the Education Director of the International Institute on Peace Education (IIPE), and former Co-Director of the Peace Education Center at Teachers College, Columbia University in New York City (2001- 2010). She has collaborated with the Morton Deutsch International Center on Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR) at at Teachers College since 1996. Her research and writing focus on the interrelatedness of dignity, justice, democracy and peace.

Elaine Meis is a political activist who is a long-standing member of the Dignity Now in New York City group. She is a former consultant in the software business, working with Silicon Valley startups and other clients on marketing strategy and public relations. With her former husband, she was a conscientious objector to the Vietnam War. Together they took a stand against President Ford’s conditional amnesty program, which failed to acknowledge the contribution draft resisters made to ending the immoral war, and then helped set a precedent for the government to drop the impending indictments of many draft resisters. Elaine recently moved from the west coast to Harlem, New York, and attended the Workshops on Humiliation and Violent Conflict since 2018 to explore how a greater sense of dignity can be cultivated in her new community and beyond.


In-Person Small Group Dignilogues



Online Small Group Dignilogues

Humiliation Trauma
with Sharon Steinborn and Peter Pollard


• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop

• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop

 

 

Reimagining Education
with Phil Brown and Stephanie Knox Steiner
A participatory discussion of why we need a fundamental shift in educational purpose and structures. We explored some current examples of how to reimagine education practice from Pre-K to higher education and beyond.



• Kindly see Stephanie Knox Steiner and Phil Brown reporting on their Dignilogue (Video)
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop

Movement for Building Movements: Engagement and Collaboration, Including the Arts
with Martha Eddy
Together we investigated increasing our capacity for collaboration with our minds and bodies by using experiential activities including the arts.


• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop

• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop

 

 

Giving and Receiving Simple Acts of Kindness as Seeds of Dignity
with Beth Boyton
What are some examples of simple acts of kindness? What's an experience that you can think of where you offered or received one? What ideas do you have for increasing or celebrating them?



• Kindly see Beth Boynton reporting on her Dignilogue (Video)
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


3:15 – 3:45 pm

Coming Together During Difficult Times: Linda Hartling and Evelin Lindner in Dialogue (Video)
Linda Hartling, Director of HumanDHS
Evelin Lindner, Founding President of HumanDHS and Global Ambassador of the World Dignity University initiative (WDUi)

The Urgency of Seeding Dignity: Coming Together During Difficult Times
Reflections shared by Evelin Lindner, recorded on Zoom on November 26, 2023, in New York City (Video | PowerPoint).
Thank you, dear Kathy Goodman, for your comment, "Never again" is not enough! "Resist the beginnings" is crucial! "Never again" is about remembering, "resist the beginnings" is about preventing "once again"!
See also the synopsis of Evelin's book From Humiliation to Dignity: For a Future of Global Solidarity finalized early 2022



• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop



3:45 – 4:00 pm


Carrying the Message Forward — Concluding Appreciations and Inspirations
— Evelin Lindner, Linda Hartling, David Yamada, and Michael Britton
(Video)





• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


• Group Photo (Video)
• Thank You to Shahid Khan! (Video)
• Peter Barus: Not Digital, but Dignital Age! (Video)
• Thank You to Michael Britton! (Video)
• Thank You to David Yamada! (Video)
• Thank You to Sharon, Martha, Beth, Stephanie, Phil, and More! (Video)
• Gratitude to All Dignigardeners! (Video)
• Lucien Lombardo Shared His Experiences (Video)
• Karin Dremel Share Her Thoughts (Video)
• Isabel Barroso Shared Her Thoughts (Video)
• Great Gratitude to All Participants (Video)

Evelin Lindner, together with all other participants, always expresses deep gratitude and admiration for the extraordinary dignifying leadership of Linda Hartling, who makes this workshop series possible (2021 Video)
Linda nurtured also this workshop into being!
We have no words to thank you, dearest Linda!


Musical ending
(Video)



Thank you so much, dear David Yamada, for singing A Wonderful World as a tradition at the end of every annual workshop (Text | 2023 Video | 2021 Video)


In the spirit of our motto of Unity in Diversity, Fred Ellis and his young students have always contributed with singing songs from many cultural backgrounds
(Video 2018)



BYOP: Bring Your Own Pizza Party!
(Video)


Films, Music, Movement, and Poetry

A big thank you to all
film, music, movement, and poetry contributors
throughout the workshop!

Zuzka Kurtz and Geoffrey Hug kindly offer their feature length documentary film titled Hudson, America, where they follow a group of Bangladeshi students in Upstate NY from 2016 – 2022! Thank you for this profound and crucially important work, dear Zuzka and Geoffrey! Thank you for offering a free link for our dignity community (upon request from zk@zuzkakurtz.com)!

Francisco Gomes de Matos kindly composed a rhymed reflection as a contribution to this Workshop on November 7, 2023:
A world without a war
Humanity as never before
Peace opening every door
Let's wish that from our core

Joanie Calem offers an old Jewish legend that there are always 36 sparks of holy light traveling around in different people to keep the world running right, and we never know where that spark might be, so we have to treat each other with the respect and dignity befitting that holiness... Joanie offers a video of the song and the story combined on her YouTube channel.
In 2021, Joanie Calem shared reflections (Video 2021) and thoughts (Video 2021). She also sang No Borders (Video | Video recorded on November 17, 2021)

Bonnie Selterman kindly composed a poem titled No Such Thing, for this year's workshop (Video recorded on November 2023 | Pdf).
Thank you so much, dear Bonnie! Each year, you offer us your immensely dignifying creativity!

• Dearest Ella Autti, what a gift you are to our dignity work! You have so many talents! From singing to graphic design! Thank you also so much for singing Over the Rainbow for us in our 2022 workshop (Video), and for contributing with Cover Me in Sunshine" to our 2023 workshop (Video recorded on December 5, 2023)

 

 

 


 

Participants (alphabetical according to the first name) invited to join in person (limited space)

In the 2023 registration form, we asked two questions, (1) "Please share your interest in specific topics of dignity (e.g., dignity education/learning, dignity through dialogue, conflict transformation, social justice, ecology/climate crises, creative arts activism, etc.; 1-3 topics)," and (2) "Do you have a brief dignity story/message you would like to share? Please share below (we welcome longer stories sent to: humandhs@humiliationstudies.org). THANK YOU!"

In the 2020 registration form, participants were warmly invited to reflect on the following question: What does dignity mean to you?
In the 2021 registration form, the question was: What does dignity through solidarity mean to you?

Many participants kindly offered their thoughts.
The relational nature of our dignity work is made visible by small personal "love letters" that honor the dignifying connectivity that forms the foundation of the global dignity fellowship.

Anna Strout, Albuquerque, New Mexico, New York City, U.S.A.

Dear Anna! We have many names for you, and all the names we have for you express our love, gratitude, and admiration for you! We have names such as Dignity Angel...!
How can we ever thank you enough for your wonderful presence, including your gift of photography! We cannot imagine our workshops without your presence anymore, since Zehlia Babaci-Wilhite brought you to us in 2012!


• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop

2023: All of Anna Strout's photos:

Day One • Kindly click here to see Anna's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop

Thank you so much for jumping in and doing Zoom photography in these times of a pandemic where everything had to be virtual:

2022: All of Anna Strout's group photo sessions:

Day One • After Peter Coleman's presentation (Video)
• After David Yamada's workshop (Video)

2021: All of Anna Strout's group photo sessions:

Day One • With Danielle Coon (Video recording 1 | Video recording 2 | Video recording 3)
• End of Day (Video recording 1 | Video recording 2)
Day Two • End of Day (Video)
Day Three • After Evelin Lindner's talk (Video)
• End of Day (Video | Video with Banner)

2020: All of Anna Strout's group photo sessions:

Day One • Day One (Video | see also long | short)
Day Three • End of Dignilogue 5 (Video)
• End of Day (Video)

• Thanks so much also for sharing this Message to the World — Prevent Domestic Violence in our 2020 workshop! (PSA shared on November 15, 2020 | Small poster | Video)
(PSA = a public service announcement in the public interest disseminated without charge, with the objective of raising awareness)

   

Charlott Macek, New York City

Thank you so much, dear Charlott, for your untiring support to our dignity work since you began working with the MD-ICCCR in 2013, after your time at the book shop of Teachers College! Each year, you give us great courage! What would we do without your expert caring hand in the background and your wonderful presence!

   

Chipamong (Chipa) Chowdhury, or Bhante Revata Dhamma (monk's name, known in the monastic communities), Nomad Eco-Monk, with interest in Nomadic life, Buddhism/Cinema, Pali literature, Religion/Politics/global affairs

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Bhante Revata always explains, "It reminds me of the words 'Agitate, educate and organize' by Dr. Ambedkar."


• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


Thank you so much, dear Bhante, for your most inspiring life as a "nomad eco-monk"! We remember how you wrote to us in 2008 after you got to know about our work in the United Nations Indigenous Forum, in the Seventh Session “Climate change, bio-cultural diversity and livelihoods: The stewardship role of indigenous peoples and new challenges,” April 21 – May 2, 2008. Your wish was to participate in our 2008 Norway conference, however, you were ultimately hindered to join us, and we were delighted to have you with us in our 2008 workshop in New York City! From then on you have been a gift of dignity in every single of our workshops, every year! By now, you have grown to be a core member of our dignity nurturing team, and we thank you for being such a gift to the world and to our dignity community!

Thank you so much for initiating and co-editing this important and most touching book, and for writing the Preface:
Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations: Essays on Dignity Studies in Honor of Evelin G. Lindner. Edited by Chipamong Chowdhury, Michael F. Britton, and Linda M. Hartling (Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2019)

Thank you also for your many generous and important contributions to our 2021 workshop:
A Poem — Inner Dignity for Daily Meditation and Reflection shared on Day Two (Video)
• You offered a Bonus Session titled Pandemic, Inner Adventure, and Nomad Mindfulness! on Day Two of the workshop (Video)
• You contributed to Dignilogue 5 on Day Three with Buddhism Activism Democracy in Myanmar (Video)
• At the end of the workshop, you introduced your friends (Video)

You also contributed richly to the 2020 workshop:
Bhante Revata Dhamma: The Nomad Monk (Videos recorded in 2020, brought together by Linda Hartling on December 3, 2020)

   

Elaine Meis, New York City

Message from Evelin Lindner: Thank you so much, dear Elaine, for being such a wonderful pillar of our dignity work all they way back to 2018, when we met at the Nanlaoshu Center in New York City! Thank you for being such a great member of the Digniplanning Team and Dignigardener Team also in our 2023 workshop! Thank you for hosting the Dignilogue titled Seeding Dignity Through Collaborative Action (in four parts, two online and two in person) together with dear Janet Gerson! Also in our 2020 and 2021, you so kindly hosted Dignilogue 5!

Dear Elaine, Linda and I admire you. We have recently discussed that we share a loving and tender affection for all living creatures, including us humans, something that can move us to tears when we see the beauty of it. For me, I can say that the joy of connection and loving care is what keeps me alive. Not all people seem to share this affection, YOU have it! We CELEBRATE you!


• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


Elaine Meis is a political activist who is a long-standing member of the Dignity Now in New York City group. She is a former consultant in the software business, working with Silicon Valley startups and other clients on marketing strategy and public relations. With her former husband, she was a conscientious objector to the Vietnam War. Together they took a stand against President Ford’s conditional amnesty program, which failed to acknowledge the contribution draft resisters made to ending the immoral war, and then helped set a precedent for the government to drop the impending indictments of many draft resisters. Elaine recently moved from the west coast to Harlem, New York, and attended the Workshops on Humiliation and Violent Conflict since 2018 to explore how a greater sense of dignity can be cultivated in her new community and beyond.

• Elaine hosted Dignilogue #5: Continuing Connections: Dignity Now Groups for Developing Ongoing Dialogue (Video). The 2020 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Virtual, Columbia University, New York City, December 10 – 12, 2020.
Elaine hosted Dignilogue #5: Pathways to Solidarity: Dignifying Relationships with People and the Planet — Turning Ideas into Action (Video). The 2021 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Virtual, Columbia University, New York City, December 9 – 11, 2021.

   

Evelin Lindner, Global

"Dignity, for me, is the ability to stand tall with open arms, lovingly welcoming all others as equals in worthiness."


• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


Evelin Lindner is the founding president of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS). She has also developed the idea of the World Dignity University initiative and is its co-founder, including Dignity Press and World Dignity University Press. All initiatives are not-for-profit efforts. Evelin has a dual education as a Medical Doctor and a Psychologist, with a Ph.D. in Medicine from the University in Hamburg in Germany, and a Ph.D. in Psychology from the Department of Psychology at the University of Oslo. Her first book, based on her doctoral dissertation in psychology, Making Enemies: Humiliation and International Conflict, was honored as "Outstanding Academic Title" by the journal Choice in 2007. She has since written five more books. She lives and teaches globally and is affiliated, among others, with the the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution at Teachers College, Columbia University. Please see her background at humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin.php.

Kindly see, among others:
• Synopsis: From Humiliation to Dignity: For a Future of Global Solidarity. Lake Oswego, OR: World Dignity University Press, Dignity Press, 2022 (Pdf)
From Humiliation to Dignity: For a Future of Global Solidarity – The Coronavirus Pandemic as Opportunity in the Midst of Suffering (Original | Pdf), in InterViews: An Interdisciplinary Journal in Social Sciences, 7 (1), 2020, pp. 30–50, doi: 10.36061/IV.7.1.20.30.50
Bringing Dignity to Globalisation: A Psychologist’s Personal Experience as a Global Citizen - Evelin Lindner’s Global Life. Book proposal created in response to an invitation by Louise Sundararajan, Series Editor of the Palgrave Studies in Indigenous Psychology, 2019

   

Fatma Susan Tufan, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dearest Fatma, you have no idea how much we value your deep wisdom and sensitivity! Few people have understood the dynamics of dignity and its violation through humiliation as profoundly as you have! What is particularly difficult to see and to address is unconscious bias. In your wonderfully loving and caring way, you make us all see things we were not able to see before! Thank you for being such a gift of dignity to the world and to us!


• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop

Fatma Susan Tufan has been a member of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies since 2019. She holds a B.A. in Sociology with a minor in Peace and Justices from Moravian University, Pennsylvania., U.S.A., and an M.A. in the Social-Psychology program at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City. She also completed an Advanced Certificate Program in Cooperation and Conflict Resolution at the Morton-Deutsch International Cooperation and Conflict Resolution Center, Columbia University.
In her work, Fatma primarily focuses on sustainable solutions to drivers of conflict in human relations. She has 18 years of experience in Interfaith Dialogue. Currently, she is working on turning her dialogue and constructive conflict related real-life experiences into stories to share with the rest of the world. Fatma identifies herself as a global citizen. [read more]

   

Gay Rosenblum-Kumar, New York City

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dear Gay, your support for our dignity work since 2001 has been immensely enriching and of exceptional substance! Every fall, when I was in New York City, we met in the UN cafeteria for lunch and we shared past year's insights! And you joined our workshops in 2004 2007, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2021, and 2022!
'
• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


Dear Gay, I learned so much each time you invited me to share my reflections:
How Are Dignity and Humiliation Relevant in Our Lives, Our Societies, and for the United Nations?
The UN Interagency Framework Team for Preventive Action cordially invited to a brown bag lunch event on Tuesday, November 26, 2013, 1pm – 2.30 pm at 1 UN Plaza (DC-1), 20th Floor Conference Room. The host is Gay Rosenblum-Kumar.
Understanding and Addressing Humiliation and Conflict
Brown Bag Lunch at the UN Interagency Framework Team for Preventive Action, December 2, 2010, 12-2.30 pm, convened at the United Nations, New York City, U.S.A., organized by Gay Rosenblum-Kumar
See pictures.
• These talks connected back to Humiliation, Conflict Management, and Policy Making, brown bag lunch at the Governance and Public Administration Branch, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, on December 15, 2004.

   

Hua-Chu Yen, New York City

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dearest Hua-Chu, thank you so much for your faithful support since 2007! You did the videotaping in our 2007 workshop, and also in some of the later workshops. You did the videotaping of my 2012 book talk on "a dignity economy," and in 2014, you posted the photo of Linda and me on Instagram on the first page of Teachers College! Since then, you have always remained at our side! Thank you!!!

Hua-Chu Yen (Ed. D.) is an artist, educator and digital media specialist. She received her doctorate from the Art and Art Education Program at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research examines the intersections within digital media, emerging technologies and cinema through the prisms of philosophical ideas and artistic expressions. With her master degree in Art and Art History from Tufts University and in Interactive Telecommunications Program from New York University, Hua-Chu Yen has worked for museums, I.D. Magazine, and Art Science Research Lab, and taught photography and video at Teachers College. A native Taiwanese, Hua-Chu has published two books and numerous articles about visual art in New York for general public in Chinese-speaking communities.

   

Janet Gerson, New York City

Dr. Janet C. Gerson is the recipient of the 2018 HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award.

What does "dignity through solidarity" mean to you? Janet's answer:
"Dignity is the core value of a moral society. Dignity is taken to be inherent in each and every person. Entitlements, in contrast, are what governments and societies give through laws, policies, and practices. These can be both given and also taken away, unlike dignity. Dignity is operationalized through respect, the ethical principle for interpersonal interactions. From a relational conception based on dignity, justice is what each person is due and what we owe each other (Dale Snauwaert). Justice is dynamic, always balancing moral and ethical norms with practical challenges and institutional (stabilizing) formulations. Solidarity is based on the moral understanding that we know that we need each other, that human beings are interconnected and interdependent. Solidarity can be operationalized as an ethical interactive principle like respect, but how is it further enacted? From a dignity-based perspective, solidarity must be grass-roots, inclusive, communitive, and based on willing cooperation of all those involved. It is necessary to state this because solidarity has often been imposed, engaging a domination-and-control model of social-political organizing.
Solidarity is possible through dialogic means engaging deliberation and consensus-based decision-making. In reality, solidarity is often made up of a willingness to participate together based on mutual respect and understanding. Rawls stated that reasoned argumentation can lead to a congruence of opinion, a recognition that an understanding and agreement has been reached that, nevertheless, does not mean that every participant agrees 100%. Instead, it implies that despite differences that continue to be respected, a congruence of opinion has been reached thereby enabling decision-making processes to move ahead. From these, policies and courses of action can be formulated and dynamized.

In our 2020 worskhop, Janet described dignity as follows, "Dignity is inherent in each person and is operationalized interpersonally as respect. Dignity is moral autonomy in which each person is an end in herself, recognized as the author of his own story, and as a subject in society where dignity is operationalized as equality, inclusion, freedom, fulfillment and well-being. Dignity is blighted when persons are treated instrumentally as means to ends, subjected to domination, humiliation and other forms of violence."

Thank you so much, dearest Janet, for being a pillar of our work all the way back since 2001! Thank you for being a pillar also of this workshop, by introducing our Meet and Greet — Reflection and Connection groups (Video), by explaining the metaphor of the lotus flower (Video), and for hosting our Seeding Dignity Through Collaborative Action Dignilogues together with dear Elaine Meis! Also in our 2022 workshop, you introduced our Meet and Greet – Small Group Dignilogues and invited final reflections. You carried our 2021 workshop in so many capacities! Thank you for explaining the Connection and Reflection Groups (Video), for hosting a Bonus Session for "newcomers" together with David Yamada, as well as hosting Dignilogue 1. Thank you for your wonderful contribution to Dignilogue 3, The Interrelatedness of Dignity, Justice, Democracy, and Peace (Video), based on your recent book, Reclaimative post-conflict justice: Democratizing justice in the World Tribunal on Iraq (Cham, Switzerland: Springer International, 2021) co-authored with Dale Snauwaert! The list of your wonderful support is limitless!


• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


Dr. Janet C. Gerson is a political theorist, writer, artist, and activist educator who has taught peace education, conflict processes, transformative learning, and futures envisioning. She is the Education Director of the International Institute on Peace Education (IIPE), and former Co-Director of the Peace Education Center at Teachers College, Columbia University in New York City (2001- 2010). She has collaborated with the Morton Deutsch International Center on Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR) at at Teachers College since 1996. Her research and writing focus on the interrelatedness of dignity, justice, democracy and peace.

Janet came to the talk titled Humiliation and the Roots of Violence that Evelin Lindner gave at the MD-ICCCR on December 17, 2001, 3.30 pm, upon the invitation of Betty Reardon, attended by Morton Deutsch, among others. She particiated in Evelin Lindner’s first conference that was hosted by Morton Deutsch at the MD-ICCCR in 2003, and she was part of Morton Deutsch's last project, titled Imagine a Global Human Community (Video, December 11, 2013 | transcript, see the pledge Morton Deutsch brought to the 2013 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 5-6, 2013).

As a Board Member of HumanDHS, Janet co-hosts Dignity Now circles in New York City since 2015, initiated by Michael Britton with Judit Révész and Chipamong Chowdhury. The first meeting took place in Janet Gerson's NYC art gallery home on November 14, 2015, on the occasion of Gaby Saab's return to the city.

Thank you very much for your important contribution to this book:
"Reclaiming Common Bases of Human Dignity." In Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations: Essays on Dignity Studies in Honor of Evelin G. Lindner. Edited by Chipamong Chowdhury, Michael Britton, and Linda Hartling. Chapter 4. (Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2019)

   

Jean-Damascène Gasanabo, New York City, Kigali, Rwanda

Message from Evelin Lindner: How wonderful it was to have you with us in our workshop, dear Damas! Thank you so much for sharing your deeply touching and extremely valuable experiences with us! Professor Pierre Dasen introduced us in Geneva in 1999, and we have kept in touch since. You kindly attended our 2005 Dignity Conference in Berlin and contributed with an important foundational talk to our 2015 Dignity Conference in Kigali.


• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


Jean-Damascène Gasanabo (Damas) has a PhD in Education from the University of Geneva, Switzerland (2004) and his thesis pertains to the analysis of history textbooks and the construction of exclusive identities in Rwanda from 1962 to 1994. The Government of Rwanda appointed him as Director General in charge of the Research and Documentation Centre on Genocide, starting on May 21, 2012. The Centre is within the National Commission for the Fight against Genocide.

   


Kathleen Modrowski and Stephen P. Marks, New York City and New Delhi, India

Message from Evelin Lindner: Thank you so much, dear Kathleen and Stephen, for joining us in our workshop! We met for the first time December 27, 2001, at Shulamit Koenig's house in the Upper West End! Since then, your path has led you many places, and now you are doing important work in India. What a gift to have your support for our global dignity work!

• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


Kathleen A. Modrowski is a social anthropologist. She is Professor and Dean at the Jindal School of Liberal Arts and Humanities in the Capital Region of Delhi, India. She has been Professor and Director of the Friends World Program at Long Island University, Southampton Campus, New York. She is also an Advisor to the People's Movement for Human Rights Education. Kathleen Modrowski earned her B.A. from the University of Toledo, her Diploma of High Studies and M.A. from the University of Paris V, and her ABD from the Ecole de Haute Etudes en Sciences Sociales

   

Laura McGrew, Washington, District of Columbia, U.S.A.

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dear Laura, it was great to have you with us for the first time in our 2010 workshop! We are so glad that you could come together with Gay Rosenblum-Kumar to our 2023 workshop! What a gift! Your work is so important in these times of crises!

• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


Laura McGrew, PhD, is an independent consultant and researcher. She earned her PhD in Peace Studies from Coventry University, Coventry, UK, with the thesis topic An Analysis of Reconciliation in Cambodia: The Role of Third Party Interventions. In 2023, she kindly wrote, "I have worked for more than 25 years in post-conflict countries (Cambodia, Rwanda, Sri Lanka, Afghanistan, Nepal, etc.) on various types of human rights, reconciliation and coexistence projects. I completed a PhD in 2011, with a dissertation looking at community reconciliation in Cambodia, and have been doing a variety of conflict analyses, as well as research on transitional justice."

   

Mara Alagic, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kansas, U.S.A.

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Mara explained, "Supporting each other, globally and locally, ubuntu, being part of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies ... "

In 2020, Mara defined dignity as follows: "A way of human existence..."

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dear Mara, we are so thankful to Adair Linn Nagata for bringing you to us in 2008! Thank you for being a pillar of our work since then, and for being a core member of the Digni-Planning Team for many of our workshops! You joined us in our Dignity Conferences in Dubrovnik in 2016 and in Amman in 2022, and in almost every New York workshop. Thank you for supporting also this 2023 workshop! We will also never forget your valuable contribution to Dignilogue 1 in the 2020 workshop: Dignity Studies: Reimagining Learning in of World of Crises (Video)


• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


Mara Alagic (2021)
A Pivotal Moment for the Future of World Dignity University (Video | Text)
Contribution to Dignilogue 4 of the 2021 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Virtual at Columbia University, New York City, December 9 – 11, 2021.

   

Marlin Mattson and Robert Dickerson, New York City

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dear Marlin and Robert, what a gift your presence in our workshop was! Thank you so much for the privilege! We met in the Metropolitan Opera on October 28, 2023, you invited me to spend Thanksgiving with you, you came to my book talk in Gottesmann Libraries on November 2, 2023, and now you joined us in our workshop! Your sensitivity for dignity and its violation by humiliation is invaluable for us!


• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


Marlin R. A. Mattson, MD, is Professor Emeritus of Clinical Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medicine and prior to retirement was Associate Vice-chair for Compliance in the Department of Psychiatry for Weill Cornell Medical College. Trained in Psychiatry at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital's Payne Whitney Clinic, he has spent his entire career at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center. Through this period, he has been actively involved with quality assurance, peer review, continuous quality improvement, patient safety, standards of care, accreditation, risk management, and utilization review.

Robert D. Dickerson, MD, is a rheumatologist.

   

Martha Eddy, New York City

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Martha explained, "Compassion compassion compassion and truthful dialogue."

Dignity (2020): "Dignity is internal — I know I have value and purpose. external — I can dignify others by being caring and curious without judgement."

Martha Eddy, RSMT, CMA, Ed.D., is a movement therapist, exercise physiologist lecturer, author and international speaker. She is Honorary Adjunct Professor of BioBehavioral Sciences at Teachers College, Columbia University. In 2019, she joined the Marymount Manhattan College as Visiting Artist-in-Residence and was named the First Geraldine Ferraro Fellow on Social Justice and Movement  as part of MMC’s Ferraro Institute for Breakthrough Civic Leadership. Eddy is the founder and director of the Center for Kinesthetic Education (CKE) in New York City and brings to the fields of health, wellness and education her strong belief in the power of movement and somatic – or body-mind-spirit awareness – to enhance lives and build connections within and across communities. She does this with a racial and cultural equity lens.

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dearest Martha, what a gift that Pascal Rocha and Karen Bradley brought you to us in 2010! Thank you for offering your invaluable expertise to our global dignity community since then! Thank you for brilliantly leading the Small Group Dignilogue Movement for Building Movements: Engagement and Collaboration, Including the Arts during this 2023 workshop! We will also never forget your DigniStretch Activity on Day Two of the 2020 workshop (Video) and your "Message to the World" on Day Three (Video)! Thank you for pre-recording your DigniCalm and DigniStretch activities on December 4, 2020! Thank you also for contributing with your Rise Up: Cancer Survivor/Thriver Dance, created on September 29, 2020!


• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


As introduction to your work, you recommend How to Be Alone...
Thank you for your profound global dignity work: Somatic Resources for Stressful Times | Global Water Dances Mission | Global Water Dances (GWD) YouTube Channel | Global Water Dance: Documentary, 3 minutes | Global Water Dance, 12 minutes

   

Peter Barus, Jacksonville, Whitingham, Vermont, U.S.A.

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Peter responded by saying, "Connection. Being 'out here' with you."

At the 2020 workshop, Peter described dignity as "a question in which to live."

Message from Evelin Lindner: We are very glad, dear Peter, that our dear Howard Richards brought you to our global dignity community in 2019! And that you drove all the way from Vermont to be with us in this 2023 workshop was more than we could imagine! Thank you!!!


• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


Thank you so much for sharing your reflections during the coffee break of Day Three of this workshop (Video) and for sharing more thoughts at the end of the workshop (Video)!

Thank you also very much for your touching and profound "Message to the World" in 2020!

   

Sarah Efird, Bronx, New York City

Message from Evelin Lindner: A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Sarah! We are very happy to have you with us!


• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


Sarah Efird (pen name Refried Bean) lives in the Bronx and enjoys writing poetry, cooking, and volunteering. She has worked in a bookstore for twelve years and has an MFA in Writing from Vermont College of Fine Arts. She mostly writes humor about food, animals, heaven, Christianity, and mental illness and has e-published several books of poetry, a book of stories, a novel, and three picture books.

   

Shahid Khan, Brooklyn — Little Pakistan

Dear Shahid, you are a dear member of our dignity community since many years! We were blown away by your support! You asked your wife to prepare food for all of us in the room! Our participants on Zoom became extremely jealous! We are deeply thankful for your initiative to organize one of our future conferences in Pakistan!


• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


Shahid Khan came to United States in 2010 and has established a non-profit organization, National Youth Organization of Pakistan Inc., in 2014. [read more]

   

Sharon Steinborn, Las Cruces, New Mexico, U.S.A.

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Sharon explained in 2021, "Our belief/need to feel that we are separate, distinct, completely individualistic humans living on this planet leads to isolation and fear; an existential threat of aloneness and the resultant anxiety. That we are truly and deeply one and connected to each other physically, emotionally and spiritually is what leads to healing. What hurts one hurts the other. When I accept that truth it makes it more difficult to harm another. Dignity is a communal responsibility."

Message from Evelin Lindner: How wonderful that you found us in 2021, dear Sharon! What a gift you and your work are to our global community! It is so immensely valuable that you are writing about humiliation! Thank you so much for coming all the way from New Mexico to be with us in our workshop and for brilliantly leading the Small Group Digniloguetitled Humiliation Trauma that you had conceived together with Peter Pollard (who unfortunately was hindered to come to New York). Thank you for your wonderful work and enriching support, dearest Sharon!


• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop


• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


Sharon Steinborn is a licensed marriage and family therapist who specializes in the treatment of anxiety disorders. Underlying many of those experiencing anxiety, certainly Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, has been trauma associated with humiliation. Humiliation is often the underlying trauma/cause of suffering. Sharon works to help people understand and heal from this profound loss of value and sense of self.

   


Stefanie Overbeck and Mel Wymore, Lausanne, Switzerland, and New York City

Dearest Stefanie, I am still so thankful that we met on January 11, 2014, at the Open Space gathering in Steyerberg in Germany in honor of our dear Margrit Kennedy. In 2018 you visited me together with your dear husband Mel in my place in New York's Upper West End. On December 1, 2019, you invited me to your Poly Money Podcast with Mel Wymore, Stefanie Overbeck and Riley Paul, published on March 24, 2020. Dear Stefanie and Mel, I so much admire and appreciate your commitment to working for dignity!


• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


Stefanie B. Overbeck is an Innovative Architect 4 the CAREconomy, also "Pod of Gold" host, founder, impact investor, partner, spouse, friend, and listener. She kindly wrote on November 30, 2021: "As a trained architect I ran a green architectural firm for 15 years until I became aware that on the basis of our current prevailing financial system green architecture stays an illusion. I moved to NYC to co-found GameChangers NGO with my husband Mel. The basic premise of gamechangers is that early and on-going education about regenerative economics is essential to building a fair and sustainable world of commerce, one that reverses climate change and mitigates the looming effects of extreme disparity."

Mel Wymore has been organizing collective action for over 30 years. Mel holds a BS Math, BA Comms, MS Systems Engr., and is certified in Sustainable Business Strategy (HBS, 2022). In 2018, Mel and Stefanie Overbeck co-founded GameChangers, a nonprofit that develops games, workshops, and organizational tools that empower individuals and organizations to transform societal systems and maximize their positive impact on global well-being.

   

Zuzka Kurtz and Geoffrey Hug, New York City and Upstate New York

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dearest Zuzka, I am so glad that I met you in the Rubin Museum on December 2, 2006, and that I had the opportunity to learn from you since then! in 2010, you created and directed The Inner Sole, a piece about the memories of a concentration camp survivor, and the stories she passes down to her daughter.


• Kindly click here to see Anna Strout's 185 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see Evelin Lindner's 30 photos of the in-person part of the workshop
• Kindly click here to see the 35 screenshots of the online part of the workshop


Zuzka Kurtz is a producer/Director, a Czech born multi-media artist and filmmaker residing in New York City and Upstate New York. Zuzka and Geoffrey Hug kindly offer their feature length documentary film titled Hudson, America, where they follow a group of Bangladeshi students in Upstate NY from 2016 – 2022 (free link for the dignity community upon request from zk@zuzkakurtz.com).

 

 

Participants (alphabetical according to the first name) invited to join in person (limited space), but unfortunately unable to attend


   

Anastasia Sarantos Taskin, New Jersey, U.S.A.

Anastasia Sarantos Taskin is a former private investigator and Massachusetts Public Defender, who has maintained a general criminal and civil litigation practice in Massachusetts and New York for more than 30 years and a commercial, bioethics and community mediation practice since 2015.

Thank you for beign a pillar of our dignity work since 2016, dear Anastasia!

   

Andrea Bartoli, New York City

Andrea Bartoli is the President of the Sant’Egidio Foundation for Peace and Dialogue, representing the Community of Sant’Egidio, a lay Catholic association that was originally founded in Rome and now with a worldwide membership dedicated to social service and peacebuilding. He has been a member of the Community of Sant’Egidio since 1970. He is also the Executive Adviser of the Soka Institute for Global Solutions (SIGS). [read more]

Dear Andrea, we thank you so very much for being such a force-for-good more than 20 years ago! YOUR encouragement during the first years of this workshop series enabled us to keep it going for more than 20 years! THANK YOU!!!

   

Angelique Santiago, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

Angelique wishes for dignity in education and learning, and through Dialogue in conflict transformation.

A very warm welcome to our workshop, dear Angelique! We are very happy to have you with us!

   

Antony D'Oliveira, Global

Antony's YouTube channel says: "Be the guinea pig of your own experience"

Thank you, dear Ariel, for introducing us to Antony! A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Antony! We are very happy to have you with us!

   

Harriet Jackson, New York City

Harriet Jackson is an educator, a historian, and an interlocutor, who connects educators, thought leaders and donors, while engaging in strategic thinking to build educational programs to overcome hate, racism, and antisemitism.

Dearest Harriet, we are immensely grateful to you for supporting our dignity work all the way back to 2015!

   

Myriam Vargas de Luna, Québec, Canada

Myriam is a Mexican Clinical Psychologist living in Canada working with asylum seekers and victims of organized violence from all over the world. She is a member of the Ordre des Psychologues du Québec, and refers her refugee claimant patients to Collective bienvenue / Welcome collective, "I refer all my refugee claimant patients to these information sessions. I see them return to therapy with a sense of relief and security, with less fear and more confidence in knowing what to expect at the hearing. You are undoubtedly contributing to their path of healing from all that they have experienced in their country of origin," Collective bienvenue / Welcome collective, 2022-23 annual report.

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Myriam! We are very happy to have you with us!

   

Peter Pollard, Hatfield, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

What does "dignity through solidarity" mean to you? Peter wrote in 2021:
"I think it speaks to the notion that Dignity must be extended universally and unconditionally. While embracing a commitment to accountability for harmful actions, we must resist the impulse to "otherize" those who threaten or cause harm to us and those we love. Together, we must commit to humanizing those we disagree with or find threatening, while challenging harmful behaviors."

At the 2020 workshop, Peter described dignity as "positive self-regard — a birth right."

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dear Peter, we are so glad that Donna Hicks brought you to us and we thank you so very much for joining us in our 2018, 2020, 2021, 2022, and 2023 workshops! Since then, we cannot imagine our dignity work without you! Thank you for conceiving the important Dignilogue titled Humiliation Trauma together with Sharon Steinborn for our 2023 workshop!

Thank you also for sharing:
1in6 Thursday: "Good" and "Evil"...Not So Fast, by Peter Pollard, Joyful Heart Foundation, March 22, 2012 (Pdf)
1in6 Thursday: Decriminalizing Trauma: Some New Alternatives to “Fight, Flight or Freeze,” by Peter Pollard, Joyful Heart Foundation, October 23, 2014 (Pdf)
• "Fighting a Contagious Disease in Boston," by Peter Pollard, Social Innovations Journal, December 4, 2017 (Pdf)

In the registration for our 2022 workshop, you kindly wrote:
My work has been focused on supporting dignity and healing for those who have been exposed to violence and trauma, with a particular focus on males.
Several simple (though certainly not simple to implement), trauma-responsive guidelines for working with males have emerged. Most relate to emotional and physical safety:
• Promote dignity by eliminating shaming as a tool to motivate change.
• Provide males cover for walking in the door. Frame services around initially establishing safe, meaningful relationships related to something other than victimization.
• In our families and circles, self-consciously support norm changes in rigidity about masculinity. Expand the emotional survival options for men when they feel vulnerable or face conflict.
• Explore the many ways that fear has been an historic driver of harmful personal interactions, social policy and laws.
• Increase knowledge about positive, evidence-based, alternative solutions to motivate changes in behavior and encourage healing.
• Advise less. Listen more
"I believe the quest for dignity is the foundation of all emotions, behaviors and actions — both positive and harmful. When dignity is secure, the impulse to deflect vulnerability through dominance or violence diminishes. Openness to nuanced ideas becomes safe.

   

Rachel Miner, London, New York City

In 2019, after working with the Yazidis in Iraq, Rachel Miner observed the humanitarian gap for religious minority groups that have experienced genocide, particularly in communities where freedom of religion or belief is violated, ignored, or deemed unimportant. Rachel founded Bellwether International in London, UK, to respond to pre- and post- genocide communities who have experienced severe violations of freedom of religion or belief: "Our model is to recruit locally and implement sustainably. As such, we rely on local partners and community project leaders to collaborate on holistic solutions that ensure peace and stability for years to come. Protecting freedom of religion or belief for one is protecting human rights for all."

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Rachel! We are very happy to have you with us!

   

Rebecca (Becky) Tabaczynski, Lexington, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

What does "dignity through solidarity" mean to you?
"When people are joined together, they create a barrier to humiliation and support dignity."

We are so happy to have you with us in our dignity community, dear Becca! Thank you so very much for sharing your research on conspiracy theories in Dignilogue 2! The Threat of Conspiracy Theories (Video | Video recorded on November 29, 2021)

Rebecca (Becky) Tabaczynski holds a certificate in Global Post-Disaster Studies from the Center for Rebuilding Sustainable Communities after Disasters, under the Direction of Adenrele Awotona, at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. In 2017, Becky became connected to HumanDHS as student in the course: Human Dignity, Human Rights, and Sustainable Post-Disaster Reconstruction. Over the last year she has been donating her research skills as a gift to HumanDHS by studying conspiracy theories. She has a bachelors degree in nursing and masters degrees in counseling and business administration.

   
 

Susan Cangiano, Bronx, New York City

Susan is a Teacher at the New York City Board of Education, which is the governing body of the New York City Department of Education. She holds a Masters degree from the Mount Saint Vincent University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Thank you, dear Andrea Bartoli, for introducing Susan to our work! A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Susan! We are very happy to have you with us!

   

Tiokasin Ghosthorse, New York City

Tiokasin Ghosthorse of the Cheyenne River Lakota Nation of South Dakota is an international speaker on Peace, Indigenous, and Mother Earth perspectives. A survivor of the “Reign of Terror” from 1972 to 1976 on the Pine Ridge, Cheyenne River, and Rosebud Lakota Reservations in South Dakota and the US Bureau of Indian Affairs Boarding and Church Missionary School systems designed to “kill the Indian and save the man,” Tiokasin has a long history of Indigenous activism and advocacy. He spoke as a 15-year-old at the United Nations - Lake Geneva, Switzerland. He is an active board member of Simply Smiles, Green Cross International, and The Center for Earth Ethics. Tiokasin frequently speaks at venues such as Yale University’s School of Divinity, Ecology, and Forestry focusing on the cosmology, diversity, and perspectives on the relational/egalitarian vs. rational/hierarchal thinking processes of Western society. Tiokasin was a 2016 Nominee for a Nobel Peace Prize from the International Institute of Peace Studies and Global Philosophy. Selected for 2016 Native Arts Cultural Foundation Fellowship, a Nominee for a National Endowment for the Arts National Heritage Fellowship 2018, National Native American Hall of Fame Nominee 2018, and 2019 Indigenous Music Award Nominee for "Best Instrumental Album" for "From the Continuum." [read more]

Tiokasin Ghosthorse says (at the end of the interview), "Intuitive intelligence is indigenous intelligence. There is no 'indigenous wisdom,' this pigeonholes us!"

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Tiokasin! We are very happy to have you with us!



Participants (alphabetical according to the first name) who registered for online participation in our 2023 workshop

Albert Alejo, Rome, Italy

Jesuit Priest, Faculty of Social Sciences, Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome.
Thank you, dear Adair Nagata, for having introduced us to Albert!

Dignity means: Human rights, indigenous peoples, ecology, peace.

   

Amy Jeu, New York City

Amy Jeu is a Geoscience Laboratory Technician at Hunter College in New York City, working in higher education.

   

Andrea Brenker-Pegesa, Weserbergland, Lower Saxony, Germany

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Andrea explained, "Dignity for me is as important as my engagement for the nature. When we haven't got any respect to ourselves and to the others, we are not really strong and able enough to solve the problems around us. To gain an aim means to listen to each other and to respect each other. That makes us strong."

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dear Andrea! Thank you so much for being such a wise and loving dignifier in this world! It was a great privilege for me to meet you on the occasion of the "Klimastreik" in Hameln on September 20, 2019! I was just back from our 2019 Dignity Conference in the Amazon of Brazil and sent you the letter we received from a group of young pupils from the Irmã Theoroda school about the destruction of the Amazon. This letter touched you deeply and brought us together! Thank you for your deep sensitivity for dignity!

Thank you for being with us in our 2023 workshop! Furthermore, the lovely contributions from Hameln to our 2021 workshop came true due to your untiring support:
Dignity Now: Hameln Removes Plastic Waste from the Banks of its River Weser (World Dignity Movement channel | HumanDHS channel, recorded in September 2021, finalized on November 25, 2021)
• The Dignity Now Hameln Group sings Dona Nobis Pacem ("Grant Us Peace" in Latin) in the Chapel of Wangelist near Hameln (Hamelin) on November 8, 2021

Thank you, dear Andrea and Regina, for being such wonderful members of our DignityNowHameln group, and of contributing so wonderfully to our 2020 workshop!
Dignity Now: Hameln Presents Good Ideas from the Past and the Future for a More Sustainable Future. Thoughts Are Unchained (World Dignity Movement channel | HumanDHS channel, recorded in October and November 2020, finalized on November 21, 2020)
Die Gedanken sind Frei / Thoughts are Unchained sung by the DignityNowHameln group
This is the contribution of the DignityNowHameln group that was recorded in October and November 2020, and finalized on November 21, 2020 (World Dignity Movement channel | HumanDHS channel)

Thank you so much, dear Andrea and Regina, also for sharing your wonderful art with us!
Der Mond ist aufgegangen (Video of verse 1 on Day Two | Video of verse 2 on Day Three | Video of verse 1 + 2) Der Mond ist aufgegangen wurde 1790 vom Matthias Claudius als religiöses Abendlied geschrieben, vertont wurde es noch im selben Jahr vom Hofkapellmeister Johann A. P. Schulz. English: The moon has risen was written by Matthias Claudius in 1790 as a religious evening song, and it was set to music in the same year by the court conductor Johann A. P. Schulz.
• Hameln Sings (all vocal interludes brought together) (Video)

   

Angélica Walker, New York City and Brazil

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Angélica responded by saying, "Everything! Without solidarity 'dignity' is just an institution."

Thank you, dear Angélica, for your untiring loving support! Thank you for your important "Message to the World" (Video Day Two | Video Day Three | Video recorded on December 8, 2021)! You have always been such a wonderful Dignigardener for our "Connection/Reflection Groups!

   

Angelyn Voss, Oregon, U.S.A.

In her registration for an earlier workshop, Angelyn wrote: "As a teacher and member of society, one must exude respect to all students and individuals. Promoting dignity opens the doors to acceptance, encouragement, peace, learning, and ultimately, love." Angelyn invites everyone to visit her website www.angelynchristyvoss.com. She is happy to donate a book or a piece of artwork if that could help.

Dear Angelyn, it is such a great gift to have your support for our dignity work! You were with us in our 2018 December Workshop with your great voice (Video 1 | Video 2) and we loved to honor you (Video)!
Thank you so much for your wonderful support!

   

Anna Hamling, Fredericton, Canada

Anna Hamling, PhD, is a Professor of Culture and Media Studies at the University of New Brunswick in Canada. Her research interests include nineteenth- and twentieth-century Spanish, Russian and Latin American literature and cultures, contemporary women's art in Spain and Latin America, music and dance of Spain and Latin America and Romani Studies.

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Anna Hamling! We are very happy to have you with us!

 

Antonie Dvorakova, Czech Republic

Antonie Dvorakova is a Social Sciences Researcher, Cultural Psychology Instructor, Indigenous Nations Psychologies Promoter, and a Belonging, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Consultant.

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Antonie!

   

Ariel Lublin, New York City

Ariel Lublin is an Associate Principal at Consensus - an international negotiation, conflict-resolution, and peace-building firm – where she consults, leads trainings, and conducts peace-building dialogues for international organizations, governments, Fortune 500 companies, law enforcement agencies, and NGOs. She also teaches at Columbia University in the School of International Public Affairs (SIPA) and in the Negotiation and Conflict Resolution Masters Degree Program, and she serves as a custody/visitation mediator for NYC Family Court.

You are such a wonderful core pillar of our work, dear Ariel, since 2004! We have no words to thank you!

   

Azza Karam, New York City, Global

Dr. Azza Karam is the secretary general of Religions for Peace International and professor of religion and development at the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam.

A very warm welcome to our workshop, dear Azza! Your work is a shining beacon of dignity in the world! It is such a privilege to know you since such a long time, since our Cairo time in 1985!

   

Beth Boynton, Dover, New Hampshire, U.S.A.

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Beth explained, "We are creating a rippling effect of dignity throughout the world. A way of being together."

Thank you so much, dearest Beth, for always inviting us into "Dignity Movement"!

We are so grateful to you, dearest Beth, for hosting the Dignilogue titled Giving and Receiving Simple Acts of Kindness as Seeds of Dignity in our 2023 workshop, and for reporting on it so wonderfully at the end! (Video)

Thank you also for offering a wonderful Bonus Session in our 2021 workshop, titled "Warm-up Activities for Engaging & Connecting Your Groups on Zoom" to us!
Thank you for sharing a few samples noting how the learning context can vary:
• Building-situational-awareness
• Hello-goodbye-ease-into-improv-activities
Dignity Exchange: An Experiential Activity for Promoting Dignity Everywhere

• Thank you for sharing also a brief update on your work on June 2nd, 2020. You and your colleague Liz Korabek-Emerson piloted a virtual field trip with Creative Mornings where you did an hour of mindfulness and improv.
• Thank you also for making us aware and commenting on this article: "Elevating Dignity as a Goal for Health System Achievement in the COVID-19 Era and in the Future"

 

Bonnie Selterman, Greater New York City Area

You are among our deepest and most complex thinkers and most loving nurturers of dignity, dear Bonnie! We cannot imagine our workshop series without you anymore! You generously joined us in 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022, and now, our 2023 workshop! Thank you for sharing your profound reflections also in this workshop, as always!

No Such Thing, a spoken poem composed for this year's workshop (Video recorded in November 2023 | Pdf)

Ways of Learning, a spoken poem composed for the specific theme of this year's workshop (Video | spoken recording on November 18, 2022 | Pdf)

Dignity Through Solidarity — A Spoken Essay and Poem (Video | Text | Spoken recording on November 21, 2021)
…shall we see the light of possibility
Through ingenuity
Through human dignity
Respecting ecology
The life-sustaining
Strategy
Of solidarity?

Escaping Complicity — A Poem (Video | Pdf | Spoken recording on November 21, 2020)
Notes on Human Dignity as a Concept That Can Be Taught, reflections prepared in May 2019 for the 2019 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 5 – 6, 2019.

Message from Evelin Lindner: I am so thankful to Maria Volpe for bringing us together, dear Bonnie! Thank you for coming to my talk Understanding and Addressing Humiliation, December 2, 2010, convened by our esteemed Maria Volpe at her monthly breakfast meeting (since 9/11 on the first Thursday of each month) at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City (see the 2010 pictures)! I will never forget when you took me to hear Bill McKibben speak in the Tishman Auditorium at the New School University Center, on November 10, 2016, and our conversation afterwards. In the book that I am finalizing now, I am widely quoting you, among others from the questions you asked us in 2018.

   

Brian Ward, Christchurch, New Zealand/Aotearoa

What does "dignity through solidarity" mean to you? "It means the ultimate solidarity that equal dignity offers all humans."

Dear Brian, we will never forget how generously you hosted our 2011 Dignity Conference in Dunedin! You are a gift to our dignity work all the way back since 2007, when you found us on the internet!

thank you SO MUCH for your great gift to our 2022 workshop! Dignity Dialogue plaques!



Thank you so much also for sharing the poem The River of Life at our 2021 workshop, which you had composed at the occasion of the passing of your dear mother at the age of 101 (Video):

The River of Life
I float
I float on the river of life
I get washed under only to rise again
I bump into the bank only to bounce back
I can steer myself but cannot steer others
I can only show others how I steer myself
It’s wonderful I am part of the river
And once I reach the river mouth
I become part of the sea of everything
That make all journeys possible

Thank you also very much for sharing your thoughts at the end of our 2021 workshop (Video)!

   

Camille Butterfield Elliott, Springfield, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

Camille Butterfield Elliott kindly wrote in 2020: My name is Camille Elliott and I am a student affairs professional with 30 years of higher education experience. I am currently a mediator in training and have volunteered with conflict mediation firm assist consumers with fostering creative problem solving through colloaborative dialogue. I am also new to restorative justice practices for problem solving in healing in youth-based conflicts. 

A very warm welcome to our workshop, dear Camille!

   

Christine de Michele, North Carolina, U.S.A.

Dignity (2020): "Equity and a good life for all living beings."

Thank you so much for bringing your amazing art to our workshops every year since 2014, dear Christine! How happy we are that Anna Strout brought you to us!

Thank you so much for your contribution to the 2020 workshop:
Christine de Michele Sings About the Black Community's Significance for Jazz Music on Day Two of this Workshop, in Honor of Tony Gaskew's Talk the Day Before (Video)

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dearest Christine, I will never forget how you lifted our spirits with just your voice, without words, in an interlude during our 2016 workshop!

 

Carol Smaldino, Colorado, U.S.A., Italy

In our 2020 workshop, Carol defined dignity as follows, "The right to be respected as a matter of being alive, human and otherwise. And to give that respect as well."

Carol Smaldino is a practicing psychotherapist working with parents and families, who writes on the connections between emotions and politics and loves to translate important concepts into practical possibilities. She loves to meet new people and is starting a podcast called Human Climate.

Message from Evelin Lindner: Your wisdom always deeply enriches us, dear Carol, since you first found our work in 2009! We so much appreciate your way of throwing light on our dark sides, on our shadows! Thank you so much for your brilliant contribution to Dignilogue 1 on December 9, 2021, titled Solidarity with Our Emotions in the Human Climate (Video)!

Your pieces on the platforms of Huffington Post and Medium are must-reads for everyone! Here are some examples:

The Human Climate Facing the Divisions Inside Us and Between Us, Carol Smaldino's book published in January 2019 in Dignity Press
• "If They Had Only Known: If We had Only Known, and Now that we Do," by Carol Smaldino, Medium, December 1, 2021
• "Mental Health Awareness Month in a Climate of Denial," by Carol Smaldino, Huffington Post, May 11, 2016
• "In Every Generation: What Independence Day Means to Me," by Carol Smaldino, Huffington Post, June 29, 2017
• "Addressing the 'Toxins in Our Hearts': A Conversation with Mary Gordon, Founder of Roots of Empathy," by Carol Smaldino, Huffington Post, December 21, 2017
• "Cancer Comedy," by Carol Smaldino, Huffington Post, July 12, 2014

We are very proud to have your book published in Dignity Press:
Smaldino, Carol (2019). The Human Climate: Facing the Divisions Inside Us and Between Us (Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press)

We cannot imagine our workshop series without you and your husband anymore, dear Carol, since you first joined us in 2010, then in 2011, 2012, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, and now! Our deep gratitude goes to you!

And thank you for interviewing us for your Conversations on The Human Climate on October 22, 2021!
The Human Climate: Carol Smaldino with Guest Evelin Lindner and Linda Hartling
Premiere May 16, 2022 (recorded on October 22, 2021)

   

Catharina Carvalho, Recife, Brazil, and New Jersey, U.S.A.

Message from Linda Hartling: Dearest Catharina, thank you so much for offering your support for our dear Francisco Gomes de Matos (Video)! You are the daughter of Eduardo Carvalho, the Executive Director of the ABA-Associação Brasil América in Recife, Brazil, of which Francisco Gomes de Matos is a co-founder. As you are based in the U.S.A., you kindly offer to make sure that Francisco Gomes de Matos will receive his award plaque in Recife! Thank you so much, dear Catharina!

Catharina Carvalho, Ph.D., SSP, is a Trilingual Psychology Clinician and Psychological Assessment Supervisor at the Trinitas Regional Medical Center in New Jersey, U.S.A. As a clinician from Brazil who studied in Texas and with a Ph.D. in Psychology, she works with children and adolescents and their families at the behavioral health unit in a non-profit hospital in New Jersey, serving the immigrant population, the uninsured, and the disenfranchised.

   

Dan Shapiro, Boston, U.S.A.

Dan Shapiro is the founder and director of the Harvard International Negotiation Program and teaches a highly evaluated course on negotiation at Harvard College. He instructs psychology interns at Harvard Medical School/McLean Hospital and leads executive education sessions at the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School, Harvard Kennedy School, and Harvard Medical School/McLean Hospital. He also has served on the faculty at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, and at the Sloan School of Management at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. [read more]

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dear Dan, you kindly participated in our 2004 NY workshop and on November 19, 2008, we had a meeting in your office at Harvard. You have no ida how much we value your ongoing support!

 

Dan Vaughan, Sedgefield, South Africa

Dan Vaughan is the Former Aide to Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu and the author of the 2022 memoir This One Thing: Journeying with Desmond Tutu, dedicated “To Desmond Mpilo Tutu, who taught us hope, and the world this one thing, to love” (book launch at the Desmond Tutu Legacy Foundation Museum, December 21, 2022). He is a South African, born in Cape Town, and in 1976, he was invited to join the staff of the South African Council of Churches (SACC) where he worked under Archbishop Tutu for 7 years, eventually as his Assistant General Secretary. He resigned after Tutu left the SACC, to work in the Order of St John (St John Ambulance) as Regional and National Director. In 2003, Archbishop Tutu asked him to join him in his office in Milnerton, near Cape Town. He served there as his travel aide and manager of his office until 2011 when Tutu retired from active involvement in international affairs.
Dan Vaughan and a small team are currently (2024) engaged in developing a process that will hopefully stimulate the teaching of what must be regarded as Archbishop Tutu’s greatest legacy, the call of his later years that we love even those we would regard as our enemies.


Kindly click on the book cover to see it larger

Late Archbishop Desmond Tutu most generously contributed with a Foreword to Evelin Lindner's third book (2010), Gender, Humiiation, and Global Security, whose message was BIG LOVE. Dan and Evelin were in touch via email as far back as 2008.

Dear Dan, we are overjoyed to have you in our 2023 workshop! Thank you so much for being with us!

   

Darcia Narvaez, Notre Dame, Indiana, U.S.A.

Darcia Narvaez is Professor of Psychology at the University of Notre Dame who focuses on moral development and flourishing from an interdisciplinary perspective, integrating anthropology, neuroscience, clinical, developmental and educational sciences. Her earlier careers include professional musician, business owner, classroom music teacher, classroom Spanish teacher and seminarian, among other things. [read more]

Dear Darcia, you have no idea how much we value your work and support! You are a true dignifier in this world!

   

David Yamada, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

David C. Yamada is the recipient of the 2015 HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award. David is a professor of law and director of the New Workplace Institute at Suffolk University Law School in Boston. David is a globally recognized scholar and authority on workplace bullying and worker dignity. At our annual workshops, he has frequently shared topics such as workplace bullying and abuse, dignity at work, and therapeutic jurisprudence. See this article in the journal of the American Bar Association, "David Yamada is fighting to end workplace bullying," by Amanda Robert, ABA Journal, December 1, 2021.

Thank you, dear David, for being a beacon of dignity in the world, a pillar of our global dignity work, and a pillar of this workshop series since 2007! We celebrate you as the new Director of the World Dignity University initiative! HOORAY!

Thank you so much for facilitating a "Workshop within a Workshop" titled Effecting Change: Maintaining, While Venturing Beyond, Our Safe Circles in our 2023 conference (Video 1 online | Video 2 room | Video 3 online | Video 4 postscript | Video thank you! | Pdf)!

Thank you equally much that you facilitated a "Workshop within a Workshop" titled Non-Degree Higher and Adult Education to Advance Human Dignity in our 2022 conference that was dedicated to the World Dignity University initiative (Video | Pdf)!

Thank you so much as well for your many contributions also to our 2021 workshop! You were part of Dignilogue 3, you hosted Dignilogue 4, and you offered a Bonus Session for "newcomers" together with Janet Gerson!

Dignilogue 3: Reframing Global Leadership in a Dignitarian Context (Video)
Yamada, David C. (2021). "Therapeutic Jurisprudence: Foundations, Expansion, and Assessment." In University of Miami Law Review, 75 (3), p. 660 (Pdf)

Dignilogue 4: Yamada, David C. (2021). Advancing the Promise of the World Dignity University, November 2021 (version 1) (Video 1 | Video 2)

Thank you, dear David, for your wonderful post-2020-workshop blog "A welcomed online workshop helps to conclude a challenging year" (Link | Pdf). In 2020, you were a pillar of Dignilogue 1 and Dignilogue 2 in particular! And we had the privilege of enjoying your wonderful musical voice (Text | Video)! We have no words to thank you!

Thank you sharing this work in 2020, dear David:
• "Should Public Policy Center on Society’s Well-Being?" by David Yamada, The American Commentator, October 2020 (Pdf)
• Yamada, David C. (2019). "Therapeutic Jurisprudence, Intellectual Activism and Legislation." In The Methodology and Practice of Therapeutic Jurisprudence, edited by Nigel Stobbs, Lorana Bartels, and Michel Vols. Chapter 5. Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press. (Pdf)
• Yamada, David C. (2018). "On Anger, Shock, Fear, and Trauma: Therapeutic Jurisprudence as a Response to Dignity Denials in Public Policy." In International Journal of Law and Psychiatry. doi: 10.1016/j.ijlp.2018.06.009 (Pdf). This article asserts that when policymaking processes, outcomes, and implementations stoke fear, anxiety, and trauma, they often lead to denials of human dignity.

Thank you also so much for your important contribution to this book:
"Growing Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies: Without Falling Prey to Neoliberal Norms." In Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations: Essays on Dignity Studies in Honor of Evelin G. Lindner. Edited by Chipamong Chowdhury, Michael Britton, and Linda Hartling. Chapter 2. (Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2019)

   

Donna Fujimoto, Osaka, Japan

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Donna explained, "To me it means learning about the plight of others — not just second-hand through reading or documentaries--but by meeting with those who have lived experience and they can open our collective eyes to what is happening in our world."

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dear Donna, we are so privileged to be connected with you! SIETAR Japan brought us together! You kindly recorded my guest lecture titled How Intercultural Communicators Can Contribute to Realizing Humiliation-Free Global Peace at the SIETAR Japan Kansai Chapter's June Meeting on June 17, 2007, at the Takatsuki Shiritsu Sogo Shimin Koryu Center in Osaka, Japan (see pictures). I will never forget our lovely meeting in a small Korean restaurant near Tamatsukuri Station at the Osaka Loop Line, after Morinomiya, on July 4, 2007! Later, you kindly joined us in our 2014 Dignity Conference in Chiang Mai and, together with your husband, in our 2017 Dignity Conference in India. We miss you! Welcome back!  

   

Elenor Richter-Lyonette, St. Sulpice, Switzerland

What does "dignity through solidarity" mean to you?
"Dignity through solidarity means to me that I am ready to listen and to express support. This may be practical support or simple empathy."

Elenor Richter Lyonette is an independent Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) specialist and has completed many monitoring, mid-term and final evaluations. Prior to setting up her own firm, she worked for 7 years in programme management positions and in agency coordination in UNHCR, UNICEF, WHO, and UNOCA, and for 26 years with bilateral agencies and in the private sector. [read more]

A very warm welcome to our workshop, dear Elenor! It is a privilege to know you since 2010, when Renate Wilke-Launer introduced us, and we met for the first time in Prangins, Switzerland! We so much admire your amazing global work experience!

   

Elizabeth Sparks, Boston, U.S.A.

Elizabeth Sparks is the retired Associate Dean for Graduate Student Services, Graduate Admissions & Financial Aid at Boston College. Her research interests are prevention and intervention with children affected by community violence; multicultural issues in counseling psychology; the intersection of culture, race, and feminist psychology.

Elizabeth has co-authored a paper together with Linda Hartling in 2002, Relational-Cultural Practice: Working in a Nonrelational World. Work in Progress, No. #97. Wellesley, MA: Stone Center Working Papers Series.

Elizabeth kindly wrote in November 2023: "My interest in the topics of dignity have increased over the last few years as we have witnessed such violence and unrest across the world. I want to connect to an organization that is working towards addressing compassion and peace throughout the world."

Dear Elizabeth, a very warm welcome to our workshop!

   

Ella Autti, Rovaniemi, Finland

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Ella explained, "The actions, words and language I take and use every day towards my fellow human beings."

In our 2020 workshop, Ella defined dignity as follows, "Dignity for me is very practical, treating other people with respect and with acceptance.
"

Ella Nygård Autti wishes to help healthcare organizations to have mutually respectful and humane work cultures. She is currently undertaking PhD research into shame and humiliation in healthcare work communities at the University of Lapland, Finland. She aims to pursue an understanding of the systems and dialogues that humiliate or cause shame in work settings. She holds a master's degree in social sciences and has a background in marketing and communications.

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dearest Ella, what a gift you are to our dignity work! You have so many talents! From singing to graphic design! Thank you so much for singing Over the Rainbow for us in our 2022 workshop (Video), and for contributing with Cover Me in Sunshine" to our 2023 workshop (Video)!

We simply love what you have created here:

   

Frederikke Hoffmann Schrøder, Malmö, Sweden

Frederikke Hoffmann Schrøder is an anthropologist and music educator interested in dignity, social justice, and creative arts activism.

Welcome to our workshop, dear Frederikke, for the first time! We are very happy to have you with us!

 



Fonkem, Michael Fonkem Achankeng I, Appleton, Wisconsin, U.S.A., and Ruler of Atoabechied in the former British Southern Cameroons

What does "dignity through solidarity" mean to you? "Working together for the dignity of all."

Dear Fonkem, we are in awe at the scope of your dignifying service in this world!
Thank you for making it possible for us to understand the difficult situation in former British Southern Cameroon:

• Achankeng, Fonkem (2013). "Conflict and Conflict Resolution in Africa: Engaging the Colonial Factor." In African Journal on Conflict Resolution, 13 (2), pp. 11–37.

• A summary of the situation in Cameroon: Cameroon Burning: The Unseen War, full documentary, BBC Africa Eye, June 25, 2018, "Hundreds of shocking mobile phone videos from Cameroon have surfaced in the past six months. They are coming from the English speaking part of the country, where rebels are fighting to form an independent state called "Ambazonia". BBC Africa Eye have analysed these films, shedding fresh light on who is responsible for the violence."



Paradise Lost? A Political History of British Southern Cameroons from 1916 to 1972, by Nfor Ngala Nfor (Austin, TX: Pan-African University Press, 2020).

The Anglophone Problem in Cameroon: The Change from Crisis to Conflict, and a Possible Way Forward to Resolution, by Billy Agwanda and Uğur Yasin Asal, 2021.
   

Francisco Cardoso, Portugal

Francisco Cardoso is a psychologist and professor at the Education and Psychology Department of the University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro (UTAD) in Portugal. He teaches motivation and emotion at the experimental and clinical psychology laboratory, and clinical intervention in adults. With respect to general domains, his interests are the study of the interrelation between affect, cognition, and extended cognition. In clinical fields, he develops studies in phenomenological psychology, harm behaviors effects, such as humiliation, and new developments of psychotherapy, such as ecopsychotherapy. He is an invited member of the UNESCO chair on Geoparks at UTAD, the LOCUS group, and is honored to be invited to the Global Research Team of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) group. See ResearchGate for some of his publications. He has worked with Linda Hartling and her Humiliation Inventory.

A very warm welcome to our workshop, dear Francisco!

   
 

Gabriela Hofmeyer, San Francisco, California

Gabriela Hofmeyer is a student at the Western Institute for Social Research (WISR). Her special areas of interest, study, or research are: Resilience and Community Education, Arts, Music, Fractal Studies, Domestic Violence Interventions, Child Abuse Interventions, Adverse Childhood Experiences, Science and Technology, Inclusion, and Disability Studies and Research.

Welcome, dear Gabriela!

   

Georg-Wilhelm Geckler, Hameln (Hamelin), Germany

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Georg explained, "I try to be in solidarity especially to those people who need it most."

Georg-Wilhelm Geckler is an engineer who worked in the oil and gas business and in planning depositories for radioactive waste. He is now helping Yezidi refugees from Iraq in Germany. He is a member of the DignityNowHameln and ambassador for the EU climate pact. Together with friends and relatives, Georg creates videos that offer established knowledge and hopeful visions to audiences wherever this is wished for or needed. His message is: Stop climate warming and burning fossil fuels and instead foster renewable energy, stop wars and humiliation and instead work for dignity world wide. Children and students should learn in dignity, because this prevents them from learning to harm other persons, which, in turn, can help to bring dignity to the world in the future.

At the 2020 workshop, Georg described dignity as follows, "For me dignity is a condition of a person who is respected and can live in freedom, peace, with good nutrition, a safe home, and without physical or psychical violation. Dignity could be the attitude of a person that is recognized by others as a proud and decent human being."

It was a great gift, dear Georg, to have you and Dorothee Densow, in our Dignity Conference in Amman, Jordan, in 2022!

Thank you for for your important messages that you delivered in our 2020 NY workshop, dear Georg!
• "Message to the World" (Text | Video recorded on November 30, 2020)
Reduce Overproduction! Hameln, Germany, November 2020

Thank you, dear Georg, for your dedicated support for our DignityNowHameln group, since 2019!
Dignity Now: Hameln Removes Plastic Waste from the Banks of its River Weser (World Dignity Movement channel | HumanDHS channel, recorded in September 2021, finalized on November 25, 2021)
• The Dignity Now Hameln Group sings Dona Nobis Pacem ("Grant Us Peace" in Latin) in the Chapel of Wangelist near Hameln (Hamelin) on November 8, 2021
2020:
Dignity Now: Hameln Presents Good Ideas from the Past and the Future for a More Sustainable Future. Thoughts Are Unchained (World Dignity Movement channel | HumanDHS channel, recorded in October and November 2020, finalized on November 21, 2020)
Die Gedanken sind Frei / Thoughts are Unchained sung by the DignityNowHameln group
This is the contribution of the DignityNowHameln group that was recorded in October and November 2020, and finalized on November 21, 2020 (World Dignity Movement channel | HumanDHS channel)

   
 

George Livingston, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

George Livingston teaches English literature courses and is interested to work in interdisciplinary areas.

A warm welcome to our workshop, dear George!

   

Gitta Ridder, Nelson, British Columbia, Canada

Gitta Ridder is a social activist, with eco feminist ideals. She kindly wrote in November 2023: "I have worked as a counsellor, consultant, teacher mostly regarding women's activism, around prevention & healing from sexual abuse & violence. Currently am running a series on Changing the Conversation around Life & Death. I am studying and working with the Pocket Project and Thomas Huebl regarding ancestral/collective trauma. The quote: activism is the rent I pay to live on this planet, resonates deeply with me especially in these times of transition. I develop and contribute when and where I can."

A warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Gitta!

   

Grace Feuerverger, Toronto, Canada

"Dignity: compassion for oneself and others, reconciliation, an open heart and mind."

Message from Evelin: How wonderful that our dear Sharon Burde brought us together in 2002, dear Grace, and that I had the privilege of paying you a visit in your home in Toronto on August 26, 2002! What a gift you have been to us in our workshops in New York City in 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012, and 2016, as well as in our online workshops during the Coronavirus pandemic! We so much appreciated also that you came to our 2009 Dignity Conference in Hawai'i!

Thank you for your important work, dear Grace!
• Feuerverger, Grace (2001). Oasis of Dreams: Teaching and Learning Peace in a Jewish-Palestinian Village in Israel. London, New York: Routledge/Falmer.
The "School For Peace": A Conflict Resolution Program in a Jewish-Palestinian Village (2005)

   

Gulistan Gursel-Bilgin, Istanbul, Turkey, Bloomington, Indiana, U.S.A.

Dr. Gulistan Gursel-Bilgin graduated from the English Language Teaching Department at the Middle East Technical University in Ankara in 2005 (BA FLE), and completed her master's degree (MA ELT) in 2009 in the same department. After serving as an English instructor in public and private institutions in Turkey for six years, Dr. Gursel-Bilgin went to the USA with a Fulbright Doctoral Fellowship.

Welcome to our workshop, dear Gulistan, for the first time! We are very happy to have you with us!

   

Hassan Keynan, Somalia, Norway, Bangladesh, U.S.A., Global

Hassan Abdi Keynan retired from UNESCO after working for more than 20 years on three continents. He served as Senior Programme Specialist in Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nigeria, Kenya, and Germany. Prior to his joining UNESCO, Mr. Keynan held the following positions: Senior consultant at the Norwegian Institute for Urban and Regional Research, Oslo, Special Adviser at Norwegian National Commission for UNESCO, Associate Professor at the Somali National University, and Secretary General of the Somali national Commission for UNESCO. In addition to being an educator, Mr. Keynan is an author and a poet. He lectured and published on a wide range of topics, including education and development in Africa, politics in the Horn of Africa, gender issues in war-torn societies, male roles and masculinity, and the African condition. Mr. Keynan studied at the University of California Los Angeles and the University of Sydney. Currently, he lives with his family in the US and devotes most of his time to writing on issues closer to his heart, including freedom, equality and human dignity, especially for the cradle of humanity and its teeming masses.

We so much value your profound wisdom, dear Hassan! What a dignifier you are in this world!

   

Hayal Köksal, Istanbul, Turkey

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Hayal explained, "Individuals must learn how to be dignified persons in time but if this is realized altogether, with the support of others, the influence will be larger and the speed of success will be higher."

At the 2020 workshop, Hayal described dignity as follows, "The quality of being worthy of honor or respect. Being satisfied with self and working to bring sistership/brotherhood to the world people for the sake of happy and healthy future generations."

Dearest Hayal, we will never forget the loving care with which you hosted our 2010 Dignity Conference in Istanbul, Turkey! And then you came to New York City for our 2014 workshop! We are deeply thankful to you!

Thank you so much, dear Hayal, for the "Message to the World" of 2021 (Video | Video recorded on November 4, 2021), and your 2020 "Message to the World" that you recorded on November 28, 2020 (Video)! And thank you for sharing your paper on peace training titled Training Peace-Focused and More Qualified New Generation: Turkey Case, 2019.


Kindly click on the images above to see them larger

   

HeidiAne Steen Jensen, Ås, Akershus, Norway

HeidiAne is a mother and grandmother, a poet, a dancer, and a peace activist. She is a member of Grandmothers for Peace (Bestemødre for fred) in Oslo, Norway.

Welcome to our workshop, dear HeidiAne, for the first time! We are very happy to have you with us!

   

Heidi Burgess, Boulder, Colorado, U.S.A.

Heidi Burgess has co-directed Beyond Intractability together with her husband Guy Burgess for the past 20 years. It was a great gift that both came to one of our first human dignity meetings, namely, the one that Morton Deutsch convened in 2004. They assemble information on what makes conflicts intractable, how to prevent it from happening, and how to transform intractable conflicts from destructive situations into constructive ones. They assemble this information from researchers and practitioners from around the world and make it available for free on www.beyondintractability.org. They are currently (2023) primarily focusing their work on hyper-polarization and the way it destroys dignity and leads to escalating conflict and violence — and how to reverse these trends.
Heidi kindly wrote in November 2023: "I am deeply concerned about how the political conflict playing out in the United States (and, no doubt, in many other places around the words), relies deeply on the humiliation of the other side. This is true for both conservatives and progressives, but since I hang out mostly with progressives and listen to/read their materials, I am most aware of the ways that these materials humiliate the right. This just drives the polarization and escalation spiral and makes the political crisis in the U.S. worse all the time. We desperately need an understanding of the importance of dignity to take root among our social justice activists, as well as among the MAGA activists on the right."

   

Hélène Opperman Lewis, Barrydale, South Africa

Dearest Hélène, thank you so much for being with us in this workshop (Video)! We will never forget the loving care with which you hosted our 2013 Dignity Conference in Stellenbosch, South Africa! And then you came to New York City for our 2014 workshop! We are deeply thankful to you!

Congratulations on your book:
Opperman Lewis, Hélène (2016, revised 2018). Apartheid: Britain's Bastard Child (Cape Town, South Africa: Reach Publishers)

 

Huda Abu Arquob, Hebron

Huda Abu Arquob has been kindly introduced to the HumanDHS network by Libby and Len Traubman on June 13, 2014: "Dear Evelin, ... Huda Abu Arquob, our peacebuilding colleague from Hebron, West Bank ... is an extraordinary Muslim champion of engagement and empathy and dignifying others from her home in Palestine. If one of you would like to welcome her into your important community, Huda gets e-mail. Libby and me, Len, 20 Years of Palestinian-Jewish Living Room Dialogue 'Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.' - Margaret Mead"

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Huda! We are very happy to have you with us!

   

Peace Philosopher Howard Richards, Chile, South Africa, and California (Justine Richards)

Dear Howard! Congratulations with the 2021 HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award!
Congratulations also with your new book Economic Theory and Community Development: Why Putting Community First Is Essential to Our Survival (Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2022) (Video)

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Howard explained, "It is a good phrase for starting conversations. Among the meanings I would like to attribute to it is sharing surplus, devoting whatever we do not need to the common good, and in particular creating dignified work that does not depend on sales to be funded. For example I fund a young woman who is an expert organic gardener to work on our quinta. She also does education, teaching gardening in a local elementary school."

In the 2020 workshop, Howard described dignity as follows, "Respect, esteem, self-esteem, security."

Peace philosopher Howard Richards is one of the deepest thinkers of our time, and more — he has also put into practice what he teaches. We thank Alicia Cabezudo for introducing him to us in 2006. Dr. Richards is a philosopher of social science who is now based in Chile, where he, his wife Caroline and their daughter Shelley host the Chileufu dialogue home. . With Gavin Andersson he teaches once a year “Ethics, Macroeconomics and Organizing” in the EMBA program at University of Cape Town. With Gavin (who pioneered the unbounded idea) and others he co-founded the Unbounded Academy. It develops dignified and dignifying solutions for our currently unsustainable institutional structures and systems. His focus is philosophical and scientific support for an ethic of care. He holds the title of Research Professor of Philosophy at Earlham College, Richmond, Indiana, USA, a Quaker school where he taught for thirty-five years. He was the founder of the Peace and Global Studies Program there and co-founder of the Business and Nonprofit Management program. [read more]

Thank you so much for your seminal work, dear Howard, throughout your entire lifetime!
• Howard Richards has been honored with the 2020 HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award (Video of the Award Ceremony in full length)
• Message of Appreciation from Evelin Lindner (Video | Pdf)
• Award Acceptance Speech by Howard Richards (Video recorded on December 8, 2021 | long Pdf | short Pdf)
• Award Acceptance Speech by Howard Richards, December 10, 2021: "Hi ! I do not receive an award like this very often. So far in my life I have received such an award only once in 83 years. At the rate I am going I would have to wait until after my 166th birthday for another opportunity to explain such an important concept to such a wonderful audience. The important concept is structural humiliation." [read more, see also a long version]
Howard Richards' 3 Most Important Messages to the World (Video, 5th June 2013 | short version prepared by Linda Hartling on December 5, 2021)

Thank you for inviting us to comment on the key points of your upcoming book that you authored with the assistance of our dear Gavin Andersson, titled Economic Theory and Community Development, that will be published soon in Dignity Press. Thank you, dear Magnus Haavelsrud, for writing a great review of the book, "Economic theory and community development." In European Journal of Cultural and Political Sociology, DOI: 10.1080/23254823.2021.1976376.

Thank you also for being with us in the 2020 workshop and allowing us to honor you on Day Three (Video Day Two | Video Day Three). You kindly wrote on December 3, 2020, when you registered for the 2020 workshop: "I have written a lot of books and I wish people knew about them and would read them, Some are described in a Wikipedia article about me. Understanding the Global Economy is a google e book. Several are on the Dignity Press site. Several are on Amazon. I can also send PDF or word copies to anybody who sends me an e mail. I might also mention that I lived through the military coup in Chile and that I was a volunteer lawyer for Cesar Chavez when he first started organizing and that I have been a lifelong student at high prestige universities, starting with Yale."

• "Embrace Communities to Save Humanity and the Planet," by Howard Richards, TRANSCEND Media Service, Editorial #673, December 28, 2020.

• On Day Two (Video), Howard Richards recommended two appendices, one titled "ending poverty" and the other "a plan for peace" from his book Understanding the Global Economy (Santa Barbara, CA: Peace Education Books, 2004, Preface). He explained that these two pieces had been published independently in The Acorn: Philosophical Studies in Pacifism and Nonviolence.

• Howard Richards has published The Nurturing of Time Future in Dignity Press in 2012, and together with Joanna Swanger, and edited by Ivo Coelho, Gandhi and the Future of Economics in 2013.
Following Foucault: The Trail of the Fox, lectures by Howard Richards with dialogues among Evelin Lindner, Howard Richards, and Catherine Odora Hoppers, Foreword by Crain Soudien (CEO of the Human Sciences Research Council of South Africa) and an Introduction by Magnus Haavelsrud, Stellenbosch, South Africa: AFRICAN SUN MeDIA, 2018. The book can be ordered from the publisher. The book is based on "Against Foucault" – A series of presentations by Howard Richards, in dialogue with Catherine Odora Hoppers and Evelin Lindner carried out in Pretoria in 2013.

   

Ian Hughes, Dublin, Ireland

Ian Hughes has a background in physics and psychoanalytic psychotherapy. He is engaged in a project at the University College Cork, 'aimed at a deep reimaging of society to place limits on dangerous leaders and create cultures which better fit our humanity'. He is a Senior Research Fellow at the Environmental Research Institute MaREI Centre, at the University College Cork, in Ringaskiddy, Co. Cork, Ireland. His writing on personality disorders has appeared on Psychology Today and Open Democracy. His blog disorderedworld.com focuses on dangerous personality disorders and their consequences. Ian lives in Dublin, Ireland. He is the author of Disordered Minds: How Dangerous Personalities Are Destroying Democracy.

Thank you, dear Maggie O'Neil, for introducing Ian to our dignity community! A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Ian! We are very happy to have you with us!

   

Ibrahim Muhammad Babangida, Niger State, Nigeria

Ibrahim Muhammad Babangida, Nigerian Bar Association NBA, is the Chairman/CEO of Online Dispute Resolution and Services in Niger State, Nigeria. He seeks dignity through conflict transformation and social justice.

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Ian! We are very happy to have you with us!

   

Isabel Barroso, Tarragona, Catalunya

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Isabel explained, "Reaching the truthful meaning of humankind." In the 2020 workshop, Isabel described dignity as follows, "The only way to attain self-respect."

Isabel Barroso is based in Tarragona, Catalunya. After earning a Degree in Linguistics and a Degree in Comparative Literature in University of Barcelona, she moved to Japan where she got a PhD in Shintoism & Religious Studies. Back in Tarragona again, she is currently working in a new PhD in Philosophy concerning the aesthetic experience of temporality in traditional Japan.

Message from Evelin Lindner: You have no idea how much we value your participation in our dignity work, dearest Isabel, and we can't wait to read your doctoral dissertation titled The Concept of Self-respect and Dignity — Comparing the East and the West! You are contributing to our dignity work in so many lovely ways, dear Isabel, not least with your wonderful musical talent! For instance, in 2021, you contributed with Pau Casals' Quest for Peace: Cant dels Ocells ("Song of the Birds") (Video | Video recorded on December 1, 2021) Pau Casals would be so proud! Thank you also very much for sharing your thoughts and the end of our 2023 workshop (Video)!

Thank you so much, dear Isabel, for offering your support for our upcoming Dignity Conference in Madrid!

   

Jennifer Schneller, Istanbul, Turkey

Jennifer Schneller is an educator especially interested in conflict resolution and peace education. She has run workshops/camps between various groups in Turkey, Greece, and Cyprus. She has worked with the Boğaziçi University Peace Education and Research Center, and is a Community Involvement Program Course Instructor.

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Jennifer! We are very happy to have you with us!

 

Jingyi Dong, Norway

Dear Jingyi, what an amazing privilege to have you with us!



Thank you so much for writing to us on December 12, 2021: "Dearest Linda and Evelin: You have made miracle! The rainbow is beautiful because it has rich and diverse colors. HumanDHS Conferences are as beautiful as rainbows, thanks to your effort that puts all the colors together. It is so touching that you work nonstop, bringing beauty to this torn and wounded world. In so doing, you bring honor to human being. No language can express my gratitude to you!!! Your continuous effort reminds me of a figure in Chinese mythology, Jingwei, a princess in the far, far remote ancient times. She was drawn in the sea. Afterwards she became a bird, continuously carrying a pebble in her mouth and dropped it into the sea. She was determined to level up the sea so that no one would be drawn again. Jingwei’s dream was in vain because she was an aristocrat. Your dream has come true because, at a time of democracy, more and more people are being inspired by you to join the cause. Millions and millions of thanks to you, modern Jjingwei! Jingyi"

Dear Jingyi, thank you also so very much for sending us your friend Cameron Jin's Inspiring Song! You kindly explained on November 29, 2021: "He sang a song last year during the time of Covid-19. He refused to give up when he was stuck in a difficult situation. He sang the song to encourage himself and his friends!" You kindly add on December 5, 2021: "Cameron Jin was a rural university student. I got to know him when I was doing review for my dissertation. His family used to be extremely poor so that they had to live on wild vegetable, but he managed to graduate from college. Whenever I hear his song, I would recall how he managed to overcome difficulties all the way and I would get inspired. I hope his song will inspire more people." Thank you for downloading his song for us, dear Jingyi, so that we can include it in our YouTube channel with an English explanation and translation! Thank you for explaining that Cameron Jin offered his song on an online platform that is without advertisement, where people sing for fun and not for monetary gain unless the audience voluntarily send some “gift” to the singer. This is the translation of the text: "At this moment, there are more choices, is it better to enjoy the rest of the time? Or to embrace the bright future to chase the morning sun? Or find a place to sit and talk to your heart? At this moment, are you still anxious about the long and misty road of human growth? Still have found the direction, enjoy the happiness of struggling at this moment..."

   

Joanie Calem, Columbus, Ohio, U.S.A.

Dear Joanie, thank you so much for offering an old Jewish legend that there are always 36 sparks of holy light traveling around in different people to keep the world running right, and we never know where that spark might be, so we have to treat each other with the respect and dignity befitting that holiness... Thank you, dear Joanie, for offering a video of the song and the story combined on your channels: www.joaniecalem.com and YouTube, and Spotify!

In 2021, you sang the song No Borders (Video | Video recorded on November 17, 2021)! Thank you also so much for the reflections you so kindly shared during the coffee break of Day Three (Video) and your thoughts at the end of the 2021 workshop (Video)!

   

John Agberagba, Jos in Plateau State, Nigeria

John Tavershima Agberagba is a Nigerian from Benue State and a Lecturer at the University of Jos in Plateau State, Nigeria, interested in conflict transformation, social justice, and the integration of creation. He has a PhD in Conflict Resolution and Gender Studies from the Irish School of Ecumenics TC in Dublin, Ireland, and an MPhil in International Peace Studies from the University in Oxford, a PGC in Forced Migration, and a BA in Theology and Anthropology. He has worked with refugees from Sierre Leone and Liberia in Guinea Conakry and with Indigenous People in Mexico.

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear John! We are very happy to have you with us!

   

Joni and Bill Baird, Doylestown, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.

Bill Baird in 2020: "Dignity recognizes the right of individuals to be free to be who they are and to not impede the rights of others to do the same."
Joni Baird: "Dignity recognizes the inherent worth and equality of every inhabitant of our earth including all living creatures and the environment."

Message from Evelin Lindner in November 2023: Dear Joni and Bill, congratulations with the wonderful documentary film directed by Rebecca Cammisa Yours in Freedom, Bill Baird! It was wonderful to watch the film together with you both!
"In an America where more and more women and trans people are losing legal bodily autonomy, the history of Bill Baird’s long fight for women’s right to abortion is as relevant as ever. Oscar-nominated filmmaker Rebecca Cammisa doesn’t just give us a portrait of Baird, but also creates a historical register of allyship and activism that those fighting to uphold freedom and choice can access, and perhaps emulate." – Bedatri D. Choudhury

Message from Evelin Lindner in November 2021: Thank you, dear Joni and Bill, for being equalists! Thank you for your life mission of working for equal dignity! In the book that I am finalizing now, I am widely quoting you, among others with this paragraph:
"As Equalists, we believe that ‘labels disable’ and create ‘us versus them’ dynamics unnecessarily fragmenting movements. Therefore, Equalists focus on the content rather than the form of the world’s many imbalanced, fear-based paradigms. Equalists believe all human beings are citizens of Planet Earth and set multiple goals for their liberation. We believe that in order to be collectively harmonious, abundant and balanced, certain universal tenets apply. Those tenets are inherently feminist with regard to our desire to radically change the current domination paradigm (occupied by all genders) to allow for equal pay, freedom from aggression, child friendly work environments, and gender diversity. Through this shift, matriarchy and patriarchy are changed to ‘humanarchy’."

   

Judit Révész, New York City, Geneva, Switzerland, Hungary

Message from Evelin: Dearest Judit, I will never forget the day when you welcomed me to Teachers College, Columbia University, on December 17, 2001, just before I gave the talk titled Humiliation and the Roots of Violence at 3.30 pm, upon the invitation of Betty Reardon, attended, among others, by Morton Deutsch!

Since 2001, you are a pillar of our dignity work, and since the inception of this website in 2003, you offer your time and energy to reply when people click on the "contact us" button! Over the years, you often worked late at night for us, even while holding two jobs and being a student. Words will never suffice to express our gratitude and admiration to you! Your deeply deeply thankful Evelin!

Thank you so much for your important contribution to this book:
"Full Circle: With Gratitude to Our Dearest Evelin Lindner." In Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations: Essays on Dignity Studies in Honor of Evelin G. Lindner. Edited by Chipamong Chowdhury, Michael Britton, and Linda Hartling. Chapter 14. (Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2019)

   

Julian Bodnar, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada 

Julian Bodnar offers Mediation, Arbitration & Conciliation Services. He describes himself on Linkedin as follows:
Over the course of a law career of 40 years, my practice was to be negotiation and settlement focused. My inspiration to seek resolution and settlement of legal disputes whenever possible is premised upon my belief and experience that the best outcomes for parties, as well ensuring better respect for the human aspects and interests of a legal dispute, are more likely to be accomplished by using case appropriate conflict and dispute resolution techniques and processes rather than strictly relying on legal proceedings.
From 2012 to 2022, I worked with the Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission as a Lawyer/Mediator where I was assigned as a mediator of human rights complaint files, and also to represent it as counsel in its Directed Mediations. I also was assigned to work on the Commission's systemic initiatives.
I now offer consulting and advocacy services in conflict and dispute resolution, including mediation, arbitration, and conciliation.
As a person with lifelong experience of living with circumstances of disability, and now also seen as being an older person, I take personal and professional interest in advocating for improved acceptance and accommodation of both disability, and aging in society, through Disability, and Aging Awareness and Equality Training and Mediation Services.

A very warm welcome to our work, dear Julian! You contacted us in 2012, when you wrote to Judit Révész expressing your interest in Don Klein's work. Thank you!

   

Kaethe Weingarten, Mountain View, California

Dr. Kaethe Weingarten is a clinical psychologist, peace psychologist and family therapist who is the Director of the Witness to Witness Program at the Migrant Clinicians Network (MCN). Until retirement, she was an Associate Clinical Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, where she had an appointment since 1981. She is the founder and director of the Witnessing Project, which helps individuals, families and communities turn the passive witnessing of violence into effective compassionate action. She currently directs the Program in Families, Trauma and Resilience at the Family Institute of Cambridge. [read more]
Kaethe kindly wrote in November 2023: "I am a community psychologist who is a trauma expert. I take a collective approach to support and solidarity for those who suffer abuse and humiliation. I was affiliated with Harvard Medical School from 1981–2016 and am now directing the Witness to Witness Program at MCN. I have many publications about the witnessing model, many in Family Process. About 3.6% of the world's population is migrants who are treated with humiliation virtually everywhere. My organization has been working on behalf of migrants for over 37 years. Migrant Clinicians Network. I am the Director of the Witness to Witness Program at MCN and have been a member of this network from the beginning. I met Evelin in 2000–2001 in Cambridge, MA."

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dear Käthe (let me write your name in accordance with artist Käthe Kollwitz, whom you admire, if I recall correctly!), we are deeply grateful for your interest in and support for our dignity work all the way back since 2001 when you read my paper on Women and Terrorism!

   

Kalen Young, Whitefish, Montana, U.S.A.

Kalen Young is an organizational change leader with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science who has earned her MA in Social Justice and Human Rights from Arizona State University. Kalen has extensive research and professional experience working on interdisciplinary research projects pertaining to sexual orientation, gender identity, public policy and hyper-masculine environments. Her research interests include radical pedagogies in praxis, humiliation as it intersects with trauma, and obstetric/traumatic fistulas through a human rights lens Her research grants her the opportunity to explore the complex matrices of socio-political impulses that perpetuate systems of institutionalized discrimination and violence. Her current research focuses on obstetric and traumatic fistulas as a nexus where trauma and humiliation intersect.

Dear Kalen, we are very happy that you contacted us in 2011! A very warm welcome to this workshop!

   

Karin Dremel, Boulder, Colorado, U.S.A., and Heidelberg, Germany

Karin Dremel wrote about dignity in 2023: The most basic experience of humiliation is "broken connection to self, others, and the world at large" by an other person, and sometimes by (at some point in time internalized) rants of self-humiliation.
While not a direct quote, R.J. Lifton's definition of the essence of trauma highlights what I call "Trauma-Humiliation-Trauma-Humiliation" cycles. As a systemic traumatologist and Systems Constellation facilitator of Inner World/family/community/institutional systems (and their intersection), dignity of and for all parts is one of my specific interests and an areas of focus.

Karin Dremel is a German native and citizen who lives in Colorado, U.S.A., and maintains a private Heilpraktiker Praxis in Weinheim, Germany since 1993. She is a Registered Psychotherapist # 6709 (Colorado), an Integrative Healing Practitioner (HP, Germany), a Family and Systems Constellation Teacher & Facilitator Humanist Chaplain in the U.S.A. Three decades of training, facilitation, and teaching in Systems and Family Constellation work along with being nationally licensed as a Heilpraktikerin in Germany, registration as a mental health professional in Colorado, and interdisciplinary degrees in Social Sciences (BA) and Theological Studies (MTS) amount to her focus on and creation of "Interdisciplinary Systemic Traumatology (IST)" ST has become signpost and essence of her approach to an individual's or a system's query for change.

Karin kindly shared this story from her clinic: One of my clients with a propensity of self-critique, even down-right self-humiliation, answered my query about her suffering in an abusive relationship with "Maybe its Me!" She then shared that she had a book with this title on her nightstand, albeit not able to follow its sure-fire advice to just "cut the crap of her suffering!" This, in turn, visibly feed her critical self-humiliation. In light of her traumatic upbringing, during which she routinely was made othered and made THE problem, I answered, firmly and simply, "Maybe its NOT you!" Later she shared with me that this was one of the most powerful moments of our collaborative work. That day she had taken the book to a thrift store in hopes that someone else might find it less, well, humiliating.

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dear Karin, we are so thankful for your valuable contributions to our dignity work! We are very glad that you came to our work through WISR in 2018! Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts at the end of our 2023 workshop (Video), and for your lovely poem titled First Imagined Day that you shared with us in 2020 (Video | Lyrics December 30, 2020)!

   

Karen Hirsch, New York City

Karen Hirsch works for dignity through deep listening, dialogue and kindness. She kindly wrote in 2023: "When people experience openhearted, kind listening, it almost always contributes to their feeling more relaxed, valued, and open." Karen co-creates and co-facilitates Zoom groups regarding antisemitism. She also volunteers with Riverside Language and Catholic Charities English Conversation programs.

Dear Karen, you are a pillar of our dignity work all the way back since 2009, when Rebecca Fadil brought you to our workshop in New York, and we are deeply thankful for your support ever since!

Karen kindly wrote on December 1, 2015:
"The Brief Bio of a Practical Dreamer — That's Me!"
We are globally all in this together — literally — because we share the same Mother Earth and can't escape our environment. This reality, combined with the North Star of seeking to be aware of and hopefully connect to the basic humanity in everyone, is the context for my work and life.
I offer coaching (single conversations and more structured arrangements), editing, writing, facilitating, training, and connecting people with each other — primarily in the nonprofit world. It's a source of joy and honor to contribute to the "greater good" by being a "weaver of people" (Maori definition of a leader) across all apparent differences and divides.
My training and experience include leadership development and coaching, conflict resolution, facilitation, emotional intelligence (EQ), basic communication skills (with emphasis on deep listening to others and self), and whole systems transformation.
Starting in the late 1960s, I was a political activist, volunteer or paid staffer in organizations committed to reducing nuclear weapons, preventing wars, bringing Israeli Jews and Palestinians together and strengthening democracy. Several decades later, I incorporated the basic values and vision into a non-adversarial perspective of "both-and", rather than "either-or".
A lover of learning and integrating, I have been inspired by extraordinary teachers across many interrelated disciplines who truly "walk their talk". And I have experienced and continue to integrate within myself what I believe are the universal values embedded in Humanism, Judaism (I am Jewish), Sufiism, Buddhism and Christianity.
Since 1978, I have been a New Yorker by choice — drawn to the incredible mix of people, layers of history and still vibrant creative energy.

   

Kathy Beckwith, Dayton, Oregon, U.S.A.

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Kathy explained, "Dignity through solidarity expresses to me an optimism and hopefulness about living in respect and appreciation of and with others, by experiencing the "wind beneath our wings" that comes through working and playing with and knowing others who share the same longing and vision."

In 2020, she explained dignity as follows: "The acknowledgement and kind celebration of our preciousness — each to the other."

Congratulations with your TEDx Talk titled "It's time to abandon war; there are alternatives" TEDxMcMinnville, January 2019!
Congratulations also with your 2015 book, dear Kathy! You contacted us in 2014, and a year later, we had your book come out! What a gift to the world!
Beckwith, Kathy (2015). A Mighty Case Against War: What America Missed in U.S. History Class and What We (All) Can Do Now (Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press)

Thank you so much for sharing so much of your creative dignity work both in 2021 and 2020, dear Kathy:

2021:
You are Amazing, recorded on November 7, 2021

2020:
• "Message to the World — Dignity through Kindness, Respect, and Peace" recorded on November 26, 2020. Kathy kindly wrote on November 27, 2020: "If it would inspire just a few people to think of the potential for peer mediation and abandoning war, and "being nice first" it would be so worth our time..."
Child of the Earth (Video on Day Three | Audio, recorded on November 5, 2020)

   

Kathy Goodman, New York City

Katherine Komaroff Goodman is a founding Principal at ACCORD, a collaborative of conflict management and resolution specialists serving individuals and businesses. Kathy received her M.S. in Negotiation and Conflict Resolution from Columbia University in 2013. Her undergraduate degree is from the University of California, Berkeley, in both art history and psychology. Ms. Goodman is a mediator and received her training from the New York Peace Institute. Ms. Goodman is certified to administer the Emotional Intelligence assessment (EQ-i 2.0) and the Neethling Brain Instrument (NBI) to individuals and groups, to interpret the results and then to coach on the basis of the data. These assessments are useful tools in many contexts, including workplace, marital and family disputes. Her Master’s thesis took a comprehensive look at “Engaging emotions in self and parties in the mediation context.” It is a given that emotions are central to both the formation and the resolution of conflicts and her work embraces the value of emotions as a window to underlying needs and issues of the conflict situation. 

Message from Evelin Lindner: Thank you, dear Kathy, for your invaluable support for our dignity work, including the most generous hospitality that you extended to me! Thank you also reading (on December 5, 2023) the summary of my father's path and how it influenced my life. You suggested that this story should be turned into a film, with my father's path told in black and white, and, at the end, my story, briefly, in color. The main lesson, the world can learn from my father, you concluded, is the following: "Never again" is not enough! "Resist the beginnings" is what is needed!" "Never again" is about remembering, "resist the beginnings" is about preventing "once again"! I am in deep gratitude to you, dear Kathy!

   

Katrin Brubakk, Trondheim, Norway

Katrin Glatz Brubakk is a child psychologist and university lecturer at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim, Norway, and a field worker for, among others, Doctors Without Borders. Brubakk has for a number of years worked for and with refugees in the Congo, Egypt, and Greece, and on rescue ships in the Mediterranean and in Lebanon.

A very warm welcome to our workshop, dear Katrin! Thank you so much for your most courageous dignity work in this world! Few people are as brave as you are! It was a great privilege to meet you in November 2022!

   

Kingsley Okoro, Nigeria

Dr. Kingsley Okoro kindly participated in our 2012 dignity workshop. He hails from Uburu in Ebonyi State of Nigeria. He started his vocational career as an Anglican priest in 1994. He attended the prestigious Trinity Union Theological College Umuahia, where he obtained a Diploma in Theology and thereafter moved to the University of Calabar and obtained a BA (Hons) in Religious Studies, a MA in Religious Studies with special emphasis in Religion and Politics and a PhD in Religion and Society with special interest in Globalistics or Global trends. Dr Kingsley joined the Lecturing crew of Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki-Nigeria in 2006, and has made tremendous progress and impact in his career. He is a member of several International and National research associations, which include IPRA (International Peace Research Association). The aim of the association is to broker peace through painstaking research and education, the Peace Movement Trust, with headquarters in India, the Institute for Research and Development, in Nigeria, and the International Association for the Study of Religions. Currently he is nominated to join in the IPRA Special Interest Group (SIG) in Peace Research in Africa.

Thank you, dear Michelle Brenner, for having introduced Kingsley to our dignity community in 2011!

   

Kirsten Margrethe Kvam, Brøttum, Hedmark, Norway

Kirsten Margrethe Kvam works as Department Consultant and EU-Advisor at the Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA), Norway’s leading institution for applied ecological research, with broad-based expertise on the genetic, population, species, ecosystem and landscape level, in terrestrial, freshwater, and coastal marine environments. The Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, NINA, is as an independent foundation focusing on environmental research, emphasizing the interaction between human society, natural resources and biodiversity, established in 1988. The headquarters are located in Trondheim, with branches in Tromsø, Lillehammer, Bergen and Oslo.
Margrethe has also been the Vice-President of The Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), an international non-governmental organisation (NGO) with National Sections covering every continent, an International Secretariat based in Geneva, and a New York office focused on the work of the United Nations (UN). WILPF is the oldest international women's peace organisation in the world. On 28 April 1915, during World War I, a group of 1,136 women from warring and neutral nations gathered in The Hague, the Netherlands, to discuss how to end the war and ensure permanent peace.

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dearest K. Margrethe, thank you so much for the invaluable dignity work that you are doing in this world! It was such a privilege to meet you in Melbu in 2010! I will also never forget your contribution to my 60th birthday gathering! A very warm welcome to our workshop, dear K. Margrethe! It is a great honor to have you with us!

   

Kristian Laubjerg, København, Denmark

Kristian Laubjerg was born in a remote rural region of Denmark in 1948. He was the head of the Middle East and North Africa desk in the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) until 2001. This post provided him with an opportunity to gain close insight into how the United Nations and its agencies work. He completed his time with UNICEF by serving as head of three countries in Central Africa. After his early retirement, he founded a health care agency in Senegal. [read more]

Kindly see his article 'The Mask of Democracy: Democracy provides cover for continued exploitation by a handful of oligarchs', in Wall Street International Magazine, 20th December 2020.

A very warm welcome to our workshop, dear Kristian! It is a great honor to have you with us!

   
 

Leigh Gage, U.S.A.

Leigh Gage is the father of late Melissa Gage, who was a bilingual high school student in New York City, dedicated to peace, in 2006, when she attended Evelin Lindner's seminar at Teachers College, Columbia University, introduced by Milton Schwebel, Melissa Sweeney, and Tony Jenkins. Kindly see Different Types of Humiliation Elicit Different Emotional, Cognitive And Behavioral Reactions, the note Melissa prepared for the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict. Sadly, Melissa passed away in 2017.

Melissa's father is retired and is interested in self compassion. He kindly wrote in November 2023: "My daughter Melissa Gage was researching humiliation in 2006 and I’m interested in knowing more."

A very warm welcome to our workshop, dear Leigh! It is a great honor to have you with us, in the name of your beloved late daughter!

 

Leland "Lee" R. Beaumont, Middletown, New Jersey, U.S.A.

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Lee explained, "When we can recognize that respecting the human dignity we are each born with provides the basis for moral reasoning and daily decision making, we can unite on this common ground."

Thank you so very much, dear Lee, for your life work! We are happy that you found our work in 2007, and that you came to our workshops in 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2021, 2022, and now 2023! Thank you so much for sharing your valuable work over all these years!

Dear Lee, how can we ever thank you enough! As a consultant in computer networking, you have single-handedly built a monumental contribution to our World Dignity University initiative!

Wisdompage: “I wonder how that works?” is the question that has propelled much of the life and career of Leland R. Beaumont. Expressed early on as an interest in science, math, engineering, and computer science, he obtained Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Electrical Engineering as he began his career at Bell Laboratories and Lucent Technologies.

• In your registration for 2021, you kindly shared an amazingly comprehensive graphical overview over the Causal Relationships Shaping Our Universe! Thank you also for sharing your ideas for future Dignilogue (Dignity + Dialogue) topics:
1) Seeking real good
2) Creating a Human Rights Olympics event
3) Moral reasoning

• Thank you for creating in the past years more than 60 pages of wise affirmations, a thought experiment that can help better understand the role luck plays in one's life, a course on problem finding, and on confronting tyranny. Thank you for offering an optimistic vision of the future, and a Wikiversity Possibilities curriculum.

• You kindly wrote in 2019:
As a gift to you and the people of the world I have developed the Wisdom and the Future Research Center, where researchers are exploring the question How can we wisely create our future?
I have also developed a freely available course on Moral Reasoning."

   

Linda Hartling, Portland, Oregon, principle convener of this workshop, please see her bio below and here!

Dignity? "A world without humiliation dignifies us all!"

Dearest Linda, no message of gratitude will ever be enough to express how we — the entire global dignity community — feel about your immeasurable work of love and dignity!

YOU have nurtured also this workshop into being! YOU are doing the "invisible work" that makes our workshops possible! Our conferences do not "fall from the sky," they require years and months of committed nurturing, they grow out of years of dignifying preparations that are both loving and meticulous. We do not know anyone else who can combine loving care and thoroughly reliable meticulousness as genially as you do! In Norwegian, there is the term "ild sjel" or "fire soul" — this is what you are, a true fire soul! We cannot express our gratitude to you often enough!

See our gratitude in 2023 and 2022, and see also two rounds of appreciations for your efforts at our 2021 workshop (Video | Video). See also a message of gratitude from Evelin Lindner, recorded prior to the 2020 workshop on November 25 and December 9, 2020 (Video). And then see our messages of gratitude at the end of the 2020 workshop (Video), where all participants expressed their deep gratitude and admiration for your leadership, as, after all, YOU make all our workshops possible!

Thank you so much, dear Linda, for co-editing this important and most touching book, and for writing the Foreword and the final chapter:
"Moving Beyond Humiliation: A Relational Conceptualization of Human Rights." In Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations: Essays on Dignity Studies in Honor of Evelin G. Lindner. Edited by Chipamong Chowdhury, Michael Britton, and Linda Hartling. Chapter 15. (Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2019)

   

Lior Locher, United Kingdom

Lior Locher is nonbinary (they, them, their) and has a background in psychology, communication, conflict resolution, systems thinking, psychotherapy, yoga, and art. They are an artist and creative arts activist, a coach and facilitator of conflict resolution. They have a portfolio career with work in learning and development as a day job, and their own coaching business and artistic practice. They have lived in 6 countries on 4 continents.
They explain, "I understand and support change and changemakers. Using the energy of entrepreneurship and the deep care to make things better for everyone, that’s what it’s about. Not the quick fixes. Stuff that goes deep enough and then gets practical. Humor. Depth, lightly held." [read more]

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dearest Lior, we are very glad that Robert Fuller made you aware of our work in 2005! You kindly wrote in 2005: Sehr geehrte Frau Dr. Lindner, Über das Buch „Somebodies and nobodies“ und die darin verzeichneten Webadressen bin ich auf die Seite humiliationstudies.org gekommen. Ich finde das ein sehr interessantes, interdisziplinäres Projekt. Ich habe über die Informationen auf der Seite hinaus einige Fragen, von denen ich hoffe, dass Sie die Zeit finden, sie zu beantworten."

A very warm welcome to our 2023 workshop, dear Lior! We were very glad to have you with us in our 2005 Dignity Conference in Berlin and happy that you registered for our 2006 conference in Costa Rica, our 2009 conference in Hawaii, as well as our 2011 and 2012 December workshops, even though you unfortunately were finally hindered to join us in the latter conferences. We were very glad to welcome you back when you registered for our 2020 online December workshop, and we were so happy to have you with us online again for our 2023 hybrid December workshop!

   

Lucien Xavier Lombardo, Virginia, U.S.A.

Dignity (2020): "An essence of our lives that connects with its meaning and others. It exists in experience and does not need to be judged, measured or defined. Unlike justice, equality, fairness, equality, dignity does not yield to power; it is not subject to measurement; it is not based on a judgment; it is not political! Dignity is!"

Thank you, dear Lou, for kindly writing in the registration for the 2021 workshop: "Working to integrate 'dignity' into world of children. Started working career as a teacher in a maximum security prison and from there, taught for 40 years act Old Dominion University, Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice. Latest research involved implementation of UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Southern Cayuga Anne Frank Tree Project, National No Hit Zone Committee, Harriet Tubman Center for Justice and Peace, National Partnership to End Interpersonal Violence It shapes HOW teachers and learners interact with the problems and material they are studying. Doing so as co-investigators — implementing Paulo Freire's Pedagogy of Hope! Exploring how "a dignity perspective" can shape curriculum across disciplines at the college/ university level. Discussing how dignity can be integrated into the mission statements of public and private school systems! What would it mean? How would it look?

Dearest Lou, we are privileged that you found our work in 2013! Thank you so much for sharing your work since then at each of our workshops!
• "Message to the World — Learning about Dignity" (Text | Video recorded on December 5, 2020)
Thank you also for:
Human Dignity and Childhood, Workshop with Leadership Team, Auburn Enlarged City School District, Auburn, NY, November 18, 2019
Finding My Way to Questions about Violence, prepared for Senior Scholar Lecture, College of Arts and Letters, November 4, 2006... Dr. Lombardo's Journey: It's Never Been Just Academic — Was It Following Me Around?
• Lucien Lombardo Shared His Experiences (Video, December 8, 2023)

   

Maggie O'Neill, Ireland and England

What a gift, dear Maggie, that esteemed Ruth Lister brought you to us in 2005, and that you came all across the Atlantic to our workshops in New York City in 2005, 2006, 2007, 2012, and 2013! You kindly registered for our 2015 workshop in New York City, but could unfortunately not travel from the UK after all. Then you kindly registered for our 2017 conference in Indore, India, and our 2017 workshop in New York City, but again could unfortunately not travel. In 2020 and 2021 we were thrilled to have you with us in our December workshops that we held online due to the Coronavirus pandemic! Thank you so much, dear Maggie, for your contribution to Dignilogue 1 of our 2020 online workshop: Dignity Studies: Reimagining Learning in of World of Crises (Video)! You then kindly registered for our 2022 conference in Amman, Jordan, and we were sad that you could not travel at the end. We were delighted to have you with us again in our 2022 online December workshop and how WONDERFUL to have you with us online in our hybrid workshop in 2023!

Dear Maggie, you have no idea, how much we value your work and your ongoing support for our dignity work! We have no words to express our gratitude, appreciation, and admiration for you!

Thank you for sharing your work with us, dear Maggie:
Participation Arts and Social Action in Research (PASAR): Theatre Making and Walking in Research with Migrant Women, with Umut Erel, Ereni Kaptani, Tracey Reynolds and Maggie O’Neill, a short film by Marcia Chandra that shares the work and importantly the process, (Video | Pdf comment | PASAR)

Walking Conversations with Maggie O’Neill, Arpad Szakaloczai, Ger Mullally, the Dingle Creativity and Innovation Hub and students and teachers from the Pobalscoil Chorca Dhuibhne. Walking is a mundane activity but also fundamental to our way of being and sociality, taking a walk with someone is a powerful way of communicating about experience, we can become attuned and connected in a lived embodied way with the feelings and lived experience of another. Pioneering Anthropologist Tim Ingold talks about walking as the ‘art of paying attention’. Walking opens a space for dialogue, and embodied knowledge and experience can be shared, it is ‘convivial’ in the senses described above. This short film by Jan Haaken and Maciej Klich shares this work in progress and in process on walking conversations and the walking classroom. (Video | Pdf comment)

   

María Cristina Azcona, Buenos Aires, Argentina

"Dignity is the right to deserve respect from others and regarding social groups, it means respect to human rights. In the sense of children, it means respect to their bodies and not only their souls."

Dear María, so good that our Ada Aharoni brought you to us in 2005! All your life you have generously woven global dignity networks! Thank you!

Thank you for sharing the Mission of the Worldwide Peace Organization (English and Spanish) for this workshop, dear María!
Education for a New Millennium, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 2018
The Education of Morality for Parents and Children, Buenos Aires, Argentina, October 10, 2020

Thank you for sharing earlier:
Dignity and Humiliation in Argentina, a paper written by María for HumanDHS in 2005

   

Maryam Talakoob, San Francisco, California

Maryam Talakoob is a 63 year old Iranian American who lives in San Francisco, California. Her day job is data analysis and statistics. She also holds a M.A. degree in Gerontology from San Francisco State University (December 2022) and volunteers as gerontologist and listener to people’s conflicts by validation. She is a mother and a wife and a multi-lingual speaker of English, Persian, and Spanish, and has prior cultural experience of living abroad and serving as a Peace Corps volunteer in economic development. She has been studying Spanish for 7 years and continues to learn the cultures of Latin America.

Maryam kindly wrote in November 2023: Dignity is "learning through dialogue," and it is "creative arts."

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Maryam! We are very happy to have you with us!

   

Michael Boyer, Hameln (Hamelin), Germany

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Michael responded, "Solidarity with your fellows should prerequisite dignified relations."

Dignity (2020): "Dignism!"

Thank you, dear Michael, for your amazing Dignity Anthem that you created in November 2022!
the anthem as part of the Introduction to the 2022 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
the anthem alone with big subtitles
the anthem alone with with small subtitles
the anthem alone without subtitles
the text of the anthem

Thank you, dear Michael, for your loving support for dignity and your amazing work with our DignityNowHameln group! Thank you for your Digniworld initiative that you created in 2019 (Video): Digniworld WordPress | Digniworld Facebook | Digniworld Twitter | Digniworld Instagram | World Dignity Movement (on YouTube)

All these lovely contributions to our 2021 workshop from Hameln came true due to your untiring support:
Dignity Now: Hameln Removes Plastic Waste from the Banks of its River Weser (World Dignity Movement channel | HumanDHS channel, recorded in September 2021, finalized on November 25, 2021)
• The Dignity Now Hameln Group sings Dona Nobis Pacem ("Grant Us Peace" in Latin) in the Chapel of Wangelist near Hameln (Hamelin) on November 8, 2021
Dear Michael, thank you for devising a lovely "script" for the introduction of the Hameln group during Dignilogue 5 of our workshop: Evelin describes the Group > Evelin to Michael > Michael to Regina > Regina to Andrea > Film - BUND Plastic Action > Andrea to Georg > Georg to Claudia > Claudia to Gisela > Gisela to Dorothee > Dorothee to Andreas > back to Evelin greeting Zuzana Lučkay Mihalčinová > Dona Nobis Pacem.

Thank you also for your wonderful contributions to our 2020 workshop:
Dignity Now: Hameln Presents Good Ideas from the Past and the Future for a More Sustainable Future. Thoughts Are Unchained (World Dignity Movement channel | HumanDHS channel, recorded in October and November 2020, finalized on November 21, 2020)
This is the contribution of the DignityNowHameln group that was recorded in October and November 2020, and finalized on November 21, 2020 (World Dignity Movement channel | HumanDHS channel)
See more in detail:
• 01 Marienhof (World Dignity Movement channel | HumanDHS channel)
• 02 Unverpackt Laden (World Dignity Movement channel | HumanDHS channel)
• 03 Song Die Gedanken sind Frei / Thoughts are Unchained (World Dignity Movement channel | HumanDHS channel)
• Dear Michael, thank you also for your wonderful vocal interlude! (Video at the end)
• Hameln Sings (all vocal interludes brought together) (Video)

   

Michael Britton, Highland Park, New Jersey, U.S.A.

Dearest Michael! What a gift it is to have you as a core pillar of our dignity work since 2006! Thank you so much for kindly accepting that we honored you with our 2017 Lifetime Commitment Award!

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dear Michael, I will never forget how we met on November 14, 2006, when you kindly attended my presentation titled Humiliation and the Roots of Violence: Human Conflict in a Globalizing World, to which our dear Philip Brown had invited me at the New Jersey Center for Character Education, Center for Applied Psychology, Rutgers University, New Jersey. I still have some pictures.

In the annual Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict that takes place each year at Columbia University, you hold the Don Klein Celebration Lecture in place of the lecture that Don Klein held each year until he passed away in 2007, titled The Humiliation Dynamic: Looking Back... Looking Forward

This were your wonderful lectures, dear Michael:
• December 8, 2023: Carriers of Hope (Video edited by Linda Hartling | Video pre-recorded on December 6, 2023 | Thank-you Video)
• December 9, 2022: Rediscovering the Wonders of Learning Through Dignity (Video | Video pre-recorded on November 21, 2022)
• December 9, 2021:Gathering of Voices: The Don Klein Invitation to Reflect Together (Video | Video pre-recorded on December 5, 2021, and edited by Linda Hartling on December 6, 2021 | a longer presentation with PowerPoint pre-recorded on November 30, 2021, and edited by Linda Hartling on December 1, 2021)
• December 10, 2020: From a Virus Pandemic to a Pandemic of Dignity (Video | Video pre-recorded on October 18, 2020 | Video recorded on October 18, 2020, and edited by Linda Hartling on December 3, 2020)
• December 6, 2019: Can We Teach Dignity? Becoming Lifelong Apprentices of Dignity from Childhood Throughout All Ages (Full Video | Short Video by Chipamong Chowdhury)
• December 7, 2018: What Is the Language of Dignity? (Video)
• December 8, 2017: The Nature of Dignity – The Dignity of Nature (Video)
• December 9, 2016: The Globalization of Dignity (Video)
• December 4, 2015: The Globalization of Dignity (Video)
• December 5, 2014: Visions that Endanger, Visions that Nurture (Video)
• December 6, 2013: Visions that Endanger, Visions that Nurture
• December 7, 2012: Visions that Endanger, Visions that Nurture
• December 9, 2011: Visions that Endanger, Visions that Nurture
• December 10, 2010: Visions that Endanger, Visions that Nurture
• December 11, 2009: Visions that Endanger, Visions that Nurture
• December 12, 2008: The Humiliation Dynamic: Looking Back... Looking Forward
• December 14, 2007: The Humiliation Dynamic: Looking Back... Looking Forward

Thank you so much, dear Michael, for co-editing this important and most touching book, and for writing the Introduction:
Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations: Essays on Dignity Studies in Honor of Evelin G. Lindner. Edited by Chipamong Chowdhury, Michael F. Britton, and Linda M. Hartling. Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2019.

   

Michael Greene, Montclair, New Jersey, U.S.A.

Michael Greene, Ph.D., is a Senior Project Director at Rutgers University Center for Applied Psychology, a consultant for The Nicholson Foundation, and sole proprietor of Greene Consulting. Dr. Greene received his academic training in developmental psychology at Columbia University. He previously established two centers for the study and prevention of violence: the Center for the Prevention of Violence at Youth Consultation Service and the Violence Institute of New Jersey at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey.

Dear Michael, we are very glad that Phil Brown brought you to us in 2007, and that you contributed most wonderfully to D. Raja Ganesan's Special Issue with the article "School Violence and Human Rights, Dignity and Humiliation"! Thank you!

   
 

Miriam Pegesa and Moritz Engbers, Hannover, Germany

Miriam Pegesa is a high school teacher whose thesis was titled Eine qualitative Studie zu didaktischen Konzepten von Geschichtslehrpersonen zum Holocaust (A Qualitative Study on Didactic Concepts of History Teachers About the Holocaust).

Moritz holds a PhD in sustainability research and is a coordinator for transdiciplinary projects, a facilitator, and a Gestalt therapist (in-training).

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dear Miriam and Moritz, you have no idea how happy we were that you joined us in our workshop! Your contributions are always most enriching! Thank you!

   

Michael Perlin, New York City, New Jersey, U.S.A.

Dear Michael! What a pillar of our dignity work you have been since our dear George Woods brought you to us in 2006! Thank you so much for kindly accepting that we could honor you with our 2012 Lifetime Commitment Award!

Michael L. Perlin is Professor of Law Emeritus at New York Law School (NYLS), where he was director of NYLS’s Online Mental Disability Law Program, and director of NYLS’s International Mental Disability Law Reform Project in its Justice Action Center. He is co-founder of Mental Disability Law and Policy Associates, and has written 34 books and over 300 articles on all aspects of mental disability law, focusing primarily on issues related to criminal law and procedure. He has litigated at every court level from police court to the US Supreme Court, and has done advocacy work on every continent. He is the honorary life president of the International Society for Therapeutic Jurisprudence and a member of that society’s current Board of Trustees. He is also a member of the Lawrence Township (NJ) Community Concert Band, the Temple University Night Owls band, and the board of directors of the Washington Crossing (NJ) Audubon Society.

Dear Michael, you wrote about dignity: "I have been writing about this for years. See my articles, among others, my chapter "Dignity and Therapeutic Jurisprudence: How We Can Best End Shame and Humiliation," in Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations 113 (Chipamong Chowdhury and Michael Britton eds. 2019) (Dignity Press); See more here."

Thank you so much for sharing:
• "In These Times of Compassion When Conformity's in Fashion": How Therapeutic Jurisprudence Can Root out Bias, Limit Polarization and Support Vulnerable Persons in the Legal Process (Video 2021)
• “Therapeutic Jurisprudence: Foundations, Expansion, and Assessment,” University of Miami Law Review (2021)
• "Message to the World" (Text | Video | Video recorded on December 7, 2020)

Thank you in particular for your important contribution to this book:
• "Dignity and Therapeutic Jurisprudence: How We Can Best End Shame and Humiliation." In Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations: Essays on Dignity Studies in Honor of Evelin G. Lindner. Edited by Chipamong Chowdhury, Michael F. Britton, and Linda M. Hartling. Chapter 6. (Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2019)

   

Mitra Visvesh, Oslo, Norway

Mitra Visvesh is an artist and social psychologist, member of the Global-MINDS programme in social and cultural psychology at the University of Oslo. Among others, she attended the seminar PSY4506 - Human Rights, Democracy and Reconstruction after Conflict; A community based approach, on March 9, 2023.

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Mitra! We are very happy to have you with us!

   

Natália S. Viana Brasil, João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil

"Dignity means being respected and able to live with all natural rights."

Natália S. Viana Brasil has studied law at the Universidade Estadual da Paraíba (Rede UEPB) and lives in João Pessoa, Brazil.

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dearest Nati, you have no idea how wonderful it was to meet you in São Paulo in 2012 through our dear Gaby Saab! You are sorely missed! A very warm welcome to our workshop!

   

Noorit Larsen, Oppland, Norway

Noorit Larsen is a Communications Advisor at the Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences in Oppland County, Norway. Noorit has graduated with an LLB degree from the University of Haifa, Israel. During her bachelor degree she developed a growing interest in human rights and related disciplines, as well as took part in the ‘human rights in society’ legal clinic. After finishing her bachelor degree she moved to Norway to live with her husband who is Norwegian. She has graduated with a master's degree in Medical Law and Ethics from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. Among her areas of interest and research expertise are: human rights, medical law, international healthcare law, distribution of natural resources, public international law, international criminal justice, jurisprudence and law and development. She hopes to do her Ph.D. in Norway in the latter subject; she believes the reciprocal relations between international law and international development are not only interesting and fruitful but from her perspective — inevitable as well. She also believes there is research in a relatively small scale in the area of law and development.

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dearest Noorit, a very warm welcome to our workshop! We are so glad that our esteemed Michael Perlin brought you to us! WELCOME!

 

Nora Alfano, Punta Gorda, Florida, U.S.A.

Nora Alfano is a retired teacher, dedicated to fostering the dignity of the disabled through education of the students and the community. She has promoted social inclusion through sports as a Special Olympics volunteer. Nora has a B.S. in Education, Special Education from Fitchburg State University.

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dearest Nora, how happy we are that your sister Becky brought you to us! We are deeply thankful for the wonderful support that you and your sister are offering to our dignity work!

   
 

Özgür Basyigit, Bolu, Turkey

Özgür Basyigit is a Faculty member of the Faculty of Law at the Abant İzzet Baysal University in Bolu, Turkey, and a lawyer at the Istanbul Bar Association. He kindly shared in November 2023: "I was born in 1977 in Konya, Turkey and received my undergraduate education at Kocaeli University Faculty of Law. I did my master's degree on labor law at the same university and completed my doctoral education at Istanbul Kültür University, Faculty of Law. I served as a Gendarmerie in the Turkish Armed Forces and worked as a faculty member at Kocaeli University and Gaziantep University. I am currently a faculty member at Bolu Abant İzzet Baysal University Faculty of Law and also a lawyer at the Istanbul Bar Association. I am working on labor law regulations within the scope of equality between men and women. I am also interested in the legal problems that refugees face and their employment structures within the scope of these problems.
I supported Syrian Refugees regarding their legal rights and assisted in employment-related processes for housewives who are among disadvantaged groups."

Dear Özgür Basyigit, thank you so much for connecting with us on August 17, 2014! A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time!

   

Paola Cruz, Honduras

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Paola explained, "Communal efforts for attaining equality for all."

Paola Cruz was introduced to HumanDHS by Chipamong Chowdhury. Born in Honduras, she is active in the Yoga and Wellness community since 2018, after graduating in India from her YTT. She has since kept up with her practice and continuing education, including courses from Yale, Princeton, and Embodied Philosophy. Her special areas of interest, study, and research are healing trauma and emotions management through Chakra practice, mindfulness for modern living, and guiding meditations.

Dear Paola, thank you so much for joining us for our workshop upon the invitation of our dear Bhante Revata Dhamma!

   

Peter Coleman, New York City

Peter Coleman, Director of the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR), Columbia University, Teachers College (TC), is the recipient of the 2020 HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award. It is a great honor to have him contribute with his crucially important work to this workshop!

Thank you, dear Peter, for your brilliant contribution to our 2022 workshop, with The Way Out Challenge (Video)!

Peter T. Coleman is Professor of Psychology and Education at Columbia University, where he holds a joint-appointment at Teachers College and The Earth Institute. Dr. Coleman directs the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR), is founding director of the Institute for Psychological Science and Practice (IPSP), and is executive director of Columbia University’s Advanced Consortium on Cooperation, Conflict, and Complexity (AC4). His book titled, The Way Out: How to Overcome Toxic Polarization was released in 2021.

Morton Deutsch and Peter Coleman have been pillars of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network since its inception, and on December 11, 2009, Morton Deutsch was the first recipient of the HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award. Peter Coleman is a co-sponsor of this event and our anchor at Columbia University. Without his support, there would be no workshop. He is a distinguished contributor since the inception of our dignity community since 2001, together with Morton Deutsch. It is a great joy and immense honor for us that he is willing to give us his time this December. Peter and his team are a shining example of putting ideas into practice, practice that transcends international and institutional boundaries. Our relationship with Columbia University is one model for our WDUi of working in concert with a degree-granting institution, rather than in competition.

Peter Coleman has been honored with the 2020 HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award at the 17th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict at Columbia University in New York City, December 10 – 12, 2020. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, this conference had to take place online.
Award Ceremony (Video)
Message of Appreciation from Evelin Lindner (Pdf)
Peter Coleman's Remarks in Appreciation of the 2020 HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award, recorded on December 11, 2020 (Video)
• See also Peter Coleman’s Life Story in "Fundamentals of Conflict Resolution, Instructor Peter Coleman Highlights #ScholarStrike," MD-ICCCR at Teachers College, Columbia University, September 11, 2020 (Video)

   

Philip Brown, Colorado Springs, Colorado, and New Jersey, U.S.A.

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Phil explained in 2021, "We need each other to build and maintain social cohesion rooted in a just, fair, and caring vision of civilization. Solidarity must be defined in a way that is distinguished from a tribalistic approach to survival."

At the 2020 workshop, Phil defined dignity as follows, "Opportunities for genuine connection with other's humanity under the umbrella of egalitarian principles and respect for all sentient beings."

Dr. Philip Brown is the recipient of the 2016 HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award. He is a Coach for the National School Climate Center, and is President of the newly reorganized International Center for Assault Prevention.

Thank you so much, dear Phil, for being a pillar of our dignity work all the way back since 2004, when our beloved Don Klein brought you to us! Thank you for wonderfully hosting, together with Stephanie Knox Steiner, the Dignilogue titled Reimagining Education (Video) in our 2023 workshop! Equal gratitude goes to you for hosting Dignilogue 3 in the 2021 workshop, and for contributing to Dignilogue 5 with an important message: Dignifying the Individual Has Both an Interpersonal and Institutional Context and Dimension: Solidarity can happen for good or evil purposes; without prosocial core anchors, it can lead in the wrong direction (Video | PowerPoint)

Phil Brown is a developmental psychologist who has worked to support K-12 education for more than 45 years. He has been part of the HumanDHS network since his doctoral committee chair, Don Klein, invited him in 2004. He is a devotee of intentional networking. He currently serves as President of the International Center for Assault Prevention and as a senior consultant for the National School Climate Center. His special areas of interest, study, and research are the conditions and work that is necessary to support prosocial school cultures, where character, caring, fairness, and equity are equally important as academic achievement.

Thank you, dear Phil, for being a pillar of our dignity work since 2004, when our esteemed Don Klein brought you to us. Thank for joining our 2004 workshop and for accepting that we honored you with our 2016 Lifetime Commitment Award! In 2008, you contributed to the Special Symposium Issue of Experiments in Education, "Humiliation in the Academic Setting", published by the S.I.T.U. Council of Educational Research. Professor D. Raja Ganesan, the editor of this Special Symposium Issue, has kindly prepared a "Message to the World" for this workshop on November 10, 2021.

Thank you for sharing:
Summary of a Human Rights Based Child Protection Prevention and Early Intervention Program "Empowering Children, Parents and Schools to Be Safe, Strong and Free", The International Center for Assault Prevention (ICAP), October 2020

Thank you in particular for your important contribution to this book:
• "School Discipline: A Prosocial Perspective." In Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations: Essays on Dignity Studies in Honor of Evelin G. Lindner. Edited by Chipamong Chowdhury, Michael F. Britton, and Linda M. Hartling. Chapter 8. (Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2019)

   

Prue Cauley, Elwood, Victoria, Australia

Prue Cauley is a provisional psychologist, a qualified yoga and meditation teacher, and a mental health educator, with a research Masters in cross-cultural psychology. She has been living and working in diverse settings including humanitarian aid in Northern Greece, the mining industry in Australia and Papua New Guinea, and in mental health research in Norway. She has a particular interest in post-traumatic experiences of refugee populations, on which she has co-authored publications. Prue attended the seminar PSY4506 - Human Rights, Democracy and Reconstruction after Conflict; A community based approach, by Nora Sveaass and Inger Skjelsbæk, with Evelin Lindner's talk "Post-Conflict, Reconstruction, and Reconciliation. The Case of Rwanda” on March 21, 2019.

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Prue! We are very happy to have you with us! WELCOME!

   

Qin Shao, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., China

How can we ever thank Michael Perlin enough, dear Qin, for bringing us together in 2014! Thank you so much for your ongoing loving and dignifying support! We so much admire your work!

Qin Shao is a Professor of History at The College of New Jersey and former research fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies, Harvard University (2007-2008), and at the International Research Center on Work and Lifecycle in Global History, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany (January-July 2013). Her recent work has focused on the human dimension of rapid urbanization in post- Mao China, especially on such issues as mental health, dignity, property rights, and grass-roots resistance. She is working on a new project about the impact of politically induced and imposed physical displacement under Mao. [read more]

Thank you so much for sharing, dear Qin!
The Pursuit of Transitional Justice from Below: A Case Study from Shanghai, by Qin Shao, 2020

   

Rajesh Dixit, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India

Professor Dr. Rajesh Dixit was part of the team that hosted the 2017 Dignity Conference in Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India. He is a poet, author, thinker, and orator, and he is the Vice Chancellor at Renaissance University in Indore, state of Madhya Pradesh, Central India. Prior to that he was the principal of the Renaissance College in Indore. He has earned his doctorate from Vikhram University of Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh. His doctorate was written in Hindi, on Dr. Dharmvir Bharti, who was a great poet and novelist (Dr. Dharmvir Bharti ke Sahitya ka Samagra Anushilan). [read more]

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dr. Rajesh and Dr. Amita, you have no idea how deeply thankful our entire global dignity community is to you for being our wonderful Indian Dignity Family! Thank you so much for opening your home as Dignity Dialogue Home! Our deepest gratitude and admiration goes to you both!

   
 

Ream Dhaher, Erbil, Erbil Governorate, Iraq

Ream Dhaher is a project manager at the Eyzidi Organization for Documentation in Erbil, Erbil Governorate, Iraq. She has been an intern at The Nuremberg Human Rights Center (NMRZ) in Nuremberg, Germany, an independent, non-profit association that advocates for human rights at local, national and international levels.

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Ream! We are very happy to have you with us!

 

Rebecca Nthogo Lekoko, Botswana

Professor Rebecca Nthogo Lekoko is an educator by profession and a full-professor who retired from the University of Botswana in 2021, having taught, researched, published and engaged in lifelong learning, community development, community empowerment, community-based, and participatory research. In 2023, she is working on a contract basis for the government. [read more]
Professor Lekoko has been educated in Botswana, Canada and USA, first as a teacher trainer then an adult educator. She graduated from Pennsylvania State University with a Doctor of Education in Adult Education, specializing in community development. Her professional practices weave together diverse and pertinent issues pertaining to community development such as education for empowerment, social mobilization strategies and participatory approaches.

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Rebecca! We are very happy to have you with us!

   
 

Ronald C. Banks, Brooklyn, New York City

Ronald Banks is both a mediator and community organizer in Brooklyn, New York City, a member of the Greater New York Chapter of the Association for Conflict Resolution (ACR-GNY), and a member of the New York State Dispute Resolution Association (NYSDRA).
He kindly wrote in November 2023: "My primary interest is in areas of dignity through dialogue, conflict transformation and social justice. Throughout my career, I have always been committed to the improvement of the human condition, either as a community organizer, executive director of a community-based not-for-profit organization, or in my work in the political field on behalf of various representative. I have always promoted peace, and the preservation of human dignity in all my endeavors."

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Ronald Banks! We are very happy to have you with us! We thank Maria Volpe for making the work ACR-GNY possible and thus introducing you to our dignity work!

   
 

Roland Darroll, Newlands, Cape Town, South Africa

Roland Darroll is an attorney based in Newlands, Cape Town, who works with social justice.

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Roland Darroll! We are very happy to have you with us!

   
 

Saanwari Sidhwani, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India

Saanwari Sidhwani is the CEO of Word Dealers, the world's first all female localization company, serving in the fields of translation, lingual escorting and simultaneous interpretation (see also Vinita Raj). Saanwari is also a trained classical singer.

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Saanwari Sidhwani! We are very happy to have you with us!

Vinita Raj, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India

Welcome to our workshop, dear Vinita! Our entire global dignity community is grateful for the 2017 Dignity Conference in Indore that YOU helped convene!

   

Sahana Sriskandarajah, Drammen, Norway

Sahana Sriskandarajah She is a programme coordinator at Future Leaders Global in Oslo, Norway, and is mentoring school-children and adolescents (from the age of 6 - 19) in various school subjects and in future education & career planning at MentorNorge AS.

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Sahana! We are very happy to have you with us!

   
 

Sandy Rea, Douglas, Queensland, Australia

Sandy Rea employs a qualitative case study approach in her PhD project at the James Cook University in Douglas, Queensland, Australia, where she investigates the journeys to recovery of high-profile persons who have suffered mental ill-health after the exposure of egregious acts (e.g., a faux pas, adultery, fraud) via mass and social media. Understanding the determinants that high-profile persons utilise to achieve recovery might provide insight into the recovery journeys of various populations and inform clinical practice and theory. Sandy is a practising psychologist and fellow of the College of Educational and Developmental Psychologists. She holds Masters degrees in Educational Psychology and Forensic Psychology. She contributes frequently to the media (television, radio, print).

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Sandy Rea! We are very happy to have you with us!

   
 

Sho Albert, Buffolo, New York

Sho Albert is pursuing a two-year Master’s of Science degree in Creativity and Change Leadership, a program that is chaired by Gerard Puccio, Ph.D., at Buffalo State University.
Sho is interested in dignity education and ecology/climate crises. He was a student of Professor Jacqueline Wasilewski at the International Christian University in Tokyo. She introduced Sho Albert in 2014 as "an amazing person whom I can only call a human development specialist (martial artist, improv performer, sculptor, outdoor educator."

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Sho Albert! We are very happy to have you with us!

   

Stephanie Knox Steiner, San Jose, Costa Rica

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dear Stephanie, we are so glad that Phil Brown brought you to us in June 2023! What a gift! What a dignifier you are! Thank you so much for your deep wisdom and loving care!

Thank you so much for wonderfully hosting, together with Phil Brown, the Dignilogue titled Reimagining Education (Video)!

Stephanie Marie Knox Steiner, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor and Academic Coordinator of the Peace Education programme at the University for Peace (UPEACE) affiliated with the United Nations. [read more]
•  Kindly see the Colloquium "Reimagining and Re-Enchanting Education", June 6, 2023.
•  See Steiner's dissertation titled Decolonial, Pluriversal, Vitality-Centered Pedagogies: (Re)orienting Education Toward Serving Life.

   
 

Susanna Pearce, Ithaca, New York

Welcome to our workshop, dear Susanna!

   
 

Sylvain I. Muller

Sylvain I. Muller advocates for a sustainable world (including Diversity Equality and Inclusion) and strives to overcome discrimination through his work's council capacity.

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Sylvain! We are very happy to have you with us!

   

Takis Ioannides Panagiotis, Athens, Greece

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Takis explained, "Ιf the city is good as a whole, it benefits the citizens more than if everyone is happy individually and the city is shaken as a whole, because even if the person is happy individually, he is nevertheless destroyed together with his homeland if it is destroyed. Thucydides."

We are so grateful, dear Takis, for your dignifying support, since ten years! So lovely to have you with us in our workshop, welcome!

 

Tamer Tolba, Egypt, Hamburg, Germany

Dr. Tamer Tolba is a physicist at the Institute for Experimental Physics of the University of Hamburg (UHH) in Hamburg, Germany. He is the Chair of the Dissemination and Exploitation Board of the ESSnuSB+ project, the principal investigator and country representative of Germany for the ESSnuSB and ESSnuSB+ projects, and was the representative from Germany to the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST), action CA15139.

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dear Tamer, what a gift you are to our global dignity community! I am so glad that we were introduced in fall 2023! You combine sharp scientific analysis with loving care in the most unique and invaluable ways! Thank you!

   
 

Tanveer Hussein

Tanveer Hussein, Advocate High Court, works for social justice and human rights.

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Tanveer! We are very happy to have you with us!

   
 

Thanos York, Toronto, Canada

Thanos York is a York University graduate, social justice activist, community leader and activist, and a creative arts activism (song and dance). He kindly wrote on November 2023: "I'm an anti-humiliation activist, I believe if society did not have humiliation, we would be an evolved human race."

A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Thanos! We are very happy to have you with us!

   

Uli Spalthoff, Southern Germany

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Uli explained, "For me, these are almost synonyms, as solidarity always implied recognizing equal dignity of others."

Ulrich J. Spalthoff, Ph.D., is the Director of Operations of Dignity Press and the World Dignity University initiative's digital platform, the HumanDHS Director of Project Development and System Administration, and a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors.

Dear Uli, we cannot imagine our dignity work without you. You have offered your dignifying support as a free gift for more than ten years now! On behalf of humanity, please allow us to express our deepest gratitude!

Since you got to know our work in 2003 and joined us in 2010, you and your wife have traveled all the way to come to some of our conferences — for instance, the one in 2011 in New Zealand, and the one in 2015 in Rwanda — and with your immense knowledge and expertise you have built up the platform for the World Dignity University initiative, including Dignity Press.

Thank you so much for introducing the WDUi Electronic Learning Platform to this workshop (Video)!

Thank you so much also for your great contribution to Dignilogue 4 on Day Two of last year's workshop, titled, My Experience with the WDU Platform (Video)!

   

Walid Sarhan, Amman, Jordan

Walid Sarhan, MD, FRCPsych, IDFAP, is a Senior Consultant psychiatrist working in Amman, Jordan. He is the Chief Editor of The Arab Journal of Psychiatry, a Member and Fellow of the Royal College of Psychiatrists (FRCPsych), an International Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association (IDFAPA), and an honorary member of the World Psychiatric Association. He is very active in continuous medical education and public awareness building. He has been honored as "the best Arab Psychiatrist in the world" in 2022.

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dear Walid, what a gift you are to our global dignity community, as well as to me personally! I am so glad that we were met in fall 2022 in Amman! Through your care, Amman became my home. You combine incredible intellectual brilliance and scientific analysis with loving care and deep wisdom flowing from decades of experience in the most unique and invaluable ways! Thank you!

   

Wendy Jane Carrel, West Hollywood, California

Wendy Jane Carrel's

Dear Wendy, we thank our dear Carol Smaldino for introducting you to us! A very warm welcome to our workshop for the first time, dear Wendy! We are very happy to have you with us!

   

 


 

Rationale, Methodology, and Frame

 

Rationale

This workshop series is part of a larger process. Each workshop is much more than a stand-alone event. It is part of the overall mission of our global dignity movement, which is to create an atmosphere in which people can meet on a plane of mutual friendship and equality in dignity. The workshop invites its participants to experiment with creating a new culture of global cohesion and togetherness, and to nurture a global family of dignity, a family that truly acts like a good family should act and protects and cherishes our unity in diversity. The workshop invites into enlarging and transcending concepts such private versus public, or family/friends/good neighbors versus "bad neighbors" (or even "enemies"), as well as concepts such as life mission versus job/hobby..

Given the current context of the field of international conflict, the impact of emotions on conflict has become one of the most important questions worldwide. However, there are only scattered publications in the research and applied literature that would address issues on conflict and emotion directly, as well as their relations and their impact on public policy.

The first one-day meeting was held at Teachers College, Columbia University, in 2002, convened by Morton Deutsch personally, the first two-day workshop in 2004, hosted by the Columbia University's Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN), since 2009, AC4 stepped into the place of CU-CRN), with special help from SIPA – Center for International Conflict Resolution (CICR) and The Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR)

Since 2004, CICR on behalf of CU-CRN and later AC4, together with the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network and, since 2011, also the World Dignity University (WDU) initiative, invites selected groups of scholars, counselors, conflict resolution practitioners, mediators, and teachers among other professions for a two-day workshop every year to explore issues of conflict and emotions and its application to actual negotiations and diplomacy. The aim is to particularly probe the role of the notion of humiliation from the two different angles of conflict and emotion.

The workshops are envisaged as a learning community gathering, interactive and highly participatory. The purpose is to create an open space to identify and sharpen our understanding of the discourse and debate on emotion and conflict and the role that might, or might not be played by humiliation within this field. We hope to be able to continue this effort in follow-up workshops in the future.

We see humiliation as entry point into broader analysis and not as "single interest scholarship." We are aware that most participants focus on other aspects than humiliation in their work and have not thought about humiliation much, or even at all. We do not expect anybody to do so beforehand. We encourage that everybody comes with his/her background, his/her theoretical concepts and tools, and that we, during the conference, reflect together. We invite everybody to use their focus and give a thought to whether the notion of humiliation could be enriching, or not, and if yes, in what way. We warmly invite diverging and dissenting views.

How We Go About

In our conferences, we choose a dialogical methodology that stresses interaction and participation, because we wish to create an atmosphere of openness and respectful inquiry through "dignity dialogues" or dignilogues and, when appropriate, the use of Open Space Technology. We believe that notions such as dignity and respect for equal dignity are important not only for conflict resolution, but also for conferences such as our workshops. The name Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies attempts to express this. We wish to strive for consistency between what we think are important values for conflict resolution, and the way we conduct our work and our conferences.

We believe in "waging good conflict" (Jean Baker Miller). We believe that diverging opinions and perspectives need to be expressed and not avoided, because diversity enriches. However, diversity only enriches if embedded into mutual connection and appreciation. If not harnessed lovingly and caringly, diversity has the potential to divide, create hostility, and foster hatred and even violence. In the spirit of our vision, we, the HumanDHS network, wish therefore to avoid the latter and foster an atmosphere of common ground and mutually caring connections as a space for the safe expression of even the deepest differences and disagreements, and the toughest questions of humiliation, trauma, and injustice.

Every dignilogue is being opened by brief remarks by each participant to present their entry points into the inquiry. In order to facilitate feedback, we wish to make available a brief synopsis of 1 to 4 pages, preferably with references, from each participant, prior to the workshop through this site so that all participants can meet virtually before meeting in person. Longer papers are welcome as well both prior and subsequent to our workshops, not least for the envisaged publications of the results of our conferences. Please notify us, if you wish to submit any of your papers also as a book chapter or as a journal article in our Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies.

All participants are warmly invited to send in their papers as soon as they can. We would be grateful if you could help us by formatting your contribution as follows:
1. Title: bold and in a large font.
2. The author's name under the title, proceeded by a copyright sign Creative Commona.
3. In case the text is longer than one page: A footer for the name of the author, and a header for the title and the page number (in Word, you can use View > Header and Footer > Page Setup > Different first page, etc.).
4. Spacing: Single-spacing.
5. For non-natural English speakers who need support to make a text readable, please let us know and we try to find help.
5. The final Word document needs to be transformed into a Pdf file (use, for example, convert.neevia.com), and given a name. Please use your family name, and then identify the conference, in case of the 2008 NY workshop, this would read as follows: "FamilynameNY08meeting."
6. Please send us both you Word and Pdf files. Thank you!

Peace Linguist Francisco Gomes de Matos commented on this format as follows (May 2, 2012): "It enhances RELATIONAL DIGNITY. Everyone will make the most of such dignifyingly used time! A great humanizing, interactive format: a little bit of MONOlogue, followed by much DIALOGUE, will help create DIGNILOGUE."

Frame

by Linda M. Hartling, Ph.D., Director of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (until 2008 Associate Director of the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute at Wellesley College in Boston, USA)

In our conferences we aim at creating a humiliation-free, collaborative learning environment characterized by mutual respect, mutual empathy, and openness to difference. The perspective of appreciative enquiry is a useful frame of our work. Our HumanDHS efforts are not just about the work we do together, but also about HOW WE WORK TOGETHER. At appropriate points during our conferences, for example at the end of each day, we take a moment to reflect on the practices observed that contributed to an appreciative/humiliation-free learning experience.

It is important to emphasize that an appreciative approach is not about expecting people to agree. In fact, differences of opinion enrich the conversation and deepen people's understanding of ideas. This could be conceptualized as "waging good conflict" (Jean Baker Miller), which means practicing radical respect for differences and being open to a variety of perspectives and engaging others without contempt or rankism. As we have seen in many fields, contempt and rankism drain energy away from the important work that needs to be done. Most people only know "conflict" as a form of war within a win/lose frame. "Waging good conflict," on the other side, is about being empathic and respectful, making room for authenticity, creating clarity, and growth.

Please see also the following background material, mainly created by Linda Hartling:
Dignilogue Tips and Dynamic Dignilogue List, created on October 10, 2015, for the 2015 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, in New York City, December 3 – 4, 2015.
Dignilogue: An Introduction to Dignity + Dialogue, created on 31th May 2015 for the 2015 Kigali Conference
Greetings to All (short version), created on 16h April 2013 for the 2013 South Africa Conference
Greetings to All (long version), created on 16h April 2013 for the 2013 South Africa Conference
Welcome to Everybody, created on 12th August 2012 for the 2012 Norway Conference
Our Open Space Dignilogue Format, created on 12th August 2012 for the 2012 Norway Conference
• A Summary of Our Dignilogue Format for you to download
An Appreciative Frame: Beginning a Dialogue on Human Dignity and Humiliation, written by Linda Hartling in 2005
See also:
Appreciative Facilitation: Hints for Dignilogue Moderators, written by Judith Thompson in February 2006 to support the moderators of our workshops
Buddhist Teachings on Right Speech, kindly provided to us by Thomas Daffern in 2006, relating to our quest for appreciative enquiry, caring and being

• Please see also the videos on our Appreciative Frame, created by Linda Hartling:
- Appreciative Frame, recorded on November 21, 2023, in Portland, Oregon, USA, for our 2023 New York Workshop
- Appreciative Frame, recorded on August 23, 2022, in Portland, Oregon, USA, for our 37th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, in Amman, Jordan, 5th – 7th September 2022
- Appreciative Frame, recorded on December 9, 2021, for our 2021 New York Workshop
- Appreciative Frame, recorded on December 10, 2020, for our 2020 New York Workshop
- Appreciative Frame, recorded on December 5, 2019, for our 2019 New York Workshop
- Appreciative Frame, recorded on December 8, 2016, at the 2016 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, in New York City, December 8 – 9, 2016
- Appreciative Enquiry 4, recorded on May 27, 2015, in Portland, Oregon, USA, for the 25th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, in Kigali, Rwanda, 2nd – 5th June 2015
- Our Appreciative Frame 3, a video created in December 2014 (see also Pdf), for the 2014 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, in New York City, December 4 – 5, 2014
- Appreciative Enquiry 2, a video that was uploaded onto YouTube on August 11, 2012, in preparation of the 19th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, 27th – 30th August 2012, in Oslo, Norway
- Appreciative Enquiry 1, a video that was recorded on October 30, 2011, in Portland, Oregon, USA, by Evelin Lindner, for the World Dignity University initiative

 



List of Conveners

Honorary Convener 2003 – 2017: Morton Deutsch (February 4, 1920 – March 13, 2017), E. L. Thorndike Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Education, and Director Emeritus of The Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR), Teachers College, Columbia University

Morton Deutsch has been one of the world's most respected scholars and the founder of The Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR). MD-ICCCR was part of the Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN), and since 2009 co-founded the Advanced Consortium on Cooperation, Conflict, and Complexity (AC4). Professor Deutsch has been widely honored for his scientific contributions involving research on cooperation and competition, social justice, group dynamics, and conflict resolution. He has published extensively and is well known for his pioneering studies in intergroup relations, social conformity, and the social psychology of justice. His books include: Interracial Housing (1951); Theories in Social Psychology (1965); The Resolution of Conflict (1973); Distributive Justice (1985); and The Handbook of Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice (2000, 2nd edition 2006). Please note, in particular, Morton Deutsch's pledge titled Imagine a Global Human Community and its progress.
Morton Deutsch has been a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board since the inception of our dignity work in 2001, and, in 2014, he accepted, "with delight," our invitation to be our HumanDHS Board of Directors Honorary Lifetime Member. Morton Deutsch has also been the first recipient of the HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award, which he received at the 2009 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict. Furthermore, Morton Deutsch has been a Founding Member of the World Dignity University initiative.
Morton Deutsch founded this workshop series in 2003 and has been its Honorary Convener until his passing in 2017. We will honor his memory by conducting this workshop also in the future. The first "Annual Round Table of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies" (as we called it then) was convened by Morton Deutsch at the MC-ICCCR on July 7, 2003, with Peter T. Coleman, Beth Fisher-Yoshida, Janet Gerson, Andrea Bartoli, Michelle Fine, and Susan Opotow and as participants.
We wish to give special thanks to Peter Coleman, Beth Fisher-Yoshida, and Janet Gerson for their ongoing substantive support for our dignity work since 2001. Andrea Bartoli inspired this workshop series and helped design it in 2003. He was at that time the Director of the Center for International Conflict Resolution (CICR) at the School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University, and Chairman of the Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN). Andrea Bartoli is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board since its inception. Also his successor, Aldo Civico, kindly supported this workshop, as did his successor, Jean-Marie Guéhenno, who became the President of the International Crisis Group in 2014. We wish to give special thanks to all three for their kind support. Since 2015, CIRC is dormant and the Arnold A. Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies (SIWPS) at the School of International and Public Affairs offers courses in specialization in conflict resolution (ICR Concentration).

Linda M. Hartling, Ph.D., Social Psychologist, organizer of the HumanDHS conferences, in support of the local conveners

Linda M. Hartling, Ph.D., is the recipient of the 2015 Human Dignity (Half!) Lifetime Commitment Award.
She is the Director of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) and contributes to the leadership and development of workshops, conferences, Dignity Press publications, and the World Dignity University initiative. She works in daily collaboration with HumanDHS Founding President Evelin Lindner and is the key creator of the Dignity Letter. She is also a member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, HumanDHS Global Core Team, HumanDHS Global Coordinating Team, HumanDHS Research Team, and HumanDHS Education Team.
Linda Hartling's husband Richard Slaven, formerly Brandeis University, Massachusetts, U.S.A., is the Director of HumanDHS Dignifunding. Richard Slaven is a Member of the Board of Directors of HumanDHS, he is a member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and a Member of the HumanDHS Planning Committee. He is the recipient of the 2014 HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award.
Prior to the founding of HumanDHS, Linda Hartling was the Associate Director the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMTI) at the Stone Center, which was part of the Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College in Massachusetts. She worked closely with Jean Baker Miller, MD, and other colleagues on the development of Relational-Cultural Theory. She holds a doctoral degree in clinical/community psychology and she developed the first scale to assess the internal experience of humiliation in 1996, which has been translated into many languages. In addition, she has published papers and chapters on resilience, substance abuse prevention, shame and humiliation, relational practice in the workplace, and Relational-Cultural Theory. [read more]
Linda Hartling kindly co-edited this book, wrote the Foreword and the final chapter:
"Moving Beyond Humiliation: A Relational Conceptualization of Human Rights." In Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations: Essays on Dignity Studies in Honor of Evelin G. Lindner. Edited by Chipamong Chowdhury, Michael Britton, and Linda Hartling. Chapter 15. Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2019
Please see also:
• Humiliation: Real Pain, A Pathway to Violence, the draft of Linda's paper for Round Table 2 of our 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City
Humiliation: Assessing the Impact of Derision, Degradation, and Debasement, first published in The Journal of Primary Prevention, 19(4): 259-278, co-authored with T. Luchetta, 1999
• Shame and Humiliation: From Isolation to Relational Transformation, the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMIT), Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College No. 88, Wellesley, MA 02481, co-authored with Wendy Rosen, Maureen Walker, Judith V. Jordan, 2000.
• Humiliation and Assistance: Telling the Truth About Power, Telling a New Story, paper prepared for the 5th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies 'Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People', in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005
•  Dignilogue Tips and Dynamic Dignilogue List, created on October 10, 2015, for the 2015 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, in New York City, December 3 – 4, 2015
Mini-Documentary of the Annual Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict "The Globalization of Dignity," December 8 - 9, 2016
See also Linda Hartling's introductions to the Appreciative Frame that we use in our work.
[read more]

Evelin Gerda Lindner, Medical Doctor, Clinical and Social Psychologist, Ph.D. (Dr. med.), Ph.D. (Dr. psychol.), organizer of the HumanDHS conferences, in supporting of the local conveners

Evelin Gerda Lindner is the Founding President of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network and initiator of the World Dignity University initiative. She is a transdisciplinary social scientist and humanist who holds two Ph.D.s, one in medicine and one in psychology. In 1996, she designed a research project on the concept of humiliation and its role in genocide and war. German history served as starting point. She is the recipient of the 2006 SBAP Award, the 2009 "Prisoner’s Testament" Peace Award, the 2014 HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award, and she has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2015, 2016, and 2017. She is affiliated with the Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN), which was superseded, in 2009, by the Advanced Consortium on Cooperation, Conflict, and Complexity (AC4), at Columbia University, New York City. She is also affiliated with the University of Oslo, Norway, with its Norwegian Centre for Human Rights, and with its Department of Psychology (folk.uio.no/evelinl/), and, furthermore, with the Maison des Sciences de l'Homme in Paris. Lindner is teaching globally, including in South East Asia, the Middle East, Australia, Africa, and other places globally. [read more]
Please see:
Interview with Evelin Lindner - Challenges of our Time; Learning to Connect, December 8, 2016
Mini-Documentary of the Annual Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict "The Globalization of Dignity," December 8 - 9, 2016

 


 

Participants in all NY workshops since 2003

 


 

Papers

All participants are warmly invited to send in full papers after the workshop.
Please notify us, if you wish to submit any of your papers also as a book chapter or as a journal article in our Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies.

Please see earlier submitted papers here:
•  List of all Publications
•  2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2007 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2008 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2009 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2010 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2011 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2012 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2013 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2014 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2015 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2016 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2017 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2018 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2019 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2020 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2021 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2022 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2023 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict

 

Abstracts/Notes/Papers of 2023

Please see further down the papers/notes that participants send in prior to the workshop so that everybody can get acquainted with all others beforehand.

See here the work by:
Andrea Bartoli
Linda M. Hartling
Donald C. Klein

Victoria C. Fontan

Evelin G. Lindner

Michael Britton (2023)
Carriers of Hope: Don Klein Celebration Lecture (Video | Video recorded on December 6, 2023 | Video thank you!)
Annual Lecture at the 20th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, titled "The Urgency of Seeding Dignity: Honoring 20 Years of Global Collaboration for Transforming Suffering Through Courageous and Compassionate Action," hybrid, co-hosted online and in person by the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City, December 8, 2023.

David C. Yamada (2023)
Effecting Change: Maintaining, While Venturing Beyond, Our Safe Circles (Video 1 online | Video 2 room | Video 3 online | Video 4 postscript | Video thank you! | Pdf)
A Workshop within a Workshop at the 20th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, titled "The Urgency of Seeding Dignity: Honoring 20 Years of Global Collaboration for Transforming Suffering Through Courageous and Compassionate Action," hybrid, co-hosted online and in person by the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City, December 8, 2023.

Francisco Gomes de Matos (2023)
Francisco Gomes de Matos is the recipient of the 2023 HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award (Video award ceremony | Video acceptance speech pre-recorded on November 26, 2023)
The 20th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, titled "The Urgency of Seeding Dignity: Honoring 20 Years of Global Collaboration for Transforming Suffering Through Courageous and Compassionate Action," hybrid, co-hosted online and in person by the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City, December 8, 2023.

Janet Gerson (2023)
Meet and Greet – Small Group Dignilogues – Introduced by Janet Gerson (Video)
The 20th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, titled "The Urgency of Seeding Dignity: Honoring 20 Years of Global Collaboration for Transforming Suffering Through Courageous and Compassionate Action," hybrid, co-hosted online and in person by the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City, December 8, 2023.

Janet Gerson and Elaine Meis (2023)
Host of the Dignilogue titled Seeding Dignity Through Collaborative Action (in four parts, two online and two in person):
In person:
Humiliation Trauma with Sharon Steinborn and Peter Pollard
Movement for Building Movements: Engagement and Collaboration, Including the Arts with Martha Eddy
Online:
Giving and Receiving Simple Acts of Kindness as Seeds of Dignity with Beth Boyton (Video)
Reimagining Education with Phil Brown and Stephanie Knox Steiner (Video)
The 20th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, titled "The Urgency of Seeding Dignity: Honoring 20 Years of Global Collaboration for Transforming Suffering Through Courageous and Compassionate Action," hybrid, co-hosted online and in person by the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City, December 8, 2023.

Janet Gerson (2023)
Janet Gerson Explains the Metaphor of the Lotus Flower (Video)
The 20th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, titled "The Urgency of Seeding Dignity: Honoring 20 Years of Global Collaboration for Transforming Suffering Through Courageous and Compassionate Action," hybrid, co-hosted online and in person by the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City, December 8, 2023.

Beth Boynton (2023)
Host of the Dignilogue titled Giving and Receiving Simple Acts of Kindness as Seeds of Dignity (Video)
The 20th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, titled "The Urgency of Seeding Dignity: Honoring 20 Years of Global Collaboration for Transforming Suffering Through Courageous and Compassionate Action," hybrid, co-hosted online and in person by the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City, December 8, 2023.

Stephanie Knox Steiner and Phil Brown (2023)
Hosts of the Dignilogue titled Reimagining Education (Video)
The 20th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, titled "The Urgency of Seeding Dignity: Honoring 20 Years of Global Collaboration for Transforming Suffering Through Courageous and Compassionate Action," hybrid, co-hosted online and in person by the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City, December 8, 2023.

Sharon Steinborn and Peter Pollard (2023)
Hosts of the Dignilogue titled Humiliation Trauma.
The 20th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, titled "The Urgency of Seeding Dignity: Honoring 20 Years of Global Collaboration for Transforming Suffering Through Courageous and Compassionate Action," hybrid, co-hosted online and in person by the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City, December 8, 2023.

Martha Eddy (2023)
Host of the Dignilogue titled Giving and Receiving Simple Acts of Kindness as Seeds of Dignity.
The 20th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, titled "The Urgency of Seeding Dignity: Honoring 20 Years of Global Collaboration for Transforming Suffering Through Courageous and Compassionate Action," hybrid, co-hosted online and in person by the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City, December 8, 2023.

Lucien Lombardo (2023)
Lucien Lombardo Shares His Experiences (Video)
20th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, titled "The Urgency of Seeding Dignity: Honoring 20 Years of Global Collaboration for Transforming Suffering Through Courageous and Compassionate Action," hybrid, co-hosted online and in person by the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City, December 8, 2023.


 

Material