2020 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
representing the
35th Annual HumanDHS Conference
and the Seventeenth Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
"From a Virus Pandemic to a Pandemic of Dignity:
How Can We Escape Complicity with Institutionalized Humiliation?"
December 10 – 12, 2020
Program

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, this conference takes place online
Rather than two long days as in the past years, we will be meeting for three shorter days, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, each day 11.00 am – 3.30 pm New York City Time


Please return regularly to this site, all relevant information will appear here, it will evolve until after the workshop
See also our Dignity Letter – September 2020 – Standing Together... Be with Us in December, sent out on 31st August 2020
To get an impression of last year's workshop, you may have a look at its site and program

All

Hosted by
The Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution
(MD-ICCCR)
Columbia University, Teachers College (TC)
525 West 120th Street, New York City, NY 10027
in cooperation with the World Dignity University initiative

Honorary Convenor Since 2003
(he passed away in March 2017, and we honor his memory)
Morton Deutsch
First HumanDHS Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient

Linda Hartling & Morton Deutsch & Evelin Lindner
Evelin Lindner, Morton Deutsch, Linda Hartling,
(This photo was taken in 2014
Please click on the picture above to it larger)

Our workshops are invitations to all HumanDHS friends and members to explore how we can best deepen, grow, and practice the global message of dignity — now and far into the future.

If you wish to participate in our workshops, please send an email to workshops@humiliationstudies.org. Please know that you are always invited to spend the entire workshop with us, so that true dignity-family-building can emerge. All our events are part of an ongoing effort to nurture a global dignity community. The workshop series follows a format of organic growth, and is thus different from mainstream conferences. In all our events, our aim is to create a community, rather than having an "audience" listen to "speakers."
All participants are warmly invited to fill out our Appreciative Introduction form and send it to us.

There is no registration fee, we use to share minimal cost according to ability at the end. Our work is a labor of love and maintained entirely by volunteers who give their time and energy as a gift. All our efforts are pro bono and not-for-profit endeavors. Everyone who participates does so because of dignity, because of their appreciation for our work for dignity. Nobody is there "for the money," nobody is being paid, there is no "paid staff." This is our way of walking our talk of "being the change we want to see in the world."

•  Personal invitation letter 2020
•  Invitations to the workshop: See your invitation from our The Dignity Letter – May 2020 – Building a Vision of Healing and Hope, sent out on 27th April 2020
•  Please have a look at a compilation of all NY workshops and the newsletters written after these conferences.
•  This workshop is the seventeenth in a series that began in 2003. See an overview over all our previous conferences and see the workshops of 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019.



 

Program of 2020 (please return regularly to this site, all relevant information will appear here)

 

Day One, Thursday, December 10, 2020

 

11.00 – 11.15 am Welcome and Greetings

 

11.15 – 11.30 am Introductions & Connection and Reflection Groups – Meet & Greet

 

11.30 – 12.15 pm Don Klein Memorial Lecture — Michael Britton: "From a Virus Pandemic to a Pandemic of Dignity” (with sharing)

 

12.15 – 12.30 pm Connection and Reflection Groups (reflecting on talk): Question for Conversation

 

12.30 - 12.45 pm Introducing Our DigniZooming Approach to Digniloguing

 

12.45 – 1.30 pm Dignilogue #1:

 

1.30 – 1.45 pm Connection and Reflection Groups following Dignilogue #1: Question for Conversation

 

1.45 - 2.00 pm “Coffee Break” with Music, Movement, Poetry (please mute microphones)

 

2.00 - 2.45 pm Dignilogue #2:

 

2.45 – 3.15 pm Connection and Reflection Groups following Dignilogue #2: Question for Conversation

 

3.15 – 3.30 pm General Reflections and Invitation to Day 2

 

3.45 - 4.30 pm Bonus: Creative Connections Sessions: Movement, Music, Poetry, Storytelling, etc.

 


 

Day Two, Friday, December 11, 2020

 

11.00 – 11.15 am Welcome, Check In

 

11.15 – 11.30 am Day #2 Connection and Reflection Groups (meeting your new group)

 

11.30 – 12.15 pm Dignilogue #3:

 

12.15 – 12.30 pm Connection and Reflection Groups following Dignilogue #3

 

12.30 – 1.15 pm Dignilogue #4:

 

1.15 – 1.45 pm Connection and Reflection Groups following Dignilogue #4

 

1.45 – 2.00 pm “Coffee Break” with Music, Movement, Poetry (please mute microphones)

 

2.00 - 2.30 pm Lifetime Commitment Award and Appreciations

 

2.30 – 3.15 pm Introducing and Recording “Messages to the World”

 

3.15 – 3.30 pm General Reflections & Invitation to Day 3, Music, Movement, Poetry  

 

3.45 - 4.30 pm Bonus Zoom Room Opportunities

 


 

Day Three, Saturday, December 12, 2020

 

11.00 – 11.15 am Welcome & Check in

 

11.15 – 11.30 am Day #3 - Connection and Reflection Groups (meeting your new group)

 

11.30 – 12.15 pm Evelin Lindner — “For a Future of Global Solidarity” with sharing

 

12.15 – 12.30 pm Connection and Reflection Groups — Deepening the Conversation

 

12.30 – 1.15 pm Dignilogue #5:

 

1.15 – 1.30 pm Connection and Reflection Groups following Dignilogue #5

 

1.30 – 1.45 “Coffee Break” with Music, Movement, Poetry (please mute microphones)

 

1.45 – 2.15 “Messages to the World” Preparation in Groups

 

2.15 - 3.00 Sharing and Recording “Messages to the World”

 

3.00 – 3.30 Closing Community Connection and Celebration  

 

3.30 Bring your own Pizza Party

 


 

Practical details

•  Green conference and reinventing organization
We strive to organize our conferences as "Green Conferences". Lynn King kindly advised us. We also thank Vegard Jordanger for making us aware of Frederic Laloux's work on Reinventing Organizations (2014).

•  Please kindly note that...
• There is no registration fee for our conferences. To cover our expenses, we usually summarize the costs during the conference and invite participants to contribute according to their ability. This collaborative approach to financing allows us to keep the conference affordable for all.
• We like to get to know participants prior to our conferences and workshops, and prior to issuing an invitation.
• All our gatherings are by invitation only, please approach us so that we can include you and register you. Only our Public Events are open to everybody without registration.
• The Non-Public Parts of our gatherings have limited enrollment.
• Participants are encouraged to find their own sources of funding or economic support to participate in our conferences (please help us to continuously update this section!) We offer our nurturing work as our gift of love and care to you, ad we would like to lovingly invite everybody to contribute to this gift economy. If you need funding for your travels and housing, please inquire in your country and your university about possibilities. See, among others, for the US, www.supportcenteronline.org and www.foundationscenter.org. The Weinstein International Fellowship program, inaugurated in 2008, provides opportunities for individuals from outside the United States to visit the U.S. to learn more about dispute resolution processes and practices and to pursue a project of their own design that serves to advance the resolution of disputes in their home countries.
• Participants are kindly asked to handle all of their travel arrangements and required documentation, including requests for visas, on their side. HumanDHS is a volunteer initiative and does not have the staff or resources to assist with visa requests.

•  Permissions
During our conferences, we always ask all participants for their permission to have their pictures or videos posted on our website, however, if you change your mind later, either in total or for specific pictures/videos, please let us know! Thank you! Since we wish to walk the talk of dignity, it is very important for us to do our utmost in respecting everybody's privacy. We refrain from gathering written permissions from you during our conferences, since we value the building of mutual trust in relationships, and we also would like to refrain from contributing to an ever more bureaucratic and legalistic society.

 


 

Rationale, Methodology, and Frame

 

Rationale

This workshop series is part of a larger process. Each workshop is much more than a stand-alone event. It is part of the overall mission of our global dignity movement, which is to create an atmosphere in which people can meet on a plane of mutual friendship and equality in dignity. The workshop invites its participants to experiment with creating a new culture of global cohesion and togetherness, and to nurture a global family of dignity, a family that truly acts like a good family should act and protects and cherishes our unity in diversity. The workshop invites into enlarging and transcending concepts such private versus public, or family/friends/good neighbors versus "bad neighbors" (or even "enemies"), as well as concepts such as life mission versus job/hobby..

Given the current context of the field of international conflict, the impact of emotions on conflict has become one of the most important questions worldwide. However, there are only scattered publications in the research and applied literature that would address issues on conflict and emotion directly, as well as their relations and their impact on public policy.

The first one-day meeting was held at Teachers College, Columbia University, in 2002, convened by Morton Deutsch personally, the first two-day workshop in 2004, hosted by the Columbia University's Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN), since 2009, AC4 stepped into the place of CU-CRN), with special help from SIPA – Center for International Conflict Resolution (CICR) and The Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR)

Since 2004, CICR on behalf of CU-CRN and later AC4, together with the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network and, since 2011, also the World Dignity University (WDU) initiative, invites selected groups of scholars, counselors, conflict resolution practitioners, mediators, and teachers among other professions for a two-day workshop every year to explore issues of conflict and emotions and its application to actual negotiations and diplomacy. The aim is to particularly probe the role of the notion of humiliation from the two different angles of conflict and emotion.

The workshops are envisaged as a learning community gathering, interactive and highly participatory. The purpose is to create an open space to identify and sharpen our understanding of the discourse and debate on emotion and conflict and the role that might, or might not be played by humiliation within this field. We hope to be able to continue this effort in follow-up workshops in the future.

We see humiliation as entry point into broader analysis and not as "single interest scholarship." We are aware that most participants focus on other aspects than humiliation in their work and have not thought about humiliation much, or even at all. We do not expect anybody to do so beforehand. We encourage that everybody comes with his/her background, his/her theoretical concepts and tools, and that we, during the conference, reflect together. We invite everybody to use their focus and give a thought to whether the notion of humiliation could be enriching, or not, and if yes, in what way. We warmly invite diverging and dissenting views.

How We Go About

In our conferences, we choose a dialogical methodology that stresses interaction and participation, because we wish to create an atmosphere of openness and respectful inquiry through "dignity dialogues" or dignilogues and, when appropriate, the use of Open Space Technology. We believe that notions such as dignity and respect for equal dignity are important not only for conflict resolution, but also for conferences such as our workshops. The name Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies attempts to express this. We wish to strive for consistency between what we think are important values for conflict resolution, and the way we conduct our work and our conferences.

We believe in "waging good conflict" (Jean Baker Miller). We believe that diverging opinions and perspectives need to be expressed and not avoided, because diversity enriches. However, diversity only enriches if embedded into mutual connection and appreciation. If not harnessed lovingly and caringly, diversity has the potential to divide, create hostility, and foster hatred and even violence. In the spirit of our vision, we, the HumanDHS network, wish therefore to avoid the latter and foster an atmosphere of common ground and mutually caring connections as a space for the safe expression of even the deepest differences and disagreements, and the toughest questions of humiliation, trauma, and injustice.

Every dignilogue is being opened by brief remarks by each participant to present their entry points into the inquiry. In order to facilitate feedback, we wish to make available a brief synopsis of 1 to 4 pages, preferably with references, from each participant, prior to the workshop through this site so that all participants can meet virtually before meeting in person. Longer papers are welcome as well both prior and subsequent to our workshops, not least for the envisaged publications of the results of our conferences. Please notify us, if you wish to submit any of your papers also as a book chapter or as a journal article in our Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies.

All participants are warmly invited to send in their papers as soon as they can. We would be grateful if you could help us by formatting your contribution as follows:
1. Title: bold and in a large font.
2. The author's name under the title, proceded by a copyright sign Creative Commona.
3. In case the text is longer than one page: A footer for the name of the author, and a header for the title and the page number (in Word, you can use View > Header and Footer > Page Setup > Different first page, etc.).
4. Spacing: Single-spacing.
5. For non-natural English speakers who need support to make a text readable, please let us know and we try to find help.
5. The final Word document needs to be transformed into a Pdf file (use, for example, convert.neevia.com), and given a name. Please use your family name, and then identify the conference, in case of the 2008 NY workshop, this would read as follows: "FamilynameNY08meeting."
6. Please send us both you Word and Pdf files. Thank you!

Peace Linguist Francisco Gomes de Matos commented on this format as follows (May 2, 2012): "It enhances RELATIONAL DIGNITY. Everyone will make the most of such dignifyingly used time! A great humanizing, interactive format: a little bit of MONOlogue, followed by much DIALOGUE, will help create DIGNILOGUE."

Frame

by Linda M. Hartling, Ph.D., Director of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (until 2008 Associate Director of the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute at Wellesley College in Boston, USA)

In our conferences we aim at creating a humiliation-free, collaborative learning environment characterized by mutual respect, mutual empathy, and openness to difference. The perspective of "appreciative enquiry" is a useful frame of our work. Our HumanDHS efforts are not just about the work we do together, but also about HOW WE WORK TOGETHER. At appropriate points during our conferences, for example at the end of each day, we take a moment to reflect on the practices observed that contributed to an appreciative/humiliation-free learning experience.

It is important to emphasize that an appreciative approach is not about expecting people to agree. In fact, differences of opinion enrich the conversation and deepen people's understanding of ideas. This could be conceptualized as "waging good conflict" (Jean Baker Miller), which means practicing radical respect for differences and being open to a variety of perspectives and engaging others without contempt or rankism. As we have seen in many fields, contempt and rankism drain energy away from the important work that needs to be done. Most people only know "conflict" as a form of war within a win/lose frame. "Waging good conflict," on the other side, is about being empathic and respectful, making room for authenticity, creating clarity, and growth.

Please see also the following background material, mainly created by Linda Hartling:
Dignilogue Tips and Dynamic Dignilogue List, created on October 10, 2015, for the 2015 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, in New York City, December 3 – 4, 2015.
Dignilogue: An Introduction to Dignity + Dialogue, created on 31th May 2015 for the 2015 Kigali Conference
Greetings to All (short version), created on 16h April 2013 for the 2013 South Africa Conference
Greetings to All (long version), created on 16h April 2013 for the 2013 South Africa Conference
Welcome to Everybody, created on 12th August 2012 for the 2012 Norway Conference
Our Open Space Dignilogue Format, created on 12th August 2012 for the 2012 Norway Conference
• A Summary of Our Dignilogue Format for you to download
An Appreciative Frame: Beginning a Dialogue on Human Dignity and Humiliation, written by Linda Hartling in 2005
Appreciative Facilitation: Hints for Dignilogue Moderators, written by Judith Thompson in February 2006 to support the moderators of our workshops
Buddhist Teachings on Right Speech, which relate to our quest for appreciative enquiry, caring and being

• Please see also the videos on our Appreciative Frame, created by Linda Hartling:
- Linda Hartling Introduces the Appreciative Frame of the Workshop (2019)
- Appreciative Frame, by Linda Hartling on December 8, 2016, at the 2016 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, in New York City, December 8 – 9, 2016.
- Appreciative Enquiry 4, a video that was recorded on May 27, 2015, in Portland, Oregon, USA, by Linda Hartling, for the 25th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, in Kigali, Rwanda, 2nd - 5th June 2015.
- Our Appreciative Frame 3, a video created in December 2014 (see also Pdf), for the 2014 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, in New York City, December 4–5, 2014.
- Appreciative Enquiry 2, a video that was uploaded onto YouTube on August 11, 2012, in preparation of the 19th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, 27th-30th August 2012, in Oslo, Norway.
- Appreciative Enquiry 1, a video that was recorded on October 30, 2011, in Portland, Oregon, USA, by Evelin Lindner, for the World Dignity University initiative.

 



List of Conveners

Honorary Convener 2003 – 2017: Morton Deutsch (February 4, 1920 – March 13, 2017), E. L. Thorndike Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Education, and Director Emeritus of The Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR), Teachers College, Columbia University

Morton Deutsch has been one of the world's most respected scholars and the founder of The Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR). MD-ICCCR was part of the Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN), and since 2009 co-founded the Advanced Consortium on Cooperation, Conflict, and Complexity (AC4). Professor Deutsch has been widely honored for his scientific contributions involving research on cooperation and competition, social justice, group dynamics, and conflict resolution. He has published extensively and is well known for his pioneering studies in intergroup relations, social conformity, and the social psychology of justice. His books include: Interracial Housing (1951); Theories in Social Psychology (1965); The Resolution of Conflict (1973); Distributive Justice (1985); and The Handbook of Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice (2000, 2nd edition 2006). Please note, in particular, Morton Deutsch's pledge titled Imagine a Global Human Community and its progress.
Morton Deutsch has been a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board since the inception of our dignity work in 2001, and, in 2014, he accepted, "with delight," our invitation to be our HumanDHS Board of Directors Honorary Lifetime Member. Morton Deutsch has also been the first recipient of the HumanDHS Lifetime Achievement Award, which he received at the 2009 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict. Furthermore, Morton Deutsch has been a Founding Member of the World Dignity University initiative.
Morton Deutsch founded this workshop series in 2003 and has been its Honorary Convener until his passing in 2017. We will honor his memory by conducting this workshop also in the future. The first "Annual Round Table of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies" (as we called it then) was convened by Morton Deutsch at the MC-ICCCR on July 7, 2003, with Peter T. Coleman, Beth Fisher-Yoshida, Janet Gerson, Andrea Bartoli, Michelle Fine, and Susan Opotow and as participants.
We wish to give special thanks to Peter Coleman, Beth Fisher-Yoshida, and Janet Gerson for their ongoing substantive support for our dignity work since 2001. Andrea Bartoli inspired this workshop series and helped design it in 2003. He was then the Director of the Center for International Conflict Resolution (CICR) at the School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University, and Chairman of the Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN). Andrea Bartoli is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board since its inception. Also his successor, Aldo Civico, kindly supported this workshop, as did his successor, Jean-Marie Guéhenno, who became the President of the International Crisis Group in 2014. We wish to give special thanks to all three for their kind support. Since 2015, CIRC is dormant and the Arnold A. Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies (SIWPS) at the School of International and Public Affairs offers courses in specialization in conflict resolution (ICR Concentration).

Linda M. Hartling, Ph.D., Social Psychologist, organizer of the HumanDHS conferences, in support of the local conveners

Dr. Linda M. Hartling is the Director of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS). She is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, HumanDHS Global Core Team, HumanDHS Global Coordinating Team, HumanDHS Research Team, and HumanDHS Education Team. She is the Editor of the Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (JHDHS).
Linda is affiliated with the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMTI) at the Stone Center, which is part of the Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College in Massachusetts. Until November 2008, she was its Associate Director. Linda is a member of the JBMTI theory-building group advancing the practice of the Relational-Cultural Theory, which is a new model of psychological development. In addition, Linda coordinates and contributes to training programs, publications, and special projects for the JBMTI. She holds a doctoral degree in clinical/community psychology and has published papers on resilience, substance abuse prevention, shame and humiliation, relational practice in the workplace, and Relational-Cultural Theory. [read more]
Please see:
• Humiliation: Real Pain, A Pathway to Violence, the draft of Linda's paper for Round Table 2 of our 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City.
Humiliation: Assessing the Impact of Derision, Degradation, and Debasement, first published in The Journal of Primary Prevention, 19(4): 259-278, co-authored with T. Luchetta, 1999.
• Shame and Humiliation: From Isolation to Relational Transformation, the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMIT), Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College No. 88, Wellesley, MA 02481, co-authored with Wendy Rosen, Maureen Walker, Judith V. Jordan, 2000.
• Humiliation and Assistance: Telling the Truth About Power, Telling a New Story, paper prepared for the 5th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies 'Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People', in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.
•  Our Appreciative Frame, created on 12th August 2012 for our 2012 Norway Conference
•  Our Open Space Dignilogue Format, created on August 12, 2012 for our 2012 Norway Conference
•  Our Appreciative Frame, created in December 2014 for our 2014 New York Workshop (Pdf)
•  Appreciative Enquiry 4, a video that was recorded on May 27, 2015, in Portland, Oregon, USA, by Linda Hartling, for the 25th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, in Kigali, Rwanda, June 2 – 5, 2015.
•  Appreciative Frame shared on December 8, 2016, at the 2016 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, in New York City, December 8 – 9, 2016.
•  Dignilogue Tips and Dynamic Dignilogue List, created by Linda Hartling on October 10, 2015, for the 2015 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, in New York City, December 3 – 4, 2015.
Mini-Documentary of the Annual Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict "The Globalization of Dignity," December 8 - 9, 2016

Evelin Gerda Lindner, Medical Doctor, Clinical and Social Psychologist, Ph.D. (Dr. med.), Ph.D. (Dr. psychol.), organizer of the HumanDHS conferences, in supporting of the local conveners

Evelin Gerda Lindner is the Founding President of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network and initiator of the World Dignity University initiative. She is a transdisciplinary social scientist and humanist who holds two Ph.D.s, one in medicine and one in psychology. In 1996, she designed a research project on the concept of humiliation and its role in genocide and war. German history served as starting point. She is the recipient of the 2006 SBAP Award, the 2009 "Prisoner’s Testament" Peace Award, the 2014 HumanDHS Lifetime Award, and she has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2015, 2016, and 2017. She is affiliated with the Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN), which was superseded, in 2009, by the Advanced Consortium on Cooperation, Conflict, and Complexity (AC4), at Columbia University, New York City. She is also affiliated with the University of Oslo, Norway, with its Norwegian Centre for Human Rights, and with its Department of Psychology (folk.uio.no/evelinl/), and, furthermore, with the Maison des Sciences de l'Homme in Paris. Lindner is teaching globally, including in South East Asia, the Middle East, Australia, Africa, and other places globally. [read more]
Please see:
Interview with Evelin Lindner - Challenges of our Time; Learning to Connect, December 8, 2016
Mini-Documentary of the Annual Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict "The Globalization of Dignity," December 8 - 9, 2016

 


 

Participants in all NY workshops so far

 


Papers

All participants are warmly invited to send in full papers after the woirkshop.
Please notify us, if you wish to submit any of your papers also as a book chapter or as a journal article in our Journal of HumanDignity and Humiliation Studies.

Please see earlier submitted papers here:
• List of all Publications
• Papers, Abstracts, and Notes for the 2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict
• Papers, Abstracts, and Notes for the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict
• Papers, Abstracts, and Notes for the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict
• Papers, Abstracts, and Notes for the 2007 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict
• Papers, Abstracts, and Notes for the 2008 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict
• Papers, Abstracts, and Notes for the 2009 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict
• Papers, Abstracts, and Notes for the 2010 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
• Papers, Abstracts, and Notes for the 2011 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
• Papers, Abstracts, and Notes for the 2012 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
• Papers, Abstracts, and Notes for the 2013 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
• Papers, Abstracts, and Notes for the 2014 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
• Papers, Abstracts, and Notes for the 2015 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
• Papers, Abstracts, and Notes for the 2016 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
• Papers, Abstracts, and Notes for the 2017 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict

 

Abstracts/Notes/Papers of 2018

Please see further down the papers/notes that participants send in prior to the workshop so that everybody can get acquainted with all others beforehand.

See here the work by:
Andrea Bartoli
Linda M. Hartling
Donald C. Klein

Victoria C. Fontan

Evelin G. Lindner

Monty Marshall (2019)
Conflict and Governance in the Light of Dignity and Humiliation (2019) (Video)
Contribution shared at the 2019 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 5–6, 2019.

Claudia E. Cohen (2019)
Humiliation, Honoring Dignity and Destructive Conflict: You’ve Got to be Carefully Taught
Contribution shared at the 2019 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 5–6, 2019.

Stephen G. Post (2019)
God and Love on Route 80: The Hidden Mystery of Human Connectedness (2019) (Pdf | Video)
Contribution shared at the 2019 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 5–6, 2019.
See his book God and Love on Route 80: The Hidden Mystery of Human Connectedness (Coral Gables, FL: Mango, 2019)

David C. Yamada (2019)
Launching a Law and Psychology Lab (Pdf | Video)
Contribution shared at the 2019 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 5-6, 2019.

Michael Greene (2019)
A Human Rights Perspective on Preventing Violence
Contribution shared at the 2019 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 5–6, 2019.

Mechthild "Mecke" Nagel (2019)
Dignity Dialogue – Entering the Circles of Hope
Contribution shared at the 2019 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 5 – 6, 2019.

Tony Gaskew (2019)
Life Support: Ritual, Community, and Healing Through the Eyes of a Juvenile Lifer (Pdf | Video)
Contribution shared at the 2019 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 5 – 6, 2019.

Chipamong Chowdhury (Banthe Revata) (2019)
The Eco-Monks, Forest Dignity and Reforestation in Buddhist Asia (Pdf | Video)
Contribution shared at the 2019 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 5 – 6, 2019.

Lucien Lombardo (2019)
Adults ‘Becoming Better Ancestors’ through Exploring Their Childhood Experiences with Human Dignity (Pdf | Video)
Contribution shared at the 2019 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 5 – 6, 2019.

Fonkem Achankeng I (2019)
Humiliation, Betrayal and Great Pain: British Southern Cameroons, Half a Century of Self-Questioning, and a Mass Movement for Freedom
Contribution shared at the 2019 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 5 – 6, 2019.

Michael L. Perlin and Heather Cucolo (2019)
How to Provide Dignity for Persons with Autism in the Criminal Justice Process (Pdf | Video)
Contribution shared at the 2019 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 5 – 6, 2019.

Bonnie Selterman (2019)
Notes on Human Dignity as a Concept That Can Be Taught
Reflections prepared in May 2019 for the 2019 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 5 – 6, 2019.

 

 

Ideas for Dignilogue Topics

Your input is very welcome!

Ani Kalayjian kindly wrote (July 9, 2009):
Can we have a special section at the December Conference for highlighting both of these volumes, as well as the forgiveness book which will be in print on Aug 4th right at the APA Convention in Toronto. We could get some of the authors of the forgiveness book on a panel addressing: Slavery, denial, US prisoners, Sudan Genocide (these authors are living in this geographic area). We can also do the same another panel on the II volumes that you contributed in focusing on rituals to transform humiliation into empowerment.

Karen Murphy kindly wrote (November 25, 2009):
I was thinking that CBS’ 60 Minutes Investigation of Congo’s Conflict Minerals on November 29, 2009 (see Enough's new Conflict Minerals web portal), would be a very interesting opportunity/resource for a roundtable, evening event, that is, using the 60 Minutes episode to raise awareness and to provide a context for discussion about the ways that we can make a difference in our daily lives to improve (even, in this case, save) the lives of others. Wishing you well and very grateful for you and your work--Karen
60 Minutes Episode on Conflict Minerals
If you have a cell phone in your pocket or a gold ring on your finger, you are directly linked to the deadliest war in the world. How is that possible? For over a century, the Democratic Republic of the Congo has been plagued by regional conflict and a deadly scramble for its vast natural resources. The conflict in eastern Congo today – the deadliest since World War II – is fueled in significant part by a multi-million dollar trade in minerals. Armed groups generate an estimated $180 million each year by trading four main minerals: the ores that produce the metals tin, tantalum, tungsten, and gold. This money enables the armed groups to purchase large numbers of weapons and continue their campaign of rape and brutal violence against civilians, with some of the worst abuses occurring in mining areas. After passing through traders, smelters, and component manufacturers, these materials are placed in jewelry and electronic devices, such as cell phones, portable music players, and computers, and sold in the United States. See also www.enoughproject.org/conflict-minerals.

Karen Murphy kindly wrote (January 28, 2009):
I am writing with an idea for the conference.
Have you had the chance to read Samantha Power's book Chasing the Flame? It's about Sergio Vieira de Mello and his work in various countries emerging from mass violence. Based on his life's work, Power proposes several key principles. One of them is dignity.
The book is the first product in a campaign that focuses on foreign policy. There is also a documentary (premiering this month at Sundance film festival) and a feature film by Terry George. In addition, there is a website that explores the key issues, www.chasingtheflame.org, and www.chasingtheflame.org/2008/08/the-principle-o.html (for an example of one of my blogs).
I was thinking that it would be so interesting to loop your work into this campaign. Perhaps members of the conference could read the book and then discuss it at a roundtable. You could then post blogs on the site or write in other forums.
It would be so interesting to bring your research into this conversation on foreign policy, nation building, national reconstruction and reconciliation, etc. As you might know, Samantha Power has played and continues to play a key role in Obama's foreign policy – looping your work into the website would be a way to bring it to a wider audience and a way to help shape this emerging conversation.
January 29, 2009:
I'm sure we can get copies of the book at a discounted price for conference attendees – and I'd love to think about how you might take the foreign policy lens and apply your scholarship – and perhaps then post as blogs for www.chasingtheflame.org, thus broadening their audience and yours. Best, Karen

Floyd Webster Rudmin:
"Asymmetries in self-perceptions of being the humiliatee versus the humiliator"
"Archetypal humiliation in literature: A survey of English literature teachers"

Annette Anderson-Engler:
"Constructing Narratives after Violent Conflict"
Annette kindly wrote on March 31, 2006: "I would like to discuss how individuals construct their narratives after traumatic experiences or event."

Dharm P. S. Bhawuk:
"Theory, Method, and Practice of Humiliation Research"
This could also be a topic for our Open Space

Ana Ljubinkovic:
"Assistance and Humiliation"

Varda Mühlbauer:
"Humiliation/Dignity in the Workplace"
"Humiliation/Dignity in the Family"

Zahid Shahab Ahmed:
"Humiliation and Child Sexual Abuse"

Victoria C. Fontan:
"Terrorism and Humiliation" and
"Armed Conflict, Escalation and Humiliation"

Miriam Marton:
"Consequences of Humiliation"

Jörg Calliess:
"How to Prepare 'Non-Psychologists' (Human Rights Defenders, Peace Keepers, etc.) for Dealing with the Trauma of Humiliation in Victims"

Emmanuel Ndahimana:
"Ignorance and Humiliation"

Arie Nadler:
"Justice and Humiliation"

Alicia Cabezudo:
"Interlinking Peace Education and Humiliation Studies: A Bridge for Crossing Borders"

 


 

Material

•  Mission LifeForce – Law Is Upside Down, Mission LifeForce, November 7, 2017, #MissionLifeForce - right now, dangerous industrial activity is legally permitted, while resisting it is criminalised. But we can change this. Go to https://missionlifeforce.org to become a legal trustee of the Earth and help fund a law to protect our planet, our communities, and all those who take action as conscientious protectors.

•  Presenting Your Earth Protectors Defence in Court, Mission LifeForce, November 7, 2017, Key information for conscientious protectors – activists who are trustees of the Earth Protectors Trust Fund and wishing to use the document in a court of law. Go to https://missionlifeforce.org for more information on how to become a legal trustee of the Earth and help fund a law to protect our planet, our communities, and all those who take action as conscientious protectors. #conscientiousprotectors #earthprotectors

•  "Conflict in the Workplace," ACResolution Magazine, Summer 2014.

•  Dutton, Jane E., Kristina M. Workman, and Ashley E. Hardin (2014). "Compassion at work." Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior, 1 (1), pp. 277–304, doi:10.1146/annurev-orgpsych-031413-91221.

•  "Mass Nervous Breakdown: Millions of Americans on the Brink As Stress Pandemic Ravages Society," by Gabriela Segura, M.D., Sott.net: Signs of the Times, April 22, 2013: "Fully one-third of U.S. employees suffer chronic debilitating stress, and more than half of all "millennials" (18 to 33 year olds) experience a level of stress that keeps them awake at night, including large numbers diagnosed with depression or anxiety disorder."