Evelin Lindner's Teaching

We appreciate that you contact Evelin Lindner if you wish to quote her. Texts may usually be copied for non-profit educational use if proper credit is given to the author and Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies. No part of these files may be transmitted, distributed or reproduced in any other way without permission from the author.

See further down some selected examples of Evelin Lindner's teaching (please see a full list of her lectures and media appearances on the Database of University of Oslo, Norway, Cristin). See also Evelin Lindner's videos.

Video-taped introductory lectures on Dignity or Humiliation (2 hours)
These lectures were hosted since 2002 by the Department of Psychology at the University of Oslo, Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3, until 2014 as part of PSYC3203 – Anvendt sosialpsykologi, from 2015 onward as guest lecture in Kultur- og sammfunnspsykologi / Cultural and Community Psychology. See the video site of the Faculty of Social Science and search for "Lindner." Thank you, dear Lasse Moer, for your untiring support!

2nd March 2017: Post-Conflict Reconstruction and Reconciliation: The Case of Rwanda
3rd March 2016: From Humiliation, Vengeance, and Genocide to Reconciliation: Experiences from Rwanda
11th February 2015: Hva har kultur- og samfunnspsykologi med verdighet å gjøre? (Diskusjon / discussion)
22nd January 2014: Verdighet eller ydmykelse?
23rd January 2013: Dignity and Humiliation: Norway and the Concept of likeverd
25th January 2012: Humiliation and Terrorism
12th January 2011: Dignity or Humiliation: The World at a Crossroad
13th January 2010: Dignity or Humiliation: The World at a Crossroad
14th January 2009: Dignity or Humiliation: The World at a Crossroad
– 30th September 2008: Dignity or Humiliation: The World at a Crossroad
– 2004, 2005, 2006: Ydmykelse og konflikt: Forelesning i Anvendt psykologi for fjerde semester Sosialpsykologi, Profesjonsstudiet, ved Reidar Ommundsen, Universitetet i Oslo, Psykologisk institutt / Lecture in Applied Psychology for 4th Semester Social Psychology, University of Oslo, Department of Psychology.
- 14th October 2003: Humiliation and Conflict

Ydmykelse - følelsens atombombe
Evelin Lindner og Bernt Hagtvet ble intervjuet av Aase Cathrine Myrtveit for NRK (Norsk rikskringkasting / Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation) Radio P2, Verdibørsen, opptak 24. mars 2017, sendt 28. mars 2017.

Åpent temamøte: Om ydmykelse
22nd March, 19.00 – 21.00, Litteraturhuset, Wergelandsveien 29, 0167 Oslo, invitert av Human-Etisk Forbund, Oslo fylkeslag. Se invitasjon.

Honor, Humiliation and Terror
Monday lunch / Mandagslunsj with Evelin Lindner, introduction / åpningsinnlegg Inga Bostad, Norwegian Centre for Human Rights / Norsk senter for menneskerettigheter, University of Oslo, Cort Adelers gate 30, 0162 Oslo, Norway, Seminarrom Asbjørn Eide, 13th March 2016, 12:00 – 13:00, see announcement. Thank you, dear Zuzana Luckay, for coming all the way from Slovakia to be with us, and for doing the video recording!
• Evelin Lindner has researched the theme of humiliation, or what she calls "the nuclear bomb of the emotions," for 40 years. She is a physician and psychologist and one of our foremost experts in the field. From genocide to polarized societies to family feuds, they often have their roots in the same dynamics of humiliation. How many of the world problems can be explained by humiliation? What happens when people feel humiliated or trampled on?
This talk is based on Evelin Lindner's upcoming book Honor, Humiliation, and Terror.

Post-Conflict Reconstruction and Reconciliation: The Case of Rwanda (see also a short video clip by Esben Østbye)
Lecture at the Department of Psychology, Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3, Oslo, Norway, auditorium 2. It is a privilege to be part of PSY4506 – Human Rights, Democracy and Reconstruction after Conflict; A community based approach, by Nora Sveaass and Inger Skjelsbæk, 2nd March 2017, 12.15-14.00, Tel. +47 22845000. See the announcement of the talk. This lecture is also part of an annual series hosted by the Department of Psychology at the University of Oslo, Norway (until 2014 in the context of PSYC3203 – Anvendt sosialpsykologi, in 2015 as guest lecture; see the video site of the Faculty of Social Science at the University of Oslo). In June 2015, the 25th Annual Dignity Conference took place in Kigali, Rwanda.
• In this talk, Evelin Lindner reports from her personal experience. The background is the 25th Annual Dignity Conference that took place in Kigali, Rwanda's capital, in June 2015, and the 29th Annual Dignity Conference that took place in Dubrovnik, Croatia, in September 2016.
Lindner embeds the case of Rwanda into a larger context that is relevant for all world regions. (Correction: clearly, one free-rider alone does not cause the commons to collapse, on the contrary, this is precisely what can be successfully contained, see Elinor Ostrom.) Mutually dignifying dialogue is the path to the human rights ideal that "every human being is born equal in dignity and rights." However, in an atmosphere of fear, traditional power-over strategies that seemed long forgotten tend to re-surface even in the most peace-minded social contexts. Traditional authoritarian strategies for securing power and stability may emerge when people face adversity, and complex psychological dynamics of humiliation may be set in motion. Lindner calls for a global citizens movement that takes its inspiration from the Norwegian cultural heritage of likeverd, dugnad, and global solidarity (Nansenpasset)
In more detail: Since 2003, Rwanda has enacted a number of laws prohibiting “genocide ideology”, “genocide minimisation” and “negationism.” The National Commission for the Fight against Genocide (CNLG) was founded in 2007. Charges of terrorism and threats to national security have been brought against a number of people.
In March 2015, the 25th Annual Dignity Conference was in danger of not taking place. The reason was that Lindner's dissertation seemingly was misinterpreted as condoning genocide as an understandable and thus legitimate outcome of humiliation. Clearly, the actual message of Lindner's dissertation – indeed, of her entire work – is the stark opposite: since humiliation may lead to violence, and to avoid this outcome, humiliation must be better understood. Therefore, understanding is NOT to be confounded with condoning. Cycles of violence only humiliate all involved, including its perpetrators. Cycles of violence do not heal humiliation. Lindner was able to clarify this misunderstanding and the conference became a great success.
In her talk, Lindner embeds the case of Rwanda into a larger context, namely, the cross-pressure between traditional strategies for securing power and stability through domination, and efforts to manifest the ideal that "every human being is born equal in dignity and rights." She highlights the commons dilemma and the security dilemma as particularly powerful hurdles on the way to equality in dignity for all. When People face adversity, compelling psychological dynamics are set in motion, and these dynamics are not restricted to far-flung places like Rwanda or Southeast Europe. In an atmosphere of fear, traditional power-over strategies that seemed long forgotten tend to re-surface even in the most peace-minded social contexts.

Mini-Documentary of the Annual Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict "The Globalization of Dignity," December 8 - 9, 2016
The 13th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict took place at Columbia University in New York City, December 8 - 9, 2016. The entire HumanDHS network very much thanks Mariana Ferraz for making this wonderful mini-documentary! Thank you, dear Mariana, and also you, dear Gaby Saab, for inviting so many of us into this documentary, from Janet Gerson to David Yamada, Michael Perlin, Philip Brown, Kebadu Mekonnen Gebremariam, David Yau-Fai Ho! Thank you for the song "A Wonderful World" in the background, the very song that David Yamada brought to us! Linda Hartling is the Director of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network. Evelin Lindner is the founding president of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies network.

Interview with Evelin Lindner - Challenges of our Time; Learning to Connect, December 8, 2016
The 13th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict took place at Columbia University in New York City, December 8 - 9, 2016. We very much thank Mariana Ferraz for making this interview! Thank you, dear Mariana, and also you, dear Gaby Saab, for inviting so many of us into wonderful interviews!

Evelin Lindner Shares the Story of the Jewelry from the Oasis Siwa, December 9, 2016
Evelin Lindner shares the story of the jewelry from the oasis Siwa on the afternoon of December 9, 2016, at the 13th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, which took place at Columbia University in New York City, December 8 – 9, 2016. We very much thank Mariana Ferraz for doing the video-taping! Correction: Please note that Evelin was a medical student in Bangkok in 1981 (not in 1998)!

Linda Hartling and Evelin Lindner in Dignilogue on "The Globalization of Dignity" (Video | Questions Prepared by Linda)
Evelin Lindner and Linda Hartling contributed in the morning on December 8, 2016, to the 13th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, which took place at Columbia University in New York City, December 8 – 9, 2016. Linda Hartling is the Director of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network. Evelin Lindner is the founding president of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies network. We very much thank Mariana Ferraz for the video-taping! Please be aware that this is an unedited video.

Book launch: Honor, Humiliation, and Terror
Columbia University, Teachers College, Gottesman Libraries, room Russell 306, on December 7, 2016, 12.00 – 2pm. See the invitation, the invitation flyer, and the event in the Gottesman Libraries Calendar. Thank you, dear Talia Shafir for doing such nice video recording! Please be aware that this is an unedited video.

From Systemic Humiliation to Systemic Dignity (see the Powerpoint presentation)
Presentation shared on 26th September at the 5th Biennial Meeting of the Knowledge Federation, titled 'Tools and Practices for the Collective Mind Revolution', conference held at the Inter-University Centre Dubrovnik, 25th September – 1st October, 2016.

Cities at Risk – From Humiliation to Dignity
See also the long version of a paper written in Sarajevo in August 2016 and Dubrovnik in September 2016, for the 27th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Dubrovnik, Croatia, 19th September – 23rd September 2016, and for the Journal of Urban Culture Research, to be published in 2017. See the abstract written with Kjell Skyllstad prior to the conference in 2015, the video of Evelin Lindner's keynote address at the conference in Dubrovnik on 22nd September 2016, and the Powerpoint presentation of 26th September 2016.
• Abstract: Warnings are out that in the next twenty years population growth and fast-paced urbanization will lead to widespread social disconnection. Unless there is a dramatic change in how economies are run, demand for natural resources will rise and lead to rising prices as a result of growing competition for access to natural resources. Among the “winners” will be the conflict entrepreneurs, the gang leaders, the under-bosses, who will recruit their foot soldiers among disaffected young men. In the worst-case, the world, including its cities, could turn into many small-scale off-limits war zones. Ecocide will combine with sociocide.
If we follow the African adage that “it needs a village to raise a child,” then the number of disaffected children and youth in the global village will rise. They will be vulnerable to follow humiliation-entrepreneurs who will further weaken and ravage this village. The majority of people will be caught in between.
How can such a future of systemic humiliation be avoided? How can a future of dignity be created instead? This article calls for the “global street” to rise up and humanize globalization. We can co-create a world of equal dignity for all – in short egalization – thus achieving globegalization instead of globalization void of dignity. Many past “isms” have brought tremendous suffering to the world. They descended into violent cycles of humiliation rather than enlightenment. How could a future-orientated “ism” be described? What about dignity + ism, or dignism? Dignism describes a world,
– where every newborn finds space and is nurtured to unfold their highest and best qualities, embedded in a social context of loving appreciation and connection,
– where the carrying capacity of the planet guides the ways in which everybody’s basic needs are met,
– where we are united in respecting human dignity and celebrating diversity, where we prevent unity from being perverted into oppressive uniformity, and keep diversity from sliding into hostile divisions.

A World at Risk: From Humiliation to Dignity (see the Powerpoint presentation of 26th September)
The 27th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies took place in Dubrovnik, Croatia, from 19th September – 23rd September 2016. This is Evelin Lindner's keynote address on 19th September 2016.

Deep Dao Dialogue: Dignilogue with Evelin Lindner in the Arne Næss Chair (see the invitation as Pdf, and on Facebook)
Norsk Taiji Senter / Norwegian Taiji Centre, Kirkegata 1-3, 0153 Oslo, Norway, 11th March 2016, 19.00, kindly invited by director Pamela Hiley. Thanks a lot to Pamela Hiley for taking lovely photos and to Allan Hiley for doing the video recording!

The Story of the Siwa Jewellery
A little introduction to the Deep Dao Dialogue: Dignilogue with Evelin Lindner in the Arne Næss Chair (see the invitation as Pdf, and on Facebook), at the Norsk Taiji Senter (Norwegian Taiji Centre), director Pamela Hiley, Kirkegata 1-3, 0153 Oslo, Norway, 11th March 2016, 19.00. Thanks a lot to Allan Hiley for doing the video recording! See photos.

From Humiliation, Vengeance, and Genocide to Reconciliation: Experiences from Rwanda
Monday lunch / Mandagslunsj with Evelin Lindner, introduction / åpningsinnlegg Inga Bostad, University of Oslo, Norwegian Centre for Human Rights / Norsk senter for menneskerettigheter, Cort Adelers gate 30, 0162 Oslo, Norway, Seminarrom Asbjørn Eide, 7th March 2016, 12:00 – 13:00, see announcement. Thanks to Heidetraut von Weltzien Høivik for taking lovely photos, and to Ann Kristin Ulrichsen for doing the video recording.
• In this talk, Lindner reports from her personal experience of the psychological dynamics of the cross-pressure that arises between traditional strategies of securing power by domination and efforts to manifest the ideal that "every human being is born equal in dignity and rights." The commons dilemma and the security dilemma are powerful frames for the transition to this ideal, and success or failure is not a question of abstract game theory. Compelling psychological dynamics are involved that every person experiences – or every community or nation, for that matter – when facing adversity. And this dynamic is not restricted to far-flung places like Rwanda. In an atmosphere of fear, traditional power-over strategies that seemed long forgotten tend to re-surface even in the most peace-minded social contexts.
The background for this talk is the 25th Annual Dignity Conference that took place in Kigali, Rwanda's capital, in June 2015. Evelin Lindner's doctoral dissertation was titled The Psychology of Humiliation: Somalia, Rwanda / Burundi, and Hitler's Germany (UiO, 2000). Since 2003, Rwanda has enacted a number of laws prohibiting “genocide ideology”, “genocide minimisation” and “negationism.” The National Commission for the Fight against Genocide (CNLG) was founded in 2007. Charges of terrorism and threats to national security have been brought against those indicted. In March 2015, the 25th Annual Dignity Conference was in danger of not taking place. The reason was that Lindner's dissertation apparently was misinterpreted as condoning genocide as an understandable and thus legitimate outcome of humiliation. Clearly, the actual message of Lindner's dissertation – indeed, of her entire work – is the stark opposite: her stance is that, since humiliation may lead to violence, and in order to avoid this outcome, humiliation must be better understood, and in this context, understanding is NOT to be confounded with condoning. There is no automatism in humiliation necessarily leading to violence, and, furthermore, rather than healing humiliation, cycles of violence only humiliate all involved, including its perpetrators.

From Humiliation, Vengeance, and Genocide to Reconciliation: Experiences from Rwanda
Lecture at the Department of Psychology, Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3, Oslo, Norway, auditorium 3, as part of PSY4506 – Human Rights, Democracy and Reconstruction after Conflict; A community based approach, with Nora Sveaass and Inger Skjelsbæk, 3rd March 2016, 12.15-14.00, Tel. +47 22845000. This lecture is also part of an annual series hosted by the Department of Psychology at the University of Oslo, Norway (until 2014 in the context of PSYC3203 – Anvendt sosialpsykologi, in 2015 as guest lecture; see the video site of the Faculty of Social Science at the University of Oslo). In June 2015, the 25th Annual Dignity Conference took place in Kigali, Rwanda.
• Beskrivelse: Evelin Lindner earned her doctorate from the Department of Psychology at the University in Oslo in 2001, on the topic of The Psychology of Humiliation: Somalia, Rwanda / Burundi, and Hitler's Germany. In this talk, she reports on the dramatic experiences she went through when she was back in Rwanda to conduct the 25th Annual Dignity Conference of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies network in Kigali in June 2015. Since 2003, Rwanda has enacted a number of laws prohibiting “genocide ideology”, “genocide minimisation” and “negationism.” The National Commission for the Fight against Genocide (CNLG) was founded in 2007. Charges of terrorism and threats to national security have been brought against those indicted. In March 2015, it seemed that the Dignity Conference could not happen. The reason was that Lindner's doctoral dissertation, seemingly, was misinterpreted as condoning genocide as an understandable and thus legitimate outcome of humiliation. Clearly, the actual message of Lindner's dissertation – indeed, of her entire work – is the stark opposite: since humiliation may lead to violence, in order to avoid this outcome, humiliation must be better understood, and in this context, understanding is NOT to be confounded with condoning. There is no automatism in humiliation necessarily leading to violence, and, furthermore, rather than healing humiliation, cycles of violence only humiliate all involved, including its perpetrators.
Lindner reports from her personal experience of the psychological dynamics of the cross-pressure that arises between traditional strategies of securing power by domination and efforts to manifest the ideal that "every human being is born equal in dignity and rights." The commons dilemma and the security dilemma are powerful frames for the transition to this ideal, and success or failure is not a question of abstract game theory. Compelling psychological dynamics are involved that every person experiences – or every community or nation, for that matter – when facing adversity. And this dynamic is not restricted to far-flung places like Rwanda. In an atmosphere of fear, traditional power-over strategies that seemed long forgotten tend to re-surface even in the most peace-minded social contexts.

Linda Hartling and Evelin Lindner in Dignilogue on the 2015 Nobel Peace Prize Nomination of Our Dignity Work, December 3, 2015 (Link to Nobel Peace Prize nomination page | Video | Powerpoint | see also Pdf 2014)
Evelin Lindner and Linda Hartling contributed to the Public Event on the afternoon of December 3, 2015, at the 12th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, which took place at Columbia University in New York City, December 3 – 4, 2013. Linda Hartling is the Director of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network. Evelin Lindner is the founding president of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies network and she explains the background of, and the intentions behind the Nobel Peace Prize. See also her reflections on her 2015 nomination, and meet the inspirer of the prize, Bertha von Suttner. We very much thank Gabriela Saab for the video-taping!

A Global Dignilogue with Linda Hartling and Evelin Lindner, Honoring the Message of Alfred Nobel and Bertha von Suttner, December 3, 2015 (Link to Nobel Peace Prize nomination page | Video | Powerpoint | see also Pdf 2014)
Linda Hartling and Evelin Lindner engaged in a Dignilogue (Dignity + Dialogue), on the morning of December 3, 2015, at the 12th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, which took place at Columbia University in New York City, December 3 – 4, 2015. Linda Hartling is the Director of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network. Evelin Lindner is the founding president of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies network and she explains the background of, and the intentions behind the Nobel Peace Prize. See also her reflections on her 2015 nomination, and meet the inspirer of the prize, Bertha von Suttner. We very much thank Gabriela Saab for the video-taping!

Von Demütigung zu Terror und Krieg: Erniedrigung kann zu Gewalt führen, kann sie auch zu Liebe führen? 11. Oktober 2015,
2015 Symposium "Gehirne zwischen Liebe und Krieg – Menschlichkeit in Zeiten der Neurowissenschaften", gemeinnützige Turm der Sinne / Tower of the Senses GmbH, Nürnberg, Germany. Siehe auch turmdersinne's blog, Evelin's bio, und Tanja Toplak-Páll mit Evelin Lindner, Für einen Weg ohne Rache und Gewalt, Interview in Nürnberger Nachrichten, 24. September 2015.
See also the chapter Auswirkungen von Demütigung auf Menschen und Völker, in Gehirne zwischen Liebe und Krieg: Menschlichkeit im Zeitalter der Neurowissenschaften, edited by Helmut Fink, and Rainer Rosenzweig, Kapitel 3, pp. 41–73. Münster: mentis. ISBN 978-3-95743-069-4 (Print).
• Zusammenfassung: Psychischer Schmerz wird im Gehirn wie physischer Schmerz verarbeitet und das Erleben anderer kann wie eigenes Erleben erfahren werden kann. Wenn andere Menschen Demütigung, Erniedrigung und Kränkung erleiden, auch wenn es geographisch weit entfernt ist, kann es wie eigene Verletzung gefühlt werden. Seit Medien und Internet das Leiden anderer immer näher bringen, wird dieses Phänomen verstärkt. Gefühle von Demütigung können zu Apathie und Depression, aber auch zu Hilfsbereitschaft und Gewaltbereitschaft führen. Nicht nur Deutschlands Geschichte, dass mit Hilfe von kollektiven Demütigungsnarrativen die Enttäuschungen Einzelner so gebündelt werden kann, dass ganze Völker in den Krieg und das Begehen von Völkermord und Terror geführt werden können. Auch die Einrichtung systemischer Demütigung kann als "Rettung" empfunden In diesem Kontext kann die Antwort mit systemischer Demütigung als "Rettung" empfunden werden – Apartheid, wie sie von einem Professor der Psychologie konzipiert wurde, ist ein Beispiel. Gefühle der Demütigung entstehen unter anderem, wenn Versprechen von Respekt nicht eingehalten werden. Menschenrechtsideale der gleichen Menschenwürde für alle, zum Beispiel, repräsentieren ein solches Versprechen, und leere Menschenrechtsrhetorik und doppelte Standards wirken doppelt kränkend. Wenn die daraus entstehenden Reaktionen fehlinterpretiert werden und zu kontraproduktiven Gegenmitteln gegriffen wird, kann es zu unnötigen Kreisläufen der gegenseitigen Demütigung führen. Bewusstseinsbildung im Sinne eines Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Paulo Freire oder Nelson Mandela kann helfen, von einer Kultur des Krieges, in der Demütigung anderer als Lösung gesehen wird, zu einer Kultur der globalen Einigkeit zu gelangen, in der kulturelle und ökologische Vielfalt im Kontext gleicher Menschenwürde für alle gedeihen kann. Wissenschaftler, die die Einsicht und Demut besitzen, sich ihrer gesellschaftlichen Abhängigkeit und Verantwortung bewusst zu sein, können dabei helfen.
Dr. Dr. Evelin Lindner ist promovierte Medizinerin und Psychologin. Sie ist Mitbegründerin der World Dignity University Initiative und mit der Uni Oslo, der Columbia University in New York und dem Maison des Sciences de l‘Homme in Paris assoziiert. Als Gründungspräsidentin von Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, einem weltweiten transdisziplinären Netzwerk von Wissenschaftlern und Praktikern, ist sie für den Friedensnobelpreis 2015 nominiert.

Regaining Dignity: A Dignity Renaissance
Presentation prepared for the 4th June, 2015, at the 25th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, which took place in Kigali, Rwanda, 2nd – 5th June 2015, given in Kigali on 30th June 2015, see the PowerPoint video created on 30th June.

Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
Monday lunch / Mandagslunsj with Evelin Lindner, introduction / åpningsinnlegg Inga Bostad, University of Oslo, Norwegian Centre for Human Rights / Norsk senter for menneskerettigheter, Cort Adelers gate 30, 0162 Oslo, Norway, Seminarrom Asbjørn Eide, 16th February 2015, 12:00 – 13:00, see announcement. Warm thanks go to Rachel Aspögård for video-taping the talk.
• Description: Conflict has many facets. Conflict can be misunderstood, misrecognised, or instrumentalised for ulterior goals. One way to maintain power, for instance, is to divert attention through the creation of pseudo-conflicts so as to keep underlying conflicts about power invisible. Conflict can elicit angry confrontation, and even cycles of humiliation can be triggered, where humiliation is involved both as act and as feeling, as tool and as outcome. Moreover, protracted cycles of humiliation can lead to paralysis and apathy, results from 'learned helplessness'. The most desirable scenario is to replace unforgiving confrontation with mutually enriching diversity so that unity in diversity can flourish instead of division without unity.
The latter approach can be learned, even though it requires considerable intentional effort to envision, embark on, and experiment with dignifying communication styles that connect in dialogue instead of keeping monologues apart. Yet, history shows that it is worth it. Once established, a culture of unity in diversity can reduce the risk that important conflicts will be overlooked and it can widen the space for a constructive 'pedagogy of conflict'. Throughout history, cultural heydays were characterised by diversity, from the Shiraz of poet Hafez' in Persia to the Moorish Kingdom of Granada. Respect for the equality in dignity of all involved is at the core of such unity in diversity, which means abstaining from inflicting humiliation and acknowledging the seriousness of feelings of humiliation so as to prevent and heal these feelings as quickly as possible. So far, such cultural blossoming remains rare in human history and also most present-day cultural contexts fail to socialise their citizens into the values and skills necessary to achieve it.
In times of crisis, it is particularly hazardous to neglect necessary conflicts and to cover up real conflicts with specious conflicts, as much as it is dangerous to allow conflict to feed cycles of humiliation. Necessary conflicts need to be addressed rather than neglected, and this has to be done in dignified and dignifying ways. At the current point in history, there is a danger of overlooking the long-term and global dimensions of human existence on planet Earth. When politicians are beholden to pressures from global systemic frameworks, and when even academia is pushed to give up its ideals in favour of economic considerations, and when this is part and parcel of an increase in social inequality and ecological degradation worldwide, a coordinated effort by a world citizens movement is needed.
Norway has a cultural heritage of unity (dugnad) and equality in dignity (likeverd), as well as a history of global outreach. This heritage can be regarded as an important resource, entailing the responsibility – informed by humility – to inspire global concerted conscientisation (Paulo Freire's term) by each individual world citizen. The aim would be to utilize all dignifying aspects of humanity's cultural heritage to unite in concerted stewardship of cultural and biological diversity and substance, and to give space to the human rights tenet that every human being is born free and equal in dignity and rights, while protecting and replenishing the Earth's limited natural resources.

Hva har kultur- og samfunnspsykologi med verdighet å gjøre?
Gjesteforelesning / guest lecture, Psykologisk institutt / Department of Psychology, Universitetet i Oslo, Norway, Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3A, 0373 Oslo, Norge, auditorium 1, 11. februar 2015, 13.15-15.00. Warm thanks go to Per Ole Bjørnstad for video-taping.
This lecture is part of an annual series hosted by the Department of Psychology at the University of Oslo, Norway (until 2014 as part of PSYC3203 – Anvendt sosialpsykologi, from 2015 onward as guest lecture; see the video site of the Faculty of Social Science at the University of Oslo).
• Beskrivelse: Hvilken rolle spiller psykologer og psykologi i samfunnet? Hvem er ansvarlig når psykologi blir misforstått eller misbrukt? Er psykologisk forskning verdinøytral? Psykologisk teori og praksis kan ha ulik effekt. Evelin Lindner bruker forskningen på hjelpeløshet (learned helplessness), motstandsdyktighet (resilience), selvfølelse (self-esteem) og lykke (happiness) som eksempler. Økonomisk nytenkning, for eksempel, ble befruktet av spørsmål om «Brutto Nasjonal Produkt» ikke er et for snevert instrument for å styre samfunnspolitikk og konsepter som «Gross National Happiness» ble formulert. På den andre siden har psykologisk teori og praksis «privatisert» lidelse til en grad at dette risikerer å undergrave menneskers evne til å posisjonere seg som subjekt heller enn objekt innenfor de bredere linjene av felles historie -- i dagens verden ville Nelson Mandela kanskje ha blitt anbefalt å gå i terapi for å øke sin motstandsdyktighet mot ydmykende livsforhold slik at han kunne fungere bedre innenfor apartheid. Denne trenden har nå nådd til og med Kina i full kraft. Enda mer slående er linjen som går fra samme forskningen til såkalte «enhanced interrogation techniques» av mistenkte terrorister i USA. Mens legestanden i USA og psykiatere hadde nektet å delta, ga to psykologer legitimitet til metoder som baserte på «vitenskapelig» anvendelse av ydmykelse, metoder som de utviklet og overvåket mot en betaling av 81 millioner dollar. Mer enn halvparten av USAs befolkning er enig i at disse metodene som tilsvarer tortur var nødvendige for å ivareta nasjonal sikkerhet.
Hva mener du som psykolog? Hva mener du som borger som bruker psykologisk forskning? Hvis du ønsker å ta ansvar, tar du ansvar for nasjonal sikkerhet eller global human sikkerhet? Ansvar for fred og velferd definert som ivaretagelse av bestående strukturer eller for fred og velferd for alle med verdighet? Hvilke typer deltagelse i samfunnet er du villig til å frastå fra, hvilke vil du styrke eller nyskape, og hvor går grensene for deg?
Lindner foreslår å belyse disse spørsmål fra at psyko-geo-historisk perspektiv som gjør store historiske linjer nyttige for personlige, fagrelaterte og samfunnsmessige valg.
• English translation of "What Does Cultural and Community Psychology Have to Do with Dignity?":
What is the role of psychologists and of psychology in society? Who is responsible when psychology is misunderstood or misused? Is its research value neutral? Psychological theory and practice can have various effects. Evelin Lindner uses research on learned helplessness, resilience, self-esteem, and happiness as examples. This research has constructively inspired economic innovation. For instance, when questions were asked as to whether the "Gross National Product" is comprehensive enough an instrument to manage social policy issues, new concepts such as "Gross National Happiness" were formulated. On the other side has psychological theory and practice also had less constructive influences. Many warn that it has "privatized" suffering to the extent that it risks undermining the human ability to position oneself as a subject rather than an object within the broader lines of common history – in today's world Nelson Mandela would perhaps be referred to therapy to increase his resilience in the face of humiliating living conditions so as to function better within apartheid. Psychology's role in facilitating adaptation to toxic systems of thought has now reached even China in full force. Most striking is the line that goes from the same research to so-called "enhanced interrogation techniques" of suspected terrorists in the United States. While the medical profession in the United States, and its psychiatrists had refused to participate, two psychologists provided legitimacy to methods based on the "scientific" use of humiliation, methods that they developed and monitored against a payment of $ 81 million. Following this trend of psychological justifications of toxic systems of thought—often combined with some form of economic enrichment—more than half of the US population now agree that methods corresponding to torture were indeed necessary to safeguard national security.
What do you believe as a psychologist? What is your position as a citizen who uses psychological research? If you want to take responsibility, do you take responsibility for national security or global human security? Responsibility for peace and welfare defined as safeguarding existing structures, or for peace and welfare for all with dignity? What types of participation in society are you willing to opt out from, which will you strengthen or introduce, and where are the limits for you?
This talk examines these issues from a psycho-geo-historical perspective that makes large-scale historical lines of inquiry useful for personal, academic-related, and societal choices.

A Global Digniloguewith Evelin Lindner and Linda Hartling (Pdf | Video)
A dignilogue (dignity + dialogue) shared at the 2014 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 4-5, 2014.

Mein Ende gehört mir: Für das Recht auf letzte Hilfe
Viele Menschen sterben unter Bedingungen, die sie selbst als unwürdig empfinden. Ausgerechnet in ihrer letzten Lebensphase werden sie oft im Stich gelassen. Es ist an der Zeit, diesen Missstand zu beheben. Deutsche Gesellschaft für Humanes Sterben.

Dignity, Humiliation and Terrorisme: How to Think Globally
Monday lunch / Mandagslunsj with Evelin Lindner, introduction / åpningsinnlegg Inga Bostad, Norwegian Centre for Human Rights / Norsk senter for menneskerettigheter, Cort Adelers gate 30, 0162 Oslo, Norway, Seminarrom Asbjørn Eide, 2. juni 2014, 12:00 – 13:00.

Global Dignity
Presentation given at the 23rd Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, 'Returning Dignity', which took place at Chiang Mai University, Northern Thailand, 8-12th March 2014, inspired by Kjell Skyllstad and convened by Chayan Vaddhanaphuti, Professor and Founding Director of the Regional Center for Social Science and Sustainable Development (RSCD) and Director of the Center of Ethnic Studies and Development (CESD) at the Faculty of Social Sciences, Chiang Mai University. Evelin Lindner gave a brief overview over her work on dignity on 12th March 2014. The video was kindly recorded by Donna Fujimoto. Please note that this video is unedited. Please see the article 'Global Dignity: What Is It? How Do We Achieve It?' that brings together Evelin's insights on global dignity with the experiences and insights she gathered in Thailand in March and April 2014.

At the Learning Center, Interview with Carina zur Strassen and Evelin Lindner
The 23rd Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, 'Returning Dignity', took place in Chiang Mai, Thailand, 8-12th March 2014. On Day Three and Four, on 10th and 11th March 2014, the participants of the conference had the great privilege of being welcomed to Suan Lahu, a Lahu village in Northern Thailand, by Carina zur Strassen. This conversation between Carina zur Strassen and Evelin Lindner was kindly recorded by Donna Fujimotoon 10th March 2014.

At the Learning Center of the Lahu Village Suan Lahu in Northern Thailand
The 23rd Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, 'Returning Dignity', took place in Chiang Mai, Thailand, 8-12th March 2014. On Day Three and Four, on 10th and 11th March 2014, the participants of the conference had the great privilege of being welcomed to Suan Lahu, a Lahu village in Northern Thailand, by Carina zur Strassen. The video was kindly recorded by Mark Petz on 10th March 2014. It shows Evelin Lindner briefly explaining the work of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies network.

Introduction by Kjell Skyllstad and Evelin Lindner, and Presentation of Participants
The 23rd Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, 'Returning Dignity', took place in Chiang Mai, Thailand, 8-12th March 2014. On Day One, 8th March 2014, Kjell Skyllstad and Evelin Lindner opened the conference. The video was recorded by a professional team invited by Chiang Mai University.

Urban Dignity: What Is It? How Do We Achieve It?
Presentation given at the 12th Urban Culture Forum, 'Arts and Social Outreach – Designs for Urban Dignity', organised by The Urban Research Plaza, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand, room 105 of the Maha-Chulalongkorn Building, 3rd – 4th March 2014, convened by Kjell Skyllstad. Evelin Lindner gave a brief overview over her work on dignity on 4th March 2014. The video was kindly recorded by Deeyah Khan. Please note that due to technical issues, this presentation could not be given in its full length and that the video is unedited. Please see the article 'Global Dignity: What Is It? How Do We Achieve It?' that brings together Evelin's insights on global dignity with the experiences and insights she gathered in Thailand in March and April 2014.
A Dual Call for Papers had been issued for The Urban Research Plaza's 12th Urban Culture Forum, and for the Journal of Urban Culture Research. Presentations were invited spanning the wide and diverse field of urban culture. The questions below were offered as evocative guidelines rather than requirements:
'How can we open the world of art for all (children, youth, elderly, disabled, disadvantaged)? How can we promote artistic expressions of minority groups? What are the means of enlarging participation in artistic activities among urban populations? How can art stimulate and promote citizens interaction in urban planning and design? How can art activism confront urban patterns of gender inequality and humiliating practices? How can the artist community contribute to solving urban conflicts and restoring human dignity? What allows traditional cultures and values to survive? How can artists contribute to the preservation of national art treasures? What measures can be taken to promote cultural continuity in urban environments? What is the place of arts education in promoting social and environmental awareness? In short: How can we promote art for social dignity?'
• Abstract: Unity in diversity is at the centre of dignity. It means that people of all classes and colours intermingle in a spirit of mutual care and respect. Traditionally, throughout the past millennia, uniformity in division has been practised almost everywhere on the planet: to strengthen their competitive advantage over enemy out-groups, in-groups maintained a strictly unequal domination of higher beings over lesser beings. Unity in diversity is a more complex concept as it requires the readiness and ability to consider everyone else as equal in dignity, and it calls for the skills to enter into dialogue with equals. As long as such a culture is not yet established, unity in diversity has the potential to trigger uneasiness, including feelings of humiliation, and can lead to attempts to cleanse and exclude diversity so as to return to the more familiar and less complex experience of uniformity in division. Urban contexts are prime experimental laboratories for this transition. For urban dignity to flourish and social and ecological sustainability to emerge, interdisciplinary dialogue is needed to overcome the traditional practise of domination over people and over nature. Urban dignity flourishes when the city is regarded in terms of a family that collaborates in mutual communal sharing and stewardship of their environment, while urban dignity collapses when priority is given to clambering for power and status, be it through overt oppression or cloaked as economic necessity. Artists can play a central role in creating conditions for social interactions of dignity instead of humiliation. Music, for instance, has the power to unite. One example was given by Oslo citizens when they reacted to the 22 July 2011 terror attacks in Norway by gathering in front of the courthouse singing ‘The Rainbow People’.

Evelin Lindner's 'Sunflower Identity' Conceptualisation
Contribution to the 'Communication and Dignity,' Thematic Network Meeting, convened by Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Oslo, Norway, together with "Impuls" – Student Journal of Psychology at the University of Oslo and Educationforpeace-dot-com, at the University of Oslo, Norway, 23rd – 24th January 2014. See the invitation and programme in English. We thank Randi Gunhildstad for documenting this sequence with her mobile phone on 23rd January 2014.
See also "Living Globally: Global Citizenship of Care as Personal Practice," the long version of Lindner's contribution to the anthology Norwegian Citizen – Global Citizen, 2013.

The Dignilogue approach (dignity + dialogue)
Contribution to the 'Communication and Dignity,' Thematic Network Meeting, convened by Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Oslo, Norway, together with "Impuls" – Student Journal of Psychology at the University of Oslo and Educationforpeace-dot-com, at the University of Oslo, Norway, 23rd – 24th January 2014. See the invitation and programme in English. We thank Randi Gunhildstad for documenting this sequence with our video camera on 23rd January 2014.
The Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network has developed the Dignilogue approach (dignity + dialogue) over the years, taking the inspiration from the Open Space Technology by Harrison Owen, who is also a member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board. We thank Randi Gunhildstad for documenting this sequence with our video camera on 23rd January 2014.

Verdighet eller ydmykelse?
Årlig foredrag ved Psykologisk institutt ved Universitetet i Oslo, 22. januar 2014, 10.00-12.00, Aud 3, Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3 A, 0373 Oslo, Norway. See bilder. Foredraget er del av PSYC3203 – Anvendt sosialpsykologi. Se foredragene fra 2009 til 2013 ved www.sv.uio.no/tjenester/kunnskap/podkast/index.html (søk etter "Lindner"). Oversikt over emnene (pensum, tider, eksamen etc.): liste over alle emnene, semester oversikt, oversikt over profesjonsstudiet i psykologi.
Sammendrag: Fra psyc3203 emnebeskrivelsen på web: Sosialpsykologi handler om kartlegging av ulike gruppers problemer i en organisasjon eller et lokalmiljø, kanskje med sikte på å utvikle tiltak for å forebygge problemer. Sentrale begreper er makt, sosial støtte og påvirkning, deskriptive og injunktive normer, konformitet og lydighet, sosial identitet, stigma og fordomsreduksjon, selvregulering, resultat- og mestringsforventninger, attribusjon, holdningsendring og implementeringsintensjoner, prediksjon og forebygging, for eksempel knyttet til helserelatert atferd, mobbing, immigrasjon og flerkulturelle forhold. Videreutvikling av kritisk vitenskapelig tenkning står sentralt i sosialpsykologi.
Onsdagens foredrag fremhever sosialpsykologi som privilegert felt. Sosialpsykologi befinner seg i midten av mikro og makro nivået og kan dermed knytte sammen, lære av, og inspirere alt fra forskning på mikrostrukturer i biologi til makrostrukturer i statsvitenskap. Sosialpsykologi får en mer relevant plass i dagens utvikling fra autoritær undertrykkelse til likeverdig kommunikasjon og atferd, og fra utpressing av sosiale og økologiske ressurser til å gi næring til bærekraftige samfunn. Alle overfor nevnte begreper går inn i denne analysen.
Foredraget belyser særlig begrepene verdighet og ydmykelse og hvordan betydningen av disse begrepene har forandret seg i løpet av de siste generasjoner. Denne endringen er relevant for faget og for det enkelte individ.

A Global Perspective: A dignilogue with Evelin Lindner
Presentation shared on December 5, 2011, at the 2013 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 5 – 6, 2013.

Human Dignity, Humiliation and Violent Conflict – Interview with Dr. Evelin Lindner and Dr. Linda Hartling
The International Center for Ethno-Religious Mediation (ICERM) Radio is dedicated to promote positive interaction among people of different ethnicities and religious persuasions, and to increase tolerance, understanding and acceptance through programming that informs, educates, engages, mediates, and heals.
Tziporah Pronman interviewed Evelin Lindner and Linda Hartling on December 4, 2013, upon invitation by Basil Ugorji. Listen to the MP3 file of the interview.

How Are Dignity and Humiliation Relevant in Our Lives, Our Societies, and for the United Nations?
The UN Interagency Framework Team for Preventive Action cordially invited to a brown bag lunch event on Tuesday, 26 November 2013, 1pm – 2.30 pm at 1 UN Plaza (DC-1), 20th Floor Conference Room. The host was Gay Rosenblum-Kumar.
See here a video recording that is registered in YouTube as "unlisted," which means that is not publicly available (due to its rather poor video quality and because it starts after Gay Rosenblum-Kumar had explained Evelin's global life design, a life design that provides an "astronaut's" perspective). Courtney E. Furlong did the video recording. See still pictures here.
• Abstract: What is dignity? Dignity is extremely difficult to conceptualize, as is its absence. All around the world, terms such as dignity and respect are used by an increasing number of people who are becoming aware of their rights. Questions are being asked, such as: "What does dignity mean for individuals and communities especially in relation to violent conflict and recovery from conflict? When dignity is not upheld, how is the damage incurred characterized in terms of humiliation of groups or individuals? Is there a causality and relationship between humiliation and violent conflict? What is required for a society to ameliorate situations that undermine dignity, to repair damage done, and to develop and maintain "sustainable dignity" for all people? What should the United Nations do to ensure that its activities and practices protect and promote dignity?
The Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network is a global transdisciplinary fellowship of concerned academics, practitioners, activists, artists, and others, who collaborate in a spirit of mutual support to understand the complex dynamics of dignity and its violation, through disrespect and humiliation (humiliationstudies.org). This network wishes to stimulate systemic change – globally and locally – to open space for mutual respect and esteem to take root and grow, thus ending humiliating practices and breaking cycles of humiliation throughout the world. The HumanDHS movement has currently around 1,000 members from all continents and the website (humiliationstudies.org) is accessed by 20,000-40,000 people annually from more than 180 countries since its inception in 2003. In 2011, the World Dignity University initiative (worldignityuniversity.org) and the publishing house Dignity Press (dignitypress.org) were launched and have published many books since 2012. The network organizes two conferences per year, one at a different global location each year (Paris, Berlin, Costa Rica, China, Norway, Hawai'i, Istanbul, New Zealand, and South Africa). The other conference takes place each December at Columbia University, New York entitled 'Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict', with Morton Deutsch as honorary convener. More than 20 conferences have been held since 2003.
About the presenter: Evelin Lindner is the founding president of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS, www.humiliationstudies.org) and a cofounder of the World Dignity University initiative (www.worlddignity.org), which includes Dignity Press and World Dignity University Press (www.dignitypress.org). Dr. Lindner has a dual education as a Medical Doctor and a Psychologist, with two Ph.D.s. (Dr. med. and Dr. psychol.). She is a research fellow at the University of Oslo since 1997, affiliated with Columbia University since 2001 with the Advanced Consortium on Cooperation, Conflict, and Complexity, and with the Maison des Sciences de l'Homme in Paris since 2003. Her first book Making Enemies: Humiliation and International Conflict was honored as "Outstanding Academic Title" by the journal Choice for 2007 in the USA. She published her second book in 2009 on Emotion and Conflict. Her third book on Gender, Humiliation, and Global Security was published in 2010 with a Foreword by Desmond Tutu, is being highly recommended by Choice. Her fourth book, published in 2012 by World Dignity University Press, is titled A Dignity Economy. She has received several awards, among them the "Prisoner's Testament" Peace Award in 2009.

Dignity and Humiliation: Evelin Lindner
Bathabile K. S. Mthombeni, J.D., is a Mediator, Negotiator, and Conflict Management Facilitator, and she is the Founder and Principal of Untangled Resolutions: The Problem Is the Answer in New York City, U.S.A., with its weekly Blogtalkradio Sangoma, Stories from the Frontlines of Mediation. Listen to the MP3 file of the interview.
Evelin Lindner is her guest on November 21, 2013, as Evelin shares her story about how she came to develope the field of Dignity and Humiliation studies and how she navigates the world as her home: "Don't call Evelin Lindner homeless. Yes, she claims no physical address. The world is her home and, as a global citizen, she is forwarding the message that the key to our collective survival lays in equal dignity for all. Please join us as as Evelin shares the story about how growing up as a displaced person has inspired her perspective on humiliation, equal dignity and being at home in the human collective."

There is No Path to Peace. Peace Is the Path
Religious, Youth and Women's Leaders World Peace and End Wars Conference, November 14, 2013, 10:00 am to 2:00 pm, 777 United Nations Plaza 2nd Floor, UN Church Center, New York City, invited by Yongmin Shin, Director of Chonji News, which held a Peace Forum to unite North and South Korea in May 2013. See still pictures here.
• Pre Program: Chonji News Smart World Peace Forum Video – held in May 2013
Opening Remarks and Introduction of guests: Sang Myeon Lee, CEO Cheonji News, Korea, and Yongmin Shin, Director Chonji News, New York
Musical Performance: Flute by Heaven Jun and violin trio
• Part I: The Inheritance we must pass down – World Peace and End War
Readings and Speeches:
Man Lee, Heavenly Culture, World Peace and Restoration of Light Chairman – video
Deborah Moldow – The World Peace Prayer Society
Swami Parameshenanda – Bhart Sevashram Sangha
Salvatore Scarlato – President of the Korean War Veterans Association of NY
Carol Jean Willie – Sisters of Charity Federation
Arvol Looking Horse – Sacred White Buffalo – Wodakota Foundation
• Part Two: One World, One Heart, Peace for All
Korean Fan Dance by Korean Youth Association
Kiran Bali – Chairman URI – video from United Kingdom
Julie Ramaine – Christian Heral
Evelin Lindner – Human Dignity Humiliation Studies
Closing Appreciation: Yongmin Shin
• Part III – How can we Achieve World Peace? How can we break walls and become One? Workshop
The Korean Fan Dance by Korean Youth Association delighted everybody.

Konstruktive Veränderungsprozesse in der Behandlung von traumatisierten oder anders gedemütigten Menschen
Referat 5 (simultan übersetzt ins Französische), 13. September 2013, 15.30 – 16.30, im PSY & PSY-Kongress 2013 "Übergänge – eine Herausforderung / Les défits de la transition," einem gemeinsamen Kongress der Psychologen- und Psychiaterverbände der Schweiz in Montreux, Schweiz. Ich danke besonders Heidi Aeschlimann und Hans Kurt.
Sie sehen hier:
Vortrag als Powerpoint Präsentation mit Audio und Video vom 18. September 2013 (in case of trouble with downloading the document here, it is also stored on Dropbox, and Linda Hartling created a YouTube version.)
Manuskript des Vortrages vom 18. September 2013
Photos
• Abstract: Nach einem Erdbeben oder einem Unfall sind Menschen oft traumatisiert. Sie sind schockiert. Sie fühlen sich jedoch normalerweise nicht gedemütigt. Es ist ein Unterschied, ob Schmerzen durch höhere Gewalt verursacht werden, oder ob ein Mitmensch einen anderen demütigt. Die Schmerzen sind dann tiefer und schwerer zu überwinden. Fragen nach dem Selbstwert werden dann relevant, nach Rache oder Vergebung.
In Ruanda wurde Völkermord begangen als Antwort auf gefühlte Demütigung. Im Fall der systemischen Demütigung durch die Apartheid in Südafrika wurden Wahrheitskommissionen eingesetzt. Nelson Mandela besaß die menschliche Größe, Demütigung nicht mit Vergeltung zu beantworten. Er hatte die Kraft, tiefgreifende systemische Veränderungen auf den Weg zu bringen, und zwar durch etwas, was Paulo Freire conscientização, oder kritische Bewusstseinsbildung nennt und Clodomir de Morais systemische Bewusstseinsbildung.
Aus der Tiefe des Schmerzes der Demütigung erreichte Mandela das höchste Niveau von Sinnhaftigkeit, wie es von Denkern wie Viktor Frankl beschrieben wird.
Jeder Einzelne kann für sich selbst ein solches Niveau von Sinnhaftigkeit, erreichen. Es bedarf jedoch einer gewissen Anstrengung. Mandela hätte sich in sein Privatleben zurückziehen können; er ist jedoch gegen ein ganzes System aufgestanden. Auch heute ist dieser Mut nötig.
Es gibt heute zwei Gründe, warum Demütigung zunimmt; die Realität ändert sich, und die Wahrnehmung. Demütigung wird in einem sozialen Kontext der individuellen Menschenwürde stärker  wahrgenommen als in einem Kontext der kollektiven Ehre. [siehe Titel dieses Kongresses „Übergänge – eine Herausforderung“]
Es ist die Verantwortung jeden Bürgers, die Atmosphäre in der Gesellschaft so zu gestalten, dass diese Art von Sinnhaftigkeit nicht belächelt, sondern gefördert wird. Dazu gehört es, auf gesellschaftlicher Ebene umzudefinieren, was Eigennutz ist, und was Idealismus. [siehe Titel dieses Kongresses „Übergänge – eine Herausforderung“] Der Volksentscheidung zur Begrenzung von Managergehältern in der Schweiz ist ein vorbildliches Beispiel für die Welt.
• Evelin Lindner erhielt den SBAP. Preis 2006 in Angewandter Psychologie des Schweizerischer Berufsverband für Angewandte Psychologie.
Auswirkungen von Demütigung auf Menschen und Völker, Vortrag aus Anlass der 3. Verleihung des SBAP. Preises in Angewandter Psychologie, verliehen vom Schweizerischen Berufsverband für Angewandte Psychologie SBAP an Evelin Lindner. Siehe auch ein kurzes einführendes Statement.
Four Horsemen – Feature Documentary, 2013, recommended by Anthony Marsella.

A Dignity Economy
Lunch time discussion to trace the connections between a "Dignity Economy," "Values Based Leadership," "Inclusive Innovation," "Business Model Innovation," and "Management and Leadership Education," convened by Associate Professor Kosheek Sewchurran, University of Cape Town, South Africa, Innovation Management & Information Systems, Graduate School of Business, on 5th July 2013. See still pictures.

Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies: Transdisciplinarity in Practice
This workshop on 'Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies: Transdisciplinarity in Practice' was convened by Robert Morrell, University of Cape Town, South Africa, co-ordinator of the Programme for the Enhancement of Research Capacity (PERC), 4th July 2013. Evelin Lindner explained her global life in service of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies network (www.humiliationstudies.org). See still pictures.

Introductory Presentation: Who We Are and Our Latest News
24th April 2013, at the 21st Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies 'Search for Dignity' at the University of Stellenbosch in South Africa, 24th – 27th April 2013 (unfortunately, reduced video quality).

Verdighetens økonomi
Stord kyrkjeakademi, Stord, West Coast of Norway, 19th February 2013. Upon the kind invitation of Tora and Dag-Eirik Eikeland.
See pictures.

Ydmykelse som bakenforliggende motiv i internasjonale konflikter og politisk massevold
Lecture at the Department of Political Science/Institutt for statsvitenskap, at the University of Oslo, invited by Bernt Hagtvet, as part of STV1530 – Folkemord og politisk massevold i det 20. århundrets politikk, Aud 1, SV-Bygget, Blindern, 25th January 2013, 14.15-16.00.

How Can We Break the Cycles of Humiliation and Co-create Our Common Future?
Interview with James Alexander Arnfinsen, Levevei™ ("way of life"), en podkast show om utvikling. This interview was pre-recorded on 11th January, 2013, and placed online on 12th January 2013.

Dignity, Humiliation, and Conflict: Interview with Pattie Porter
Texas Conflict Coach Blog Talk Radio
This interview was pre-recorded on Monday, November 26, 2012, from 12 noon EST.
Air date of podcast: January 8, 2013. Listen to the MP3 file of the interview.

World Citizen Radio with Garry Davis
Global Radio Alliance, Sunday, November 11, 2012
You can also listen to Evelin's download of this interview.

Conflict Resolution
Contribution via Skype to the fall 2012 course Conflict Resolution by Hayal Köksal at the Educational Sciences Department, Faculty of Education, Boğaziçi University, Istanbul, Turkey, 2nd October 2012. Questions were posed by ‎‎‎Mustafa Furkan Şengel‎, ‎‎Hatice Kılıç‎, ‎and Alper Aktaş‎‎‎. See pictures.

Radio intervju med Margrete Nåvik
NRK (Norsk rikskringkasting / Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation) Radio P1, 'God helg', innspilling 6. september 2012, kringkasting 16. september 2012.
'Margrete Nåvik og Viggo Valle er morgenloser i "God helg" på NRK P1. På morgenkvisten i P1 i helgene byr de to på gode samtaler, møte med mennesker fra alle verdenshjørner, tid til ettertanke og refleksjon, lytteroppgaver og musikk håndplukket for tidlige helgemorgener'.
Se også artikkel Ny helgemorgen i P1.
Siden mange spør mht. min musikk smak: Jeg liker stemme, uten instrumenter, uten rytme, improvisert, stemme som uttrykker emosjoner dypt fra sjelen, spontant, akkurat som det føles i det øyeblikket når det blir sunget, helst av én eller flere soloister. Min største opplevelse var når Ole Henrik Magga joiket i en dialog sammen med sin sønn ved Higher Education for Peace konferanse i Tromsø 4.-6. mai 2000. Jeg har dessverre ingen opptak, ellers ville det ha vært mitt første valg for dette "god helg" programmet. Jeg foreslo mitt nest-beste valg til Margrete, nemlig Amina Alaoui. Amina synger musikk fra Granadas kulturelle høytid som varte til 1492. Jeg liker Aminas måte å modulere stemmen på, jeg liker også fraværet av vestlig rytme, jeg liker det så mye at jeg kan nesten leve med instrumentaliseringen og mangel på spontanitet siden det er en sang og ikke en improvisering. Den andre sangen i programmet valgte ikke jeg. Den andre sangen er et eksempel på det motsatte av min preferanse. Spontan uttrykk av emosjon gjennom stemme blir unngått i dette stykke, all spontanitet blir fjernet og stemmen blir tvunget inn i en streng vestlig rytme. Stemmen blir brukt som et ikke-stemme instrument. Instrumenter eier et viss spektrum av uttrykksmulighet og en god musikker kan utnytte dette. I dette stykke skjer det motsatte: stemmens uendelige uttrykksmuligheter blir avskåret for å ligne på vanlige instrumenter og passe seg inn i et sammspill av flere instrumenter. Det betyr ikke at jeg ikke setter pris på dette sangstykket eller på instrumentalmusikk generelt, det betyr bare at det ikke er min preferanse.

The Paradigm of Dignity: An interview with Dr. Evelin Gerda Lindner, Gaialogue with Joanna Harcourt-Smith
Furture Primitive, 24th August 2012.
Evelin Lindner speaks with Joanna abour dignity as sustainability; inequality and humiliation: Rwanda and South Africa; convergence of activism and spiritual practice; living “a dignity economy”; love and social cohesion instead of predator capitalism; the World Dignity University…
Listen to the MP3 file of the interview.

Who We Are and Our Latest New
Introductory presentation on 27th August 2012 at the 19th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies “In the Aftermath of the 22nd July: How to Sustain a Global Culture of Equality in Dignity or likeverd”, University of Oslo, Norway, and, via video connection, Portland, Oregon, U.S.A., 27th – 30th August 2012.

Education, Dignity, and Crosscultural Communication
Workshop in English at the Associação Brasil-América (ABA) for the ABA administrative-cultural staff and faculty, invited by Eduardo J. G. Carvalho, Executive Director of ABA, and ABA Co-founder Francisco Cardoso Gomes de Matos, Recife, Brazil, 15th June 2012. See the announcement and the invitation. See also the article Humilihação e Dignidade by Tereza Halliday, published in the newspaper Diário de Pernambuco on 4th June 2012.
Please see here photos from Evelin's camera.

O papel da Dignidade e da Humilhação no que Concerne à Paz, à Humanização e à Conciliação em Contextos Familiar e Universitário / The Role of Dignity and Humiliation in Regard to Peace, Harmony, Reconciliation and Forgiveness (English, with simultaneous translation into Portuguese)
Lecture at the Center for Philosophy and Humanities of the University of Pernambuco in Recife, Brazil, 12th June 2012. When you watch the video (see Part I and Part II), please be aware that Evelin listens to the Portuguese translation through earphones and that the pauses are caused by her waiting for Fatiha Dechicha Parahyba, the translator, to finish before continueing.
See a brief video in Portuguese (see the mp4 the flv version) by Maria José Luna, current president of the Dom Helder Camara Human Rights Commission at the University of Pernambuco, and Director of the Federal University of Pernambuco Press.
Português: Palestra na Centro de Filosofia e Ciências Humana, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, Brasil, 12 de Junho 2012. Quando você assistir ao vídeo (Part I e Part II), por favor, esteja ciente de que Evelin ouve a tradução Português através de fones de ouvido e que as pausas são causados ​​por ela à espera de Fatiha Dechicha Parahyba, o tradutor, para terminar antes de continuar. Veja um breve vídeo em Português por Maria José Luna, atual presidente do Dom Helder Camara Comissão de Direitos Humanos da Universidade de Pernambuco e Diretor da UFPE Imprensa.
See the announcements prior to the event, both as a poster and on the UFPE website 1 + 2. Please click here to see still photos from Evelin's camera, and here to see still photos from UFPE's official camera.

Humilhação, Dignidade e Direitos Humanos (Português/Inglês, Portuguese/English)
Palestra na Comissão de Direitos Humanos e Minorias (Committee for Human Rights and Minorities), Câmara dos Deputados (Chamber of Deputies), Brasilia, Brasil, 5 de Junho 2012. Invited by Deputado Domingos Dutra, President of the Committee for Human Rights and Minorities, and Ricardo Jose Pereira Rodrigues, Senior Policy Specialist in the Office of Legislative Counsel and Policy Guidance at the Chamber of Deputies.
See the announcement prior to the event (or see here). Listen to an audio clip from the event. See, furthermore, a summary after the event (or see here). Finally, watch a short video message on dignity to the Brazilian people recorded by the journalist Alex Paniago after the talk. Please click here to see still photos.

Creating a Dignified World: A Video Message to the Brazilian People from Evelin Lindner
Comissão de Direitos Humanos e Minorias (Committee for Human Rights and Minorities), Câmara dos Deputados (Chamber of Deputies), Brasilia, Brasil, 5th June 2012.

Humiliation, Dignity and Reconciliation / Humilhação, Dignidade e Reconciliação
Palestra em inglês com tradução consecutiva. Centro Universitário Maria Antonia da Universidade de São Paulo, Salão Nobre Rua Maria Antônia, 258, 3º andar, Vila Buarque, São Paulo, SP. Coordenação Sergio Adorno (FFLCH, NEV e Cátedra UNESCO – USP). Mediação Guilherme Assis de Almeida (Faculdade de Direito – USP). Apoio: Cátedra da UNESCO na USP (Cátedra Educação para a Paz, Democracia, Direitos Humanos e Tolerância). 1º de junho de 2012, 20h.
English: Lecture in English with consecutive translation together with Professor Sergio Adorno, Professor of Sociology, University of São Paulo. Mediation Guilherme Assis de Almeida, Law School, University of São Paulo. Supported by the UNESCO Chair Education for Peace, Democracy, Human Rights and Tolerance, and the Centro Maria Antônia at the University of São Paulo, 1st June 2012.
Please see the invitation. Please see also the video of this lecture. See still pictures. See here the entire São Paulo Agenda so kindly organized by Gabriela Saab.

Dialogue on Dignity and Humiliation (Português/Inglês, Portuguese/English, simultaneously translated by Gabriela Saab)
Presentation given at Centro de Direitos Humanos e Educação Popular de Campo Limpo (CHDEP) in Jardim Ângela, São Paulo, where also Fernando Rangel presented the path-breaking Agência Popular Solano Trindade, which is a currency, a bank, and a community in Capão Redondo, Friday, 1st June 2012.
See the video where Gabriela Saab Presents the World Dignity University in Portuguese. Ury did the recording.
Capão Redondo, Parque Santo Antônio, and Jardim Ângela, in the periphery of São Paulo, are home to a combined total of more than half a million people. Jardim Ângela, Capão Redondo, and Jardim São Luis, were considered by the São Paulo Civil Police to be the "triangle of death." In 1996, there were 538 people murdered in this area, most of whom were teenagers.
See here the entire São Paulo Agenda so kindly organized by Gabriela Saab. Please click here to see still photos.

Dialogue on Dignity and Humiliation (Português/Inglês, Portuguese/English, , simultaneously translated by Gabriela Saab)
Presentation given at Cidade Escola Aprendiz in Vila Madalena, São Paulo, kindly invited by Helena Singer, 1st June 2012.
See here the entire São Paulo Agenda so kindly organized by Gabriela Saab. Please click here to see still photos.

Educação, Conflitos e Democracia
Mesa-redonda, participação de Evelin Lindner e Annie Dymetman, doutora em Sociologia, e membro-fundadora da Casa da Mediação de Conflitos na Universidade São Judas Tadeu. Mediação Helena Singer (pós-doutora pela Universidade Estadual de Campinas e diretora pedagógica da Associação Cidade Escola Aprendiz). Memorial da América Latina, Sala dos Espelhos, Av. Auro Soares de Moura Andrade, 664, Saõ Paulo, Brasil, 29 de Maio 2012.
English: Education, Conflict and Democracy, roundtable, participation by Evelin Lindner and Annie Dymetman, PhD in Sociology, and a founding member of the House of Conflict Resolution at the University São Judas Tadeu. Mediation by Helena Singer (post-doctorate from the University of Campinas and pedagogical director of the Associação Cidade Escola Aprendiz).
Please see the invitation. Please see also the video of this lecture. See still pictures. See here the entire São Paulo Agenda so kindly organized by Gabriela Saab.

Dignidade Humana e o Desemprego
Palestra no Grupo de Apoio Psicoprofissional (GAP) que atende desempregados na cidade de Guarulhos, Rua Harry Simonsen, 202, Guarulhos, Brasil, 26 de Maio 2012, com Gabriela Saab.
English: Human Dignity and Unemployment, lecture in the Psycho-professional Support Group (GAP) that serves the unemployed in the city of Guarulhos, Harry Street Simonsen, 202, Guarulhos, Brazil, 26th May 2012, with Gabriela Saab.
See a short report. See here pictures. See here the entire São Paulo Agenda so kindly organized by Gabriela Saab.

International Law in Relation to Humiliation and Armed Conflict
Lecture at the University of São Paulo, Brazil, Faculty of Law in the International Criminal Law, in the course taught by Prof. Cláudia Perrone-Moisés, Thursday, 24th May, 2012.
Portuguese: Humilhação e Conflito Armado, palestra na Faculdade de Direito (sala Miguel Reale, 3º. Andar) no curso Direito Internacional Penal ministrado pela Profa. Dra. Cláudia Perrone-Moisés, Universidade de São Paulo, Brasil, 24 de Maio 2012.
Please see here the video of this lecture. Fabricio Rodrigo Costa kindly did the video-taping. Please see here still photos, kindly taken by Marcelle Guil. See here the entire São Paulo Agenda organized by Gabriela Saab. See also Professor Murilo Jardelino da Costa without whom this programme would not be the same! Thank you, dear Gaby and Murilo!
See here the entire São Paulo Agenda so kindly organized by Gabriela Saab.

A Letter to My Father – Memories of Humiliation in International Conflicts
Lecture in the course of literature by Dr. Laura P. Zuntini of Izarra, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, the Faculty of Philosophy and Humanities, Department of Modern Languages​​, 24th May 2012.
Portuguese: Palestra no curso de literatura pela Dra. Laura P. Zuntini de Izarra, na Faculdade de Filosofia, Letras e Ciências Humanas, Departamento de Letras Modernas, Universidade de São Paulo, Brasil, 24 de Maio 2012.
Please see here the video of this lecture. Gabriela Saab kindly did the video-taping. Please see here still pictures, kindly taken by Marcelle Guil.
See here the entire São Paulo Agenda so kindly organized by Gabriela Saab.

Reflexões Democráticas: Direitos Humanos, Tolerância e Humilhação (Democratic Reflections: Human Rights, Tolerance and Humiliation, see also pdf and another pdf)
Conversa no Instituto Norberto Bobbio, São Paulo, Brasil, com Evelin Lindner, com a apresentação de David Calderoni, psicanalista do Núcleo de Psicopatologia, Políticas Públicas de Saúde Mental e Ações Comunicativas em Saúde Pública (NUPSI). Tradução: Professor Dr. Maurizio Russo, Instituto Norberto Bobbio, 22 de Maio 2012.
See here pictures. See here the entire São Paulo Agenda so kindly organized by Gabriela Saab.

Do We Need Concepts such as Humiliation, Dignity, and Respect to Understand Majority/Minority Relations? (high density and MP4 format)
This video was created on 10th May 2012 in the Valle de las Animas (Valley of the Souls) near La Paz, Bolivia, as a contribution to the seminar "Majority and Immigrants: Social Psychological Aspects," to be held on Thursday, 31st May 2012, at the University of Oslo, Department of Psychology, Norway, in honor of Reidar Ommundsen.
See here pictures of the 10th May. See here the entire São Paulo Agenda so kindly organized by Gabriela Saab.

La Ética de la Dignidad y la Humildad, Presentación de la iniciativa Universidad Mundial de la Dignidad: Charla por El Departamento de extensión del Instituto de Ciencias Religiosas Ad Instar Facultatis de la Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Chile.
20th April 2012, El Departamento de extensión del Instituto de Ciencias Religiosas Ad Instar Facultatis de la Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Chile.
See the invitation that Vanessa Araya Fuentes sent out for this event: Invitación Clase Magistral: El Departamento de extensión del Instituto de Ciencias Religiosas Ad Instar Facultatis de la Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, le saluda atentamente y tiene el agrado de invitar a usted a participar de la Conferencia Magistral, "La Ética de la Dignidad y la Humildad, Presentación de la iniciativa Universidad Mundial de la Dignidad", Presentación e investigación realizada por la destacada Doctora alemana Evelin Lindner, miembro fundadora y representante de la World Dignity University, red mundial de académicos y profesionales, interesados en estimular el cambio sistémico, global y local. La actividad tendrá lugar el viernes 20 de abril, a las 11:45 horas, en la sala 3-20 ubicada en la Casa Central de la Universidad (Av. Brasil 2950, Valparaíso). Saludos Cordiales Pedro Boccardo Rojas, Magíster en Teología y Bioética, Jefe de Extensión, Instituto de Ciencias Religiosas, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Vanessa Araya Fuentes, Licenciada en Filosofía y Educación, Doctoranda en Filosofía, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso. Please click here to see photos.

Dignidad humana en el quehacer político: Charla por 79 años del Partido Socialista de Chile
19th April 2012, Valparaíso, Chile.
Please see the three hosts listed on the picture on the right side. Note the Juventud Socialista de Chile (Socialist Youth of Chile), the Partido Socialista de Valparaíso (Socalist Party of Valparaíso), and the Biblioteca Popular (Library of the People) in Valparaíso. Since I am new to understanding the depth of the role that Salvador Allende played, and still plays for Chile, and for Latin America as a whole, I think that it is helpful to see the Discurso de Salvador Allende para los estudiantes that he gave at the Universidad de Guadalajara, México, Diciembre 1972. Please click here to see photos.

Dignidad humana en el quehacer político: Charla por el Colegio Mar Abierto in Valparaíso, Chile
19th April 2012, Colegio Mar Abierto in Valparaíso, Chile, in the building of the former German school. Please note the memorial plate with the names of those Germans who were conscripted into World War I. Jewish immigrants from Germany removed and melted down the plate which honored those who had participated in Hitler's WWII. Please click on the pictures above or here to see more photos.

¿Se puede manifestar más dignidad? En lugar de más humillación?: Charla harla para Universidad de Valparaíso
10th April 2012, Universidad de Valparaíso, Chile.
This talk was given in German, kindly translated by Claudia Arcos into Spanish. See the political background for this talk described in an article in The Economist, Chile: Progress and its Discontents – A popular student rebellion shows that, as Chileans become better off, they want the government to guarantee a fairer society. Politicians are struggling to respond, Friday, April 13th 2012.
Please click here to see photos.

Encuentra Cordinadoria de la Universidad Mondial de la Dignidad
Seminar with Evelin Lindner at the Dialogue Home of Howard Richards and the Centro para el desarrollo alternativo en Limache, Chile, 5th April 2012, upon the invitation of Howard Richards and Claudia Arcos Duarte (who translated from German into Spanish) and Andrea Osorio Mendez (who contributed with making food).
We concluded that dignity, or equality in dignity, is a notion we have in our bodies, and that words, such as solidarity or fraternity all are insufficient.
Please click here to see photos.
See here the invitation to this event that Claudia Arcos sent out on April 4, 2012:
Te invitamos a conocer la Universidad mundial por la dignidad, a trav és de Evelin Lindner
Hola te invitamos a conocer este ser increíble que es Evelin Lindner, fundadora y coordinadora de la universidad por la dignidad humana. Aquí una muy breve presentación de quien es ella y los que hacen "WORLD DIGNITY UNIVERSITY":
Nosotros, los Estudios de la dignidad humana y la humillación (HumanDHS), son una red global e interdisciplinario y la comunión de los académicos y profesionales interesados. Estamos comprometidos a reducir – y en última instancia, ayudar a eliminar – la falta de respeto destructiva y prácticas humillantes en todo el mundo. Nuestro trabajo se inspira en los valores universales como la dignidad, la humildad, el respeto mutuo cuidado y la compasión, y un sentido de compartir los derechos y responsabilidades planetarias. Somos, ante todo, una red global de personas con el objetivo de aumentar la sensibilización y la creación de encuadres y visiones que promueven la igual dignidad de todos. Deseamos para fertilizar y generar la investigación transdisciplinaria (intra e intercultural) y difundir información destinada a mejorar la conciencia de la dignidad humana. También animamos a la aplicación de métodos creativos y estrategias educativas, así como fertilizar más a punto de los proyectos de intervención y la planificación de las políticas públicas. Por lo tanto, trabajamos en cuatro aspectos, en primer lugar como una red global, en segundo lugar en la investigación, en tercer lugar en la educación, y en cuarto lugar con la intervención. Nos dirigimos a todos los niveles, micro, meso y macro levels. On 24 de junio 2011, se inició el proceso de levantamiento de nuestra investigación y las actividades de educación en un nivel más concreto y puso en marcha la Iniciativa Mundial de la Dignidad de la Universidad. Dado que somos una red global, la los límites son fluidos. Invitamos cordialmente a todos las personas de ideas afines para contribuir. Por favor, consulte nuestra llamada a la creatividad . Nuestros miembros no "suscribir" o "apoyar" todo lo que está sucediendo dentro de HumanDHS. Todo el mundo está llamado a contribuir en el mejor de la capacidad. Esperamos que la sinergia que surge de todas las contribuciones facilitará nuevas ideas y de acción.
Ella es Doctorada en medicina y psicología, pero en realidad es un mapa completo , viviente lleno de experiencias que ha ido acumulando en los últimos cuarenta años viviendo en los distintos continentes. Esta es su primera visita a Latinoamerica, siendo su primera pasada por Chile. Y para los que estamos en la 5ta región un gran encuentro. El jueves a las 10 am. en Centro para el Desarrollo Alternativo en Limache, se ruega confirmar asistencia ya que el espacio es reducido el aporte es voluntario de mínimo 500 pesos. saludos afectuosos Claudia Arcos

Interview with Ignacia Imboden
for the catholic radio program La Fibra / Radio Amor 99.3 FM in Viña del Mar, Chile, 4th April 2012. The journalist Ignacia Imboden came to Limache, Chile, to interview Evelin Lindner and Howard Richards, for a program of half an hour on Saturday or Sunday. Claudia Arcos Duarte was so kind to translate from German to Spanish (Ignacia and Evelin could have communicated in French, but the radio listeners would not have benefitted from that). Please click here to see photos.
La Fibra / Radio Amor 99.3 FM: " La Fibra #23 Jueves, 12 de Abril de 2012 Conversación grabada en Limache el miercoles 04 de Abril, al aire el Jueves 05. Conversamos con Evelin Lindner, Founding President of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, sobre como desarrollar ideas de Dignidad Humana que iluminen el actuar del hombre en todos sus aspectos, terminando con las prácticas humillantes de las que todos somos objeto de alguna forma, en un sistema pragmático que nos ve pomo piezas de un engranaje. La entrevista está en Alemán, pero es traducida por Claudia Arcos, nuestra querida colaboradora limachina."

Ydmykelse er årsaken til krig, vold og undertrykking
'Evelin Lindner har forsket på ydmykelsens psykologi, og hun kaller ydmykelse for "følelsenes atombombe".'
Intervju med Aase Cathrine Myrtveit for NRK (Norsk rikskringkasting / Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation) Radio P2, Verdibørsen, sendt 25. februar 2012.

Ydmykelse og folkemord – den indre forbindelsen
Lecture at the Institutt for statsvitenskap / Department of Political Science at the University of Oslo, invited by Bernt Hagtvet, as part of STV1530 – Folkemord og politisk massevold i det 20. århundre, Aud 1, SV-Bygget, Blindern, 17th February 2012.
Please see a background paper for this lecture Terror in Norway: How Can We Continue from a Point of Utter despair? Promoting a Dignity Culture, not Just Locally, but Globally a paper originally prepared for the 17th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies “Enlarging the Boundaries of Compassion” in Dunedin, New Zealand. See pictures.

Ydmykelse, identitet og konflikt
Lecture at the Politihøgskolen i Oslo / Norwegian Police University College, invited by Jai Ganapathy, fagansvarlig for studiet Konflikthåndtering i et flerkulturelt samfunn ved Politihøgskolen i Oslo, 13th February 2012, 13.00-15.00. See pictures.

After 22nd July: Humiliation and Terrorism
Lecture at the Centre for Gender Research / Senter for tverrfaglig kjønnsforskning at the University of Oslo, Norway, 4th floor, room 420, Gaustadalléen 30 D, 8th February 2012, 12.00-13.15. See pictures.

Humiliation and Terrorism
Lecture at the Department of Psychology/Psykologisk institutt at the University of Oslo, Norway (Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3, Auditorium 1, as part of PSYC3203 – Anvendt sosialpsykologi, see also www.sv.uio.no), 25th January, 2012, 10.15-12.00. See video tape and pictures.
Please see a background paper for this lecture Terror in Norway: How Can We Continue from a Point of Utter despair? Promoting a Dignity Culture, not Just Locally, but Globally a paper originally prepared for the 17th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies “Enlarging the Boundaries of Compassion” in Dunedin, New Zealand.
Introduction: On 22nd July 2011, Norway suffered two sequential terrorist attacks against its civilian population, the government, and a political summer camp in Norway. This tragedy has shocked Norway to the point that even mentioning the name of the 32-year-old perpetrator Anders Behring Breivik was being avoided for a while and ABB was being used to refer to him. He was first regarded as right-wing terrorist and later, in an initial evaluation, diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia. A second evaluation began on 13th January 2012. The guiding questions of this paper are the following: What should be done after such atrocities have occurred? How can one continue from a point of utter despair? What can a society do to help its members? What can a society do to help prevent repetitions of similar acts of violence in the future?

Imagine Worcester #70 Linda Hartling and Evelin Lindner: Interview with Virginia Swain
Virginia Swain is the host of Imagine Worcester and the World, WCCA TV, a public access TV station and community media center in Worcester, Massachusetts, U.S.A., October 17, 2011.

Welcome from the HumanDHS President: Exlaining Our World Dignity University Initiative
Introductory Presentation at the 2011 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 8-9, 2011. See also Evelin Lindner's Video Invitation to Join the World Dignity University Initiative.
This talk has two parts, related to Evelin's two roles. Her first role is to be the principal convener, together with Linda M. Hartling, of this workshop and our overall HumanDHS network. Her second role is to be one HumanDHS researcher among many. Respectively, the first part of her talk addresses the overall aim of our HumanDHS work (see here a transcription), while the second part gives a very brief introduction to her theory of humiliation. She uses a particularly broad lens, both with respect to the length of history she includes (entire human history), as well as with respect to its transcultural and transdisciplinary approach. Her theory highlights how globalization is interlinked with new and unprecedented psychological dynamics (among others, the emerging significance of the phenomenon of humiliation) that call for novel solutions at all levels – macro, meso, and micro levels, and in all fields of of inquiry and implementation into public policy.

Introduction to the Work of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies Network and the World Dignity University Initiative, introductory presentation, "Occupy Equal Dignity," gathering convened by Linda Hartling, 16th October 2011, Portland, Oregon, U.S.A..

Introduction to the Work of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies Network
Introductory presentation, "Holistic Practices Beyond Borders" group, weekly gathering convened by Michelle Brenner, 12th September 2011, Sydney, Australia.

Who We Are and Our Latest News
Introductory presentation on 29th August 2011, at the 17th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies “Enlarging the Boundaries of Compassion” in Dunedin, New Zealand, 29th August – 1st September 2011.

Terror in Norway: How Can We Continue from a Point of Utter despair? Promoting a Dignity Culture, not Just Locally, but Globally
Paper prepared for the 17th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies “Enlarging the Boundaries of Compassion” in Dunedin, New Zealand, 29th August – 1st September 2011.
Abstract: On 22nd July 2011, Norway suffered two sequential terrorist attacks against its civilian population, the government, and a political summer camp in Norway. This tragedy has shocked Norway to the point that even mentioning the name of the 32-year-old perpetrator was being avoided for a while. Anders Behring Breivik was first regarded as right-wing terrorist and later, in an initial evaluation, diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia. Currently, a second evaluation is being carried out.
The guiding questions of this paper are the following: What should be done after such atrocities have occurred? How can one continue from a point of utter despair? What can a society do to help its members? What can a society do to help prevent repetitions of similar acts of violence in the future?

From Humiliation to Dignity, press release by Evelin Lindner and David Reade, 22nd August 2011, announcing the 17th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies “Enlarging the Boundaries of Compassion” in Dunedin, New Zealand, 29th August – 1st September 2011.

Evelin Lindner with Will Pollard in a ten minutes pre-recorded telephone interview, News & Editorial Director, 95bFM, 23th August 2011. See the podcast on www.95bFM.com. Listen to the MP3 file of the interview.

Com or Chaos – Evelin Lindner, with Marvin Hubbard for one hour in the studio of Otago Access Radio, previously known as Toroa Radio, Dunedin, 25th August 2011, 10.00 am. Marvin Hubbard presents Com or Chaos as"an hour of interesting and eclectic but often topical radio. Marvin interviews a wide range of people from religious leaders and teachers through to ecological activists and touring musicians." See pictures.

Sunday Morning – Dr Evelin Lindner. Dr. Evelin Lindner is a specialist on humiliation studies and believes that the corrosive effect of humiliation is the cause of much of humanity's troubles. (19′27″). Sunday, 28th August 2011, 8.40 am, Evelin Lindner in the Dunedin studio of Radio New Zealand with Chris Laidlaw (from the Wellington studio). Chris Laidlaw: "Discussion, features and ideas until midday (produced by Christine Cessford). Chris Laidlaw presents a thought provoking range of interviews, documentaries and music over four entertaining hours each Sunday Morning. Highlights include Insight at 8.15am, Mediawatch at 9.05am, extended interviews at 8.40am and 9.30am and after the news at 10am, and at 10:40am there's Trevor Reekie's Hidden Treasures, followed by listeners' feedback at 10:55am. Ideas rounds off the morning between 11am and midday."
Listen to the MP3 file of the interview.

Gender, Humiliation, and Global Security
Lunch presentation at the Centre for Gender Research / Senter for tverrfaglig kjønnsforskning at the University of Oslo, 23rd June 2011.
Abstract: In her work, Evelin Lindner uses "a wide-angle geohistorical lens that encompasses the entire history of the species of Homo sapiens. Large-scale models often explain details much more simply than is possible by studying the details themselves. This lens helps illustrate that destructive cultural, social, and psychological scripts from the past still permeate all levels of human activity, from micro to macro, and that they are being detected, rejected, and transcended much too slowly. It highlights how humankind's various subgroups experienced the human condition throughout history, how they crafted change and how their experiences are both similar and different across cultures" (Introduction, Gender, Humiliation, and Global Security, 2010).
See pictures.

Dignity or Humiliation in Economic and Monetary Systems
LEVE – Levekår i utviklingsland/Livelihoods in developing countries lunch lecture, 17th June 2011, 01:00 PM – 03:00 PM, Centre for Development and the Environment (SUM), Sognsveien 68, Oslo, Seminar Room, 4th floor.
Abstract: In her work, Evelin Lindner uses a wide-angle geohistorical lens that encompasses the entire history of the species of Homo sapiens. Large-scale models often explain details much more simply than is possible by studying the details themselves. Her work suggests that the notion of livelihood may need to be emphasized, rather than the notion of work. If humankind wishes to create a dignified and dignifying sustainable future for itself, it may be necessary to deeply inquire into the definition of development. Perhaps so-called developing countries are the home for important lessons to be heeded by the entire world?

Landeskogen som fyrtårn for verdighet i verden
Brief presentation at the International Landeskogen Peace Center, Southern Norway, 7th June 2011.
See pictures.

Ydmykelse, verdighet og nestekjærlighet
Lecture (60 minutter på norsk) at Den norske filosofifestivalen "På kanten" in Kragerø, South Norway, 1st-5th June 2011. The overall theme is kjærlighet or love.
"På kanten" is a Norwegian philosophyfestival in Kragerø, South Norway. The festival is being held once a year.
See pictures.
• Summary engelsk:
In her work, Evelin Lindner uses a wide-angle geohistorical lens that encompasses the entire history of the roughly 200,000 years period that the species of Homo sapiens has roamed its home planet. Large-scale models often explain details much more simply than is possible by studying the details themselves. This lens helps illustrate that destructive cultural, social, and psychological scripts from the past still permeate all levels of human activity, from micro to macro, and that they are being detected, rejected, and transcended much too slowly. In her book Gender, Humiliation, and Global Security (2010), she advocates a message that philosopher Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (1881–1955) formulated as follows: "Someday, after mastering the winds, the waves, the tides and gravity, we shall harness the energies of love, and then, for a second time in the history of the world, man will have discovered fire."
• Sammendrag norsk:
I arbeidet sitt bruker Evelin Lindner en bred geohistorisk innfallsvinkel for å belyse den 200.000 år lange perioden som Homo sapiens har regjert på jorden. Storskalamodeller forklarer ofte detaljer bedre enn hva detaljstudier gjør. Forskningen hennes viser at destruktive kulturelle, sosiale og psykologiske mønstre fra fortiden fremdeles gjennomsyrer alle nivåer av menneskelig aktivitet, fra mikro til makronivå, og at arbeidet med å oppdage, avvise, og overskride dem går altfor sakte. I boken Gender, Humiliation, og Global Security (2010) støtter Lindner filosofen Pierre Teilhard de Chardins (1881-1955) budskap: "En dag, etter å ha temmet vinden, bølgene, tidevannet og tyngdekraften, skal vi utnytte energien i kjærligheten, og da vil mennesket, for andre gang i historien, ha oppdaget ilden."

• Dignity and Transcultural Security, by Joseph Prabhu, Professor of Philosophy, California State University of Los Angeles (CSLA), US
• Dignity and National Security by Gregory Fried, Professor and Chair, Philosophy Department, Suffolk University, Boston, US
• Dignity and Trans-National Security,
by Evelin G. Lindner
Invited to participate in the workshop "Dignity and Global Security" on 31st May 2011, 14.00 – 15.30, led by Nayef Al-Rodhan, as part of the 9th International Security Forum, 30th May–1st June 2011, Zurich, Switzerland, on behalf of the Programme on the Geopolitics of Globalisation and Transnational Security and the Geneva Centre for Security Policy.
The 9th International Security Forum is being organised by the Center for Security Studies (CSS) and the International Relations and Security Network (ISN) at ETH Zurich, the Geneva Centre for Security Policy (GCSP), the Geneva International Centre for Humanitarian Demining (GICHD), the Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces (DCAF), and the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva. The event focuses on the theme “Regional and Global Security: Meeting Tomorrow’s Challenges Today” and provides the opportunity for hundreds of experts from all related fields to discuss the changing security environment in a comprehensive, multidisciplinary, and dynamic way. More information on the event as well as the draft programme is available at www.gcsp.ch/Globalisation and www.sustainablehistory.com.
Some policy recommendations for a more peaceful and cooperative world:
• Overcome the bad reputation of globalisation among many critical avantgarde thinkers, recognise the value of ingathering and the notion of one human family: "For the first time since the origin of our species, humanity is in touch with itself” (William Ury, 1999, XVII). Globalisation can and must be humanised through egalisation.
• National security hinges on global security: In a fragmented world, the motto "If you want peace, prepare for war" is unavoidable due to the security dilemma. Only an emphasis on global security can manifest Gandhi's strategy of "There is no path to peace. Peace is the path."
• Mainstream the principles of unity in diversity and subsidiarity.
• Mainstream satyāgraha or Axelrod's evolutionary tit-for-tat strategy.
See pictures.

Historical Choice of Today: Dignity or Humiliation – Dignity for One Human Family in One Jointly Protected World, or Humiliation for a Fragmented Family in an Ever More Plundered World
Invited talk given on 16th April 2011, at Pszinapszis, XV. Psychology Days at the Angyalföldi József Attila Művelődési Központ (a community centre, called AJAMK) in Budapest, Hungary, from 15th-17th April, 2011.

Abstract: Morton Deutsch, "father" of the field of conflict resulution, wrote in 1973: "In a cooperative situation the goals are so lin-ked that everybody 'sinks or swims' together, while in the competitive situation if one swims, the other must sink." In her talk, Lindner argues that, at present, global society has not yet learned to swim together, and thus risks sinking together. Global society's psychological, social, and societal cohesion still fails to match the requirements for cooperation that it faces. As for now, humankind journeys towards humiliation at a grand scale, at micro and macro levels, if it remains a fragmented global society in a race to an ever more plundered world. This talk makes the point that it is of utmost importance that the global community learns to cooperate, so as to create a worthwhile future for the next generation. The emergence of the imagery and reality of One World represents a historic window of opportunity and hope that must be actively seized. Dignity, locally and globally, can only be achieved if humanity enivsions itself as One human family in One jointly protected world and enacts this vision. This talk advocates a global citizenship that humanizes globalization in ways that include localization in a unity-in-diversity way.

2nd International Conference on Democracy as Idea and Practice, Oslo, January 13-14, 2011 (13. jan. 2011 09:15 – 14. jan. 2011 18:00)
The conference was inter-disciplinary and primarily brought together researchers from the humanities, social sciences and law. The venue was at the University of Oslo Blindern campus.
The conference was organized with seven workshops and plenary sessions.
• Workshop 1. European Constitutional Law in the Post-National Constellation. Directors: John-Erik Fossum, Augustin José Menéndez and Inger Johanne Sand.
• Workshop 2. Organizations in Democracy and Democratization of Organizations. Directors: Fredrik Engelstad, Kari Steen-Johnsen and Eivind Falkum.
• Workshop 3. Preconditions for Democracy in the Nordic Countries 1750-1850. Directors: Hilde Sandvik and Dag Michalsen.
• Workshop 4. Constitutional Democracy: How Democratic? Directors: Eivind Smith and Bjørn Erik Rasch.
• Workshop 5. Democracy, Gender and Dignity in a Global Perspective. Directors: Øystein Gullvåg Holter and Evelin Lindner. See pictures.
• Workshop 6. Democracy and Censorship. Directors: Andreas Føllesdal and Helge Sønneland.
• Workshop 7. Practices and Experiences of Democracy in Post-Colonial Localities. Directors: Pamela Gwynne Price and Arild Engelsen Ruud.
See pictures.

World Democracy and Gender Equality: An Utopia?
Paper presented at the 2nd International Conference on Democracy as Idea and Practice, in Workshop 5 "Democracy, Gender and Dignity in a Global Perspective," led by Oystein Gullvåg Holter and Evelin Lindner, University of Oslo, Centre for Gender Research / Senter for tverrfaglig kjønnsforskning (STK), January 13-14, 2011, www.demokrati.uio.no/.

Dignity or Humiliation: The World at a Crossroad
Lecture at the Department of Psychology/Psykologisk institutt at the University of Oslo, Norway (Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3, Auditorium 1, as part of PSYC3203 – Anvendt sosialpsykologi), 12th January, 2011, 10.15-12.00. See video tape and pictures.
Please see a background paper for this lecture in the first issue of the Journal of HumanDignity and Humiliation Studies, March 2007. For an earlier version for the introductory paper, see here or http://ssrn.com/abstract=668742 (this paper's SSRN ID is 668742).
For more recent papers see, among others, "The Need for a New World," and, since this lecture was given in Norway, "What the World’s Cultures Can Contribute to Creating a Sustainable Future for Humankind," a paper prepared for the 11th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS), 23th June-1st July 2008, in Norway. The latter paper hightlights the significance of Norway and Norwegian contributions to world peace.

Fostering Global Citizenship – Welcome from the HumanDHS PresidentInvitation to Join
Introductory Presentation to the 2010 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 9-10, 2010.
This talk has two parts, related to Evelin's two roles. Her first role is to be the principal convener, together with Linda M. Hartling, of this workshop and our overall HumanDHS network. Her second role is to be one HumanDHS researcher among many. Respectively, the first part of her talk addresses the overall aim of our HumanDHS work (see here a transcription), while the second part gives a very brief introduction to her theory of humiliation. She uses a particularly broad lens, both with respect to the length of history she includes (entire human history), as well as with respect to its transcultural and transdisciplinary approach. Her theory highlights how globalization is interlinked with new and unprecedented psychological dynamics (among others, the emerging significance of the phenomenon of humiliation) that call for novel solutions at all levels – macro, meso, and micro levels, and in all fields of of inquiry and implementation into public policy.
Please see early versions of the second part, Humiliation in a Globalizing World: Does Humiliation Become the Most Disruptive Force? here or at http://ssrn.com/abstract=668742 (this paper's SSRN ID is 668742); see for a more recent version the first issue of the Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, March 2007.
Please see also a paper presented at the 2009 workshop: The Need for a New World.
See, furthermore, papers written during the year 2010 for the for the book Psychological Components of a Sustainable Peace, edited by Morton Deutsch and Peter Coleman. (The titles of the chapters, and most section headings in each chapter were suggested by Morton Deutsch. The text of each section attempts to respond to its heading.)
• Fostering Global Citizenship, Paper 3, October 15, 2010
• Why Global Citizenship Is Needed for Global Peace, Paper 2, May 30, 2010
• Harmonious and Sustainable Peaceful Relations: How They Can Be Fostered by Fulfilling Basic Human Needs and Nurturing Positive Emotions and How the Frustration of Basic Needs Can Lead to Destructive Emotions and Interactions, Paper 1, February 25, 2010.

Gender, Humiliation, and Global Security
December 8, 2010, 4-5:30 pm, Russell 306, Book presentation in Gottesman Library, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City. See the book.

Understanding and Addressing Humiliation and Conflict
December 2, 2010, 12-2.30 pm, Brown Gag Lunch at the UN Interagency Framework Team for Preventive Action, convened at the United Nations, New York City, U.S.A., organized by Gay Rosenblum-Kumar
See the 2010 picture.
This talk connects back to "Humiliation, Conflict management, and Policy Making," brown bag lunch at the Governance and Public Administration Branch, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, on December 15, 2004.
Dr. Evelin Lindner will speak about about honor, dignity, and humiliation as themes that are salient for conflict and conflict transformation at the individual micro level as much as at the macro level in relation to political and other forms of violence in the world. From domestic violence and bullying in schools to the economic crisis and global terrorism, honor and dignity are being hurt in many ways and on many levels. What makes Lindner's approach interesting is that she uses a large-scale geo-historical lens to understand these dynamics.
The human rights ideal of equality in dignity for all is historically rather recent and represents a profound shift in the ways humiliation is being defined and felt. To give a particularly stark example for practitioners in the field of conflict resolution, it is crucial for them to have a deep understanding of how a person feels who defends humiliated family honor with so-called honor killing, and why another person is appalled and convinced that honor killing represents a case of double humiliation rather than a remedy. As path out of this conundrum, Lindner advocates the principle of unity in diversity, the "Gandhi way" of respecting-but-not-appeasing, or the "Mandela way" of understanding-but-not-condoning.

Understanding and Addressing Humiliation (2)
December 2, 2010, 8-10 am, organized by Maria Volpe at her monthly breakfast meeting (since 9/11 on the first Thursday of each month) at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City. See the 2010 pictures.
This is a continuation of Lindner's first contribution on December 7, 2006, please see the Crisis Intervention News of 2006 and the 2006 picture.
Evelin Lindner speaks about honor, dignity, and humiliation as themes that are salient at the individual micro level as much as at the macro level. From domestic violence and bullying in schools to the economic crisis and global terrorism, honor and dignity are being hurt in many ways and on many levels. What makes Lindner's approach unique is that she uses a large-scale geo-historical lens to understand these dynamics. The human rights ideal of equality in dignity for all is historically rather recent and represents a profound shift in the ways humiliation is being defined and felt. To give a particularly stark example, for practitioners in the field of conflict resolution, it is crucial to have a deep understanding of how a person feels who defends humiliated family honor with so-called honor killing, and why another person is appalled and convinced that honor killing represents a case of double humiliation. As path out of this conundrum, Lindner advocates the principle of unity in diversity, the "Gandhi way" of respecting-but-not-appeasing, and the "Mandela way" of understanding-but-not-condoning.

(Ære)krenkelse (humiliation) – utgangspunkt for konflikt
Kurs i konfliktløsning, fredskultur og flerkulturell forståelse (Course in conflict resolution, culture of peace, and cross-cultural understsanding), 5.- 8. juli 2010, ved Nordland Akademi for Kunst og Vitenskap, Melbu, Vesterålen, Norway. Organised by Ingeborg Breines. See the invitation to the course, and the annual Sommer-Melbu festivalen.
See pictures.

The Role of Dignity for Gender Relations
Lecture given in the course for Master's Degree students in Gender Studies (Master in formatori e Esperti in pari opportunità. Women's studies e identità di genere) of Professor Francesca Brezzi at the University Roma Tre in Rome, Italy, on 7th May 2010.
See pictures.

The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Sociology
Lecture given in the Ph.D. course Teoria e Ricerca Sociale (Theory and Social Research) of Professor Maria Immacolata Macioti at the University La Sapienza in Rome, Italy, on 5th May 2010.
See pictures.

The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Moral Philosophy
Lecture given in the course on Moral Philosophy with Professor Francesca Brezzi at the University Roma Tre, Italy, on 4th May, 2010.
See pictures.

From Shock to Awe: The World on a Trajectory from Humiliation to Dignity – A List of “Factoids”
Paper prepared for the 15th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS), 28th-30th April 2010, in Istanbul, Turkey.
See pictures.

The Relevance of Dignity and Humiliation for Peace Research
Lunch presentation at the International Peace Research Institute, Oslo/Institutt for fredsforskning, PRIO (Hausmanns gate 7, invited by Kristian B. Harpviken and Henrik Syse), 15th January 2010, 12.00-13.30.
In her talk, Lindner presents the transdisciplinary theory on humiliation that she has developed since 1997. She highlights the significance of peace research for the theory of humiliation and shows how humiliation can undermine peace defined through unity in diversity, globally as much as locally, but also how its destructive potential can be channeled in more constructive ways.
See pictures.

Dignity or Humiliation: The World at a Crossroad
Lecture at the Department of Psychology/Psykologisk institutt at the University of Oslo, Norway (Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3, as part of PSYC3203 – Anvendt sosialpsykologi), 13th January 2010, 10.15-12.00. See video tape and pictures.
Please see a background paper for this lecture in the first issue of the Journal of HumanDignity and Humiliation Studies, March 2007. For an earlier version for the introductory paper, see here or http://ssrn.com/abstract=668742 (this paper's SSRN ID is 668742).
For more recent papers see, among others, "The Need for a New World," and, since this lecture was given in Norway, "What the World’s Cultures Can Contribute to Creating a Sustainable Future for Humankind," a paper prepared for the 11th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS), 23th June-1st July 2008, in Norway. The latter paper hightlights the significance of Norway and Norwegian contributions to world peace.
See pictures.

The Role of Anthropology for Theorizing Dignity and Humiliation: How Global Humiliation Affects the Citizens of Increasingly Diversified Societies
Lecture at the Cultural Complexity in the New Norway (CULCOM) programme at the Department of Social Anthropology/Sosialantropologisk institutt at the University of Oslo, Harriet Holters hus, 2nd floor, invited by Thomas Hylland Eriksen and Elisabeth Eide, 11th January 2010, 14.00-16.00.
In this lecture, Lindner presents the transdisciplinary theory on humiliation that she has developed since 1997. She highlights the significance of the field of anthropology for the theory of humiliation and shows how humiliation can undermine unity in diversity, globally as much as locally, but also how its destructive potential can be channeled in more constructive ways.
See pictures.

Invitation to Join: Introductory Presentation to the 2009 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 10-11, 2009.
This talk has two parts, related to Evelin's two roles. Her first role is to be the principal convener of this workshop and our overall HumanDHS network, together with Linda. Her second role is to be one HumanDHS researcher among many. Respectively, the first part of her talk addresses the overall aim of our HumanDHS work (see here a transcription), while the second part gives a very brief introduction to her theory of humiliation. She uses a particularly broad lens, both with respect to the length of history (entire human history) she includes, as well as with respect to its transcultural approach. Her theory highlights how globalization is interlinked with new and unprecedented psychological dynamics (unprecedented significance of the phenomenon of humiliation) that call for novel solutions at all levels – macro, meso and micro levels, and in all fields of public policy.
Please see early versions of the second part, Humiliation in a Globalizing World: Does Humiliation Become the Most Disruptive Force? here or at http://ssrn.com/abstract=668742 (this paper's SSRN ID is 668742); see a more recent version in the first issue of the Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, March 2007.
Please see also a new paper: The Need for a New World, and see also the video-taped lecture Dignity or Humiliation: The World at a Crossroad, held at the Department of Psychology at the University of Oslo, Norway.

Invitation to Join: Introductory Presentation
Introductory lecture given at the 13th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS), Honolulu, Hawaii, 20th – 23rd August 2009.
Please see also a new paper: The Need for a New World, and see also the video-taped lecture Dignity or Humiliation: The World at a Crossroad, held at the Department of Psychology at the University of Oslo, Norway.

Dignity or Humiliation: Introductory Presentation
Presentation in "Creating Change Together," the 2009 Hollyhock Summer Gathering, Hollyhock, Cortes Island, BC, Canada, July 26 – 31, 2009. See pictures.
Please see also a new paper: The Need for a New World, and see also the video-taped lecture Dignity or Humiliation: The World at a Crossroad, held at the Department of Psychology at the University of Oslo, Norway.

The "Prisoner’s Testament" Peace Award
Each year, Aktive Fredsreiser – Travel for Peace awards the following: Fangenes Testamente (The Prisoner’s Testament) and Blanche Majors Forsoningspris (Blanche Majors Reconciliation Award) in order to shine the spotlight on individuals and organisations that have contributed to peace making processes and to conflict resolution.
Evelin Lindner received this award in 2009 and the entire Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies network is deeply honored!
•  Innføring i arbeidet med verdighet og ydmykelse, 19th June 2009, Fredshuset (Peace House), Risør, Norway
•  Takketale ved overrekkelsen av prisen Fangenes Testamente
("lecture expressing gratitude"), 20th June 2009, Fredshuset (Peace House), Risør, Norway

Dignity or Humiliation: The World at a Crossroad
Lecture at the Department of Psychology/Psykologisk institutt at the University of Oslo (Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3, Auditorium 1, as part of PSYC3203 – Anvendt sosialpsykologi), given on 14th January, 2009. Audience: full auditorium with 56 persons.
Please see a background paper for this lecture in the first issue of the Journal of HumanDignity and Humiliation Studies, March 2007. For an earlier version for the introductory paper, see here or http://ssrn.com/abstract=668742 (this paper's SSRN ID is 668742).
For more recent papers see, among others, "The Need for a New World," and, since this lecture was given in Norway, "What the World’s Cultures Can Contribute to Creating a Sustainable Future for Humankind," a paper prepared for the 11th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS), 23th June-1st July 2008, in Norway. The latter paper hightlights the significance of Norway and Norwegian contributions to world peace.
See pictures and video.

Invitation to Join: Introductory Presentation to the 2008 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 13-14, 2008.
This talk has two parts, related to Evelin's two roles. Her first role is to be the principal convener of this workshop and our overall HumanDHS network, together with Linda. Her second role is to be one HumanDHS researcher among many. Respectively, the first part of her talk addresses the overall aim of our HumanDHS work (see here a transcription), while the second part gives a very brief introduction to her theory of humiliation. She uses a particularly broad lens, both with respect to the length of history (entire human history) she includes, as well as with respect to its transcultural approach. Her theory highlights how globalization is interlinked with new and unprecedented psychological dynamics (unprecedented significance of the phenomenon of humiliation) that call for novel solutions at all levels – macro, meso and micro levels, and in all fields of public policy.
Please see early versions of the second part, Humiliation in a Globalizing World: Does Humiliation Become the Most Disruptive Force? here or at http://ssrn.com/abstract=668742 (this paper's SSRN ID is 668742); see a more recent version in the first issue of the Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, March 2007.
Please see also a new paper, prepared for this workshop: The Need for a New World

Disasters As a Chance to Implement Novel Solutions that Highlight Attention to Human Dignity
Contribution to the International Conference on Rebuilding Sustainable Communities for Children and Their Families after Disasters, convened by Adenrele Awotona at the College of Public and Community Service University of Massachusetts at Boston, U.S.A., November 16-19, 2008, as facilitator/moderator for the session "Disasters and Innovative Solutions," on Tuesday, November 18, 4:15pm-6:15pm (2 hours including Q&A time).
Panel participants:
1. Disasters As a Chance to Implement Novel Solutions that Highlight Attention to Human Dignity: Evelin Lindner
2. Some Strategies for the Promotion of Human Dignity for Rebuilding Sustainable Communities after Disasters: Ravi Katherashala
3. Social and Economic Mobility for the Roma in Hungary: A Look at Government Initiatives and International Responses: Nichole Fiore
4. Lessons to Learn: Roles of Government, Private Sector and NGOs in Disaster Reconstruction in Fragile States and Impoverished Communities: Julia A. Demichelis
See all abstracts and presenters.
Please see "Conference Examines Ways to Rebuild after Disasters" on page 5 of the University Reporter for an article about the conference. It makes reference to Lindner's contribution.
See pictures.
•  Abstract: The sustainability of social cohesion and ecological survival for humankind requires a focus on human dignity, implemented with a mindset of cooperation and humility, rather than disrespect and humiliation. Evelin G. Lindner, a social scientist with an interdisciplinary orientation, is the Founding Director and President of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS), a global transdisciplinary fellowship of academics and practitioners who wish to promote dignity and transcend humiliation. The idea for this network emerged in 2001, and has since grown to ca. 1,000 personally invited members from all over the world, with the website being read by ca. 40, 000 people from 183 countries per year. HumanDHS researchers and practitioners attempt to create public awareness for the destructive effects of humiliation, and to promote alternative approaches that generate and embody human dignity and respect. The central human rights message is expressed in Article 1 of the of the Human Rights Declaration, which states that every human being is born with equal dignity (and ought not be humiliated). This ideal requires concerted action to be implemented, not just in the field of legal regulations, but in every sphere of human life, including architecture and the way we create our built environments, and including disaster management. After disasters, communities are prone to suffer violations of dignity in numerous ways. However, disasters can also open space for the implementation of novel solutions that highlight attention to human dignity. For example, victims of disasters can be encouraged to become co-creators of interventions, rather than merely recipients of help – research indicates that help can have humiliating effects. Since disasters disrupt established life, they even entail the potential to open more space for empowerment than was present prior to the event – this can occur, for example, when women are given more visibility than they had before. Disasters unmask in stark ways the short-comings of human interventions in general, be it with regard to management philosophies (in case of disasters, for example, how aid is being delivered), or how housing is designed (in the case of disasters, for example, how emergency shelters are being built), or how short-term and long-term planning is interwoven (in the case of disasters, whether humanitarian emergency aid is being integrated with longer-term development goals). Many short-comings are related to a lack of attention to human rights, not just their legal aspects, but the spirit of human rights, namely equality in dignity for all. Human interventions in society in general, as well as approaches to disaster intervention, often stem from times when sensitivity to the notion of equality in dignity was still weak. Sometimes this lack of sensitivity is overtly visible, at other times notions such as “expertise,” “efficiency,” or “practicability,” cover up for or “justify” violations of human rights and human dignity. ... International organizations, accustomed to responding to emergencies and developmental needs, must develop concepts of efficiency and practicability that nurture inclusive and dignifying diversity. Today the term mainstreaming permeates many discourses: The spirit of human rights, the emphasis on human dignity, needs to be mainstreamed also in disaster management.

See the book that has been the result of this conference:
Disasters As a Chance to Implement Novel Solutions that Highlight Attention to Human Dignity
In: Awotona, Adenrele (Ed.), Rebuilding Sustainable Communities for Children and their Families after Disasters: A Global Survey, proceedings of the International Conference on Rebuilding Sustainable Communities for Children and Their Families after Disasters, convened by Adenrele Awotona at the College of Public and Community Service University of Massachusetts at Boston, U.S.A., November 16-19, 2008, published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing (Newcastle), and as e-book by MyILibrary (LaVergne, TN), 2010.

Dignity or Humiliation: The World at a Crossroad
Lecture at the Department of Psychology/Psykologisk institutt, Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3, Telefon 22845000, Auditorium 1 (part of PSYC3203 – Anvendt sosialpsykologi), University of Oslo/Universitetet i Oslo, 30th September 2008, 10.00-12.00. Please see early versions of this introductory talk/paper here or at http://ssrn.com/abstract=668742 (this paper's SSRN ID is 668742); see a more recent version in the first issue of the Journal of HumanDignity and Humiliation Studies, March 2007.

What the World’s Cultures Can Contribute to Creating a Sustainable Future for Humankind
Paper prepared for the 11th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS), 23th June-1st July 2008, in Oslo, Norway.

The Relevance of Humiliation Studies for the Prevention of Terrorism
Paper presented to the NATO Advanced Research Workshop ‘Indigenous Terrorism: Understanding and Addressing the Root Causes of Radicalisation among Groups with an Immigrant Heritage in Europe,’ Budapest, Hungary 7-9th March, 2008. Please see pictures. See here a long first draft of the paper.

Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies: An interview with Dr. Evelin Gerda Lindner, Gaialogue with Joanna Harcourt-Smith
Future Primitive, February 9, 2008.
Transdisciplinary social scientist and founding director of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, a global fellowship of concerned academics and practitioners whose vision is to serve as a global enabling platform, giving space and encouragement to people who wish to dignify our world and transcend humiliation.
Listen to the MP3 file of the interview.

Introduction to Dignity and Humilition
Lecture given on December 13, 2007, at the 2007 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 13-14, 2007. See a transcription of the first part of this talk.
This talk had two parts, related to Lindner's two roles. Her first role is to be the principal convener of this workshop and our overall HumanDHS network, together with Linda Hartling. Her second role is to be one HumanDHS researcher among many other HumanDHS researchers. Respectively, the first part of her talk addressed the overall aim of our HumanDHS work, while the second part gave a very brief introduction to her theory of humiliation. She uses a particularly broad lens, both with respect to the length of history (entire history of Homo sapiens) she includes, as well as with respect to its transcultural approach. Her theory highlights how globalization is interlinked with new and unprecedented psychological dynamics (unprecedented significance of the phenomenon of humiliation) that call for novel solutions at all levels – macro, meso and micro levels, and in all fields of public policy.
Please see early versions of the second part, Humiliation in a Globalizing World: Does Humiliation Become the Most Disruptive Force? here or at http://ssrn.com/abstract=668742 (this paper's SSRN ID is 668742); see a more recent version in the first issue of the Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, March 2007.

Workshop "Dynamics of Humiliation in a Globalizing World"
The Kurt Lewin Center, in Bethel, Maine, U.S.A., November 2007 (postponed).
Lecturer: Evelin Lindner and Linda Hartling, in a collective effort with Edie and Charles Seashore, together with all participants, supported by Martha Manning.

Genocide, Humiliation, and Conflict
Center for Judaic, Holocaust and Peace Studies, Appalachian University, Boone, North Carolina, U.S.A., November 10 – 14, 2007.
Guest lecturer Evelin Lindner, invited by Amy Hudnall, Adjunct Instructor, Coordinator of Peace Studies, supported by Jennifer Kirby.
Genocide, Humiliation, and Conflict
Carol Grotnes Belk Library and Information Commons at Appalachian State University, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2007, at 7 p.m. in Room 114.
On a Personal Level, Genocide, Its Relationship to Humiliation, and How to Prevent It in the Future
Genocide Class (freshman ) of Amy Hudnall, Adjunct Instructor, Coordinator of Peace Studies, Center for Judaic, Holocaust and Peace Studies, Appalachian University, Boone, North Carolina, U.S.A., November 13, 2007.
The Role of Humiliation in the Holocaust, Germany and Rwanda
Holocaust class of Rennie Brantz, Professor of History, Co-Director of the Center for Judaic, Holocaust, and Peace Studies, Appalachian University, Boone, North Carolina, U.S.A., November 13, 2007, organized by Amy Hudnall.
The Role of Humiliation in Ethnic Conflicts
Ethnic Conflict Class (junior level seminar class) of Anatoly V. Isaenko, Ph.D., Associate Professor at the Department of History, Appalachian University, Boone, North Carolina, U.S.A., November 12, 2007.
Please see pictures.

The Theory of Humiliation and Its Application
Course PSYC32 03, Anvendt sosialpsykologi, Universitet i Oslo, Psykologisk institutt, Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3, Aud 3, 16. oktober 2007. Please see picture.

Humiliation
Course PSYPRO 4030, kull 24, in the Series Social Psychological Theory and Method, Department of Psychology, room 12.405, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway, 8th – 11th October 2007. Please see pictures.

New Developments in Psychology: Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies
Psychology Department, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, convened by Winnifred Louis, Professor of Psychology, August 29th 2007, 4-5pm in Room 306 of the McElwain (psychology) building. Please see pictures.
Abstract: This seminar is about humiliation, globalization, human rights, and dignity. The central question is the following: Could it be the case in a globalizing world in which people are increasingly exposed to human rights advocacy, that acts of humiliation and feelings of humiliation emerge as the most significant phenomena to resolve? This seminar suggests that this is the case. It claims that the citizens of this world share a common ground, namely a yearning for recognition and respect that connects them and draws them into relationships. The seminar argues that many of the observable rifts among people may stem from the humiliation that is felt when recognition and respect are lacking. The seminar proposes that only if the human desire for respect is cherished, respected, and nurtured, and if people are attributed equal dignity in this process, can differences turn into valuable diversities and sources of enrichmentboth globally and locally instead of sources of disruption.

The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Peace & Conflict Studies
Australian Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies (ACPACS), The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, Don Carruthers Room, Level 5, Dorothy Hill PSE Library, Hawken Building (50), at K5 co-ordinates, 14th of August 2007, 12:00-14:00 pm. Please see pictures.

How Intercultural Communicators Can Contribute to Realizing Humiliation-Free Global Peace
Guest lecture at the SIETAR Japan Kansai Chapter's June Meeting, 2007, Takatsuki Shiritsu Sogo Shimin Koryu Center, Osaka, Japan, 17th June, 2007. Please see pictures.

Getting Acquainted with Humiliation Studies
Guest lecture at the course of Intercultural Communication Theory, by Adair Linn Nagata, at the Graduate School of Intercultural Communication, Rikkyo University, 26th April 2007.

Intercultural Communication and Humiliation
Guest lecture at Seminar for Communication Studies, the School of International Politics and Economics, Aoyama Gakuin University, invited by Professor Kiyoko Sueda, Tokyo, Japan, 24th April 2007.

The "Framing Power" of International Organizations, and the Cost of Humiliation
Paper given at the Interactive Workshop on "Collaborative Learning Environment Characterised by Mutual Respect" at the Department of Applied Psychology, Xixi Campus, Hangzhou, China, 16th April 2007.
The idea for this workshop evolved after the guest lecture given by Lindner at a workshop for graduate students, organised by Professor Hora Tjitra on the occasion of Lindner's visit to the Department of Applied Psychology, Zhejiang University, School of Psychology, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China, 13th April 2006. The title of her talk was: The Role of Dignity and Humiliation in a Globalising World: New Forms of Cooperative Approaches to Solve New Social Dilemma Situations as well as Succeed in Intercultural Encounters
•  Please see here Reflections on Feedback from the Audience by Lindner.
•  Please see also some pictures.

How Multicultural Discourses Can Help Construct New Meaning
Paper prepared for the Second International Conference on Multicultural Discourses, 13 – 15th April 2007, followed by the 9th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, Institute of Discourse and Cultural Studies, and Department of Applied Psychology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, 15th April 2007. Please see pictures.

The Transition of the Link Between Humiliation and Mental Health: From Due Lowliness to Undue Humiliation
Lecture at the International Mental Health Professionals of Japan (IMHPJ) conference on March 17 – 18, 2007, in Kawaguchiko at Mount Fuji. Please see pictures.
Please see also International Mental Health Professionals in Japan: Challenges and Opportunities, by Carolyn Zerbe Enns, PhD & Jim McRae, PhD, International Mental Health Professionals Japan (IMHPJ), in Psychology International (May-June 2007).

Humiliation
Course PSYPRO 4030, kull 23, in the Series Social Psychological Theory and Method, Department of Psychology, room 12.405, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU),Trondheim, Norway, 29th January – 2nd February 2007.

Psychological factors in Euro-Arab Relations
Lecture as part of the pilot course Young Swedish Muslim Peace Agents, 19th – 27th January 2007, at the Swedish Institute, with Director Jan Henningsson, in Alexandria, Egypt, 57, 26 July, Avenue Mancheya Corniche, 22nd January 2007, 15.30-17:30. Please see pictures.

How Human Rights Abuses Humiliate, and the Consequences for Development and Peace
Lecture as part of the Course Refugees and Migrants, and a Rights-based Approach to Development, 8th-18th January 2007, organised by Professor Barbara Harrell-Bond, Distinguished Visiting Professor in Forced Migration and Refugee Studies at the American University in Cairo, Egypt, at the Jameel Centre Auditorium, Greek Campus, AUC, Wednesday, 17th January 2007, 16.00-17.30. Please see pictures.

Humiliation in a Globalizing World: Does Humiliation Become the Most Disruptive Force?
This talk and paper were first prepared for the "Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict," November 18-19, 2004, at Columbia University, but in various versions also given in the subsequent workshops in 2005, and 2006.
Please see the full paper here or at http://ssrn.com/abstract=668742 (this paper's SSRN ID is 668742).

On Understanding and Addressing Humiliation
Contribution to Maria Volpe's monthly breakfast meeting (since 9/11 on the first Thursday of each month) at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City, December 7, 2006. Please read the Crisis Intervention News and see pictures.

Humiliation as Strongest Force Endangering Peace: Peace Education's Responsibility to Address Humiliation
Conversation at the Peace Education Center at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City, NY, November 30, 2006, 3:30-5:00 pm, room 285 Grace Dodge.

Humiliation and the Roots of Violence: Human Conflict in a Globalizing World
Presentation at The New Jersey Center for Character Education, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey & The New Jersey Commission on Holocaust Education, New Jersey Department of Education, Center for Applied Psychology, Rutgers, The State University, Piscataway, New Jersey, November 14, 2006, 3:30 – 5:00 pm, Lecturer: Evelin Lindner, invited by Philip Brown. Please see pictures.

Auswirkungen von Demütigung auf Menschen und Völker
Vortrag aus Anlass der 3. Verleihung des SBAP. Preises in Angewandter Psychologie, verliehen vom Schweizerischen Berufsverband für Angewandte Psychologie SBAP an Evelin Lindner, (lecture awarded by the Swiss Association of Applied Psychology to Evelin Lindner, Auditorium Maximum, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETHZ), Main Building, Rämistrasse 101, 8006 Zurich, Switzerland, Thursday, 19th October 2006. Please see more details and many pictures.

Ydmykelsens betydning
Foredrag ved direktoratet for utviklingssamarbeid (NORAD, Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation, under Utanriksdepartementet (UD), Informasjonssenteret, Ruseløkkveien 26, Oslo, 10.00-12.30, 13th October 2006.

Ydmykelses rolle: Intervju med Aase Cathrine Myrtveit
Intervju med Aase Cathrine Myrtveit for NRK (Norsk rikskringkasting / Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation) Radio P2, Verdibørsen, opptak 13. oktober 2006, kringkasting 14. og 15. oktober 2006.

How Can We Reduce the Effects of Humiliation?
Lecture at Norges Fredsråd (Norwegian Peace Council), Oslo, 11th October, 2006, 17.00-19.30.

Ydmykelse og konflikt
Forelesning i Anvendt psykologi for fjerde semester Sosialpsykologi, Profesjonsstudiet, ved Reidar Ommundsen, Universitetet i Oslo, Psykologisk institutt, 10. oktober 2006, 10:15-12.00 / Lecture in Applied Psychology for 4th Semester Social Psychology, University of Oslo, Department of Psychology, 10th October 2006. This lecture was also given in 2005 and 2004.

Humiliation
Course PSYPRO 4030 Autumn 2006, kull 22, Series Social Psychological Theory and Method, Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway, 2nd – 6th October 2006.

Humiliation in a Globalising World
Lindner, Evelin Gerda (2006). Humiliation in a globalising world. San José, Costa Rica: Lecture at the 7th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, United Nations-mandated University for Peace, San José, 6th – 9th September 2006.

Avoiding Humiliation – From Intercultural Communication to Global Inter-Human Communication
Society for Intercultural Education, Training and Research (SIETAR) Japan lecture, 9th June 2006, 7:00-9:00 pm,
Reitaku University, Tokyo Kenkyu Center (Shinjuku i-Land Tower, 4th Floor). Please see here a draft for the lecture for your comments. Please click here to see pictures.
Program Description on SIETAR Japan Program Announcement for June 2006: Dr. Evelin Lindner inscribes the notion of pride, honor, dignity, humiliation, and humility into current historic and cultural transitions, identifying 2 current forces in world affairs. She will discuss how identity building and global inter-human communication are necessaryto avoid possible destructive effects from humiliation.
Presenter: Dr. Evelin Gerda Lindner is a well-known, committed, and multidisciplinary advocate for humanity in a global society. Her work on the effects of humiliation on individuals and communities has made a significant contribution to the study of peace. The founder of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies global network, Dr. Lindner is affiliated, among others, with the University in Oslo. She will be publishing her latest book in June.

Avoiding Humiliation – From Intercultural Communication to Global Inter-Human Communication
Guest lecture at the the course of Intercultural Communication Theory, by Adair Linn Nagata, at the Graduate School of Intercultural Communication, Rikkyo University, 8th June 2006.

Locating the Researcher in Time and Space: What Led Me to Do Research on Humiliation and International Conflict
Lecture in the "Interpersonal Communication" class organized by Jacqueline Howell Wasilewski, Professor in Intercultural Communication, Division of International Studies, International Christian University, Tokyo, Japan, 8th June 2006.

The Role of Dignity and Humiliation in a Globalising World: New Forms of Cooperative Approaches to Solve New Social Dilemma Situations As Well As Succeed in Intercultural Encounters
Workshop for graduate students, organised by Professor Hora Tjitra on the occasion of Evelin Lindner's visit to the Department of Applied Psychology, Zhejiang University, School of Psychology, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China, 13th April 2006.

Humiliation
Course PSYPRO 4030 Spring 2006, kull 21, Series Social Psychological Theory and Method, Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway, 27th February – 3rd March 2006.

Humiliation in a Globalizing World: Does Humiliation Become the Most Disruptive Force?
Keynote lecture on December 15, 2005, at the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 15 – 16, 2005.

Globalization, Human Rights, Terrorism, and Humiliation
Lecture at the Program on Global Security and Cooperation of the Social Science Research Council (SSRC), New York City, invited by Bernice Ortega, December 6, 2005.

Globalization, Human Rights, Conflict, and Humiliation
Guest lecture given at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, Solomon Asch Center for Study of Ethnopolitical Conflict, invited by Clark McCauley, November 28, 2005.

Ydmykelse og konflikt
Forelesning i Anvendt psykologi for fjerde semester Sosialpsykologi, Profesjonsstudiet, ved Reidar Ommundsen, Universitetet i Oslo, Psykologisk institutt, 18. oktober 2005 / Lecture in Applied Psychology for 4th Semester Social Psychology, University of Oslo, Department of Psychology, 18th October 2005. This lecture was also given in 2006 and 2004.

Human Dignity and Humiliation
Course PSYPRO 4030 Autumn 2005, kull 20, in the Series Social Psychological Theory and Method, Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway, 10th – 14th October 2005.

Æreskoder, ydmykelse og menneskerettigheter
Presentasjon ved Norsk senter for menneskerettigheter, Universitet i Oslo, invitert av Nils Butenschøn, 30. september 2005.

Gender and Life Designs in a Global Perspective: What are 'Dignified' Life Designs, and When Do We Feel Humiliated?
Guest lecture at the the course of Intercultural Communication Theory, by Adair Linn Nagata, at the Graduate School of Intercultural Communication, Rikkyo University, 28th June 2005.

Humiliation in a Globalizing World: Does Humiliation Become the Most Disruptive Force?
Course organized by Sayaka Funada-Classen, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, Tokyo, Japan, 12th May 2005.

Gender and Life Designs in a Global Perspective: What are 'Dignified' Life Designs, and When Do We Feel Humiliated?
Course organised by Kazuko Tanaka, Founder of the Center for Gender Studies at the Division of International Studies, International Christian University, Tokyo, Japan, 10th May 2005.

Design of Personal Life and Global Society, Dignity and Humiliation
Lecture in the "Intercultural Decision-Making" class by Jacqueline Howell Wasilewski, Professor of Intercultural Communication, Division of International Studies, International Christian University, Tokyo, Japan, 10th May 2005.

Life Design, Dignity and Humiliation
Lecture in the "Course in Advanced Studies in Communication" by Jacqueline Howell Wasilewski, Professor of Intercultural Communication, Division of International Studies, International Christian University, Tokyo, Japan, 9th May 2005.

On the Theme of Humiliation
Course PSY 4030 Spring 2005, in the Series Social Psychological Theory and Method, Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway, 12th – 14th January 2005.

Conflict Resolution and the Psychology of Humiliation
Course ORLJ 4859 Fall 2004, 1-credit, 3 days, Columbia University, Teachers College, International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (ICCCR), New York City, U.S.A., November 12 – 14, 2004.

The Role of Humiliation for Conflict in a Globalizing World
Foredrag ved Redd Barna, 14. oktober 2004.

Studies of Humiliation
Course PSYPRO 4030 Autumn 2004, Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), 8th October 2004.

Humiliation, Conflict, and Enthusiasm
Foredrag ved Studenter for Årets TV-askjon, Chateau Neuf, Oslo 15. oktober 2004.

Ydmykelse og konflikt
Forelesning i Anvendt psykologi for fjerde semester Sosialpsykologi, Profesjonsstudiet, ved Reidar Ommundsen, Universitetet i Oslo, Psykologisk institutt, 5. oktober 2004 / Lecture in Applied Psychology for 4th Semester Social Psychology, University of Oslo, Department of Psychology, 5th October 2004. This lecture was also given in 2006 and 2005.

The Theory of Humiliation
Lecture on 16th September 2004, at the 3rd Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, Maison des Sciences de l'Homme, Paris, 16th – 18th September 2004.

The Role of Humiliation in Conflict and War
Guest lecture at the the course of Intercultural Communication Theory, by Adair Linn Nagata, at the Graduate School of Intercultural Communication, Rikkyo University, Tokyo, Japan, 9th June 2004.

The Role of Humiliation in Conflict and War
Guest lecture at June-July program of the Maison Franco-Japonaise (www.mfj.gr.jp), Tokyo, Japan, 8th June 2004.

Interview to Commemorate Rwanda, Ten Years On
Paris: BBC World Service Radio, World Today programme, 1st April 2004.

Humiliation, Violence, and Gender
Lecture at "Women and Children in Criminal Justice System," School of Social Work at Hebrew University in Jerusalem, invited by David Bargal, March 11, 2004.

Humiliation, Violence, and Gender
Lecture at the "MADA gender group," Al Quds University in Abu Dies in Jerusalem, March 12, 2004.

Ydmykselsens psykologi, et fremtidsperspektiv
Falstad, Trøndelag, Norway: Foredrag ved Falstadseminaret 2003: “Ydmykelse – et menneskerettighetersanliggende?,” 9. oktober 2003.

Theory of Humiliation: Cross-Cultural, Gender, and International Dimensions of Conflict
New York: Presentation at the New York University (NYU), Silver Center, July 17, 2003.

The Psychology of Humiliation
Ramat Hasharon, Israel: Presentation given at the Evening Event of the Israel Center for Mind-Body Medicine, invited by its Director Nimrod Sheinman, November 13, 2003.

The Politics of Humiliation
Presentation on June 8, 2003, at the course "Designing and Implementing Interventions for Global Change," convened by Virginia Swain, United Nations, New York City, July 7 – 11, 2003.

Humiliation and the Roots of Violence
Presentation at the University of Trondheim (NTNU), Department of Psychology, Trondheim, Norway, 8th October 2003.

Conflict Resolution and the Psychology of Humiliation
Course ORLJ 4859A Summer, Section 001, 3-credit, 5 days, Columbia University, Teachers College, International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (ICCCR), New York City, U.S.A., June 6 – 8, and June 21 – 22, 2003.

Peace and the Dynamics of Humiliation: What Can Be Done?
Guest lecture, 18th October 2002.
In this guest lecture the author's work on humiliation carried out during the past five years has been presented.

Menneskelige relasjoner – læring uten ydmykelse
Foredrag ved 'Livslang og livsvid læring konferanse', Royal Christiania Hotel, Oslo, 18. oktober 2002.
In this presentation Lindner attempted to make her research on humiliation accessible to an audience of people who hold positions related to education in society at large.

Fra ydmykelse og hevn til tilgivelse og forsoning
Foredrag ved 'Agenda utredning & utvikling' konferansen, Oslo, 14. oktober 2002.
In this day-seminar Lindner attempted to make her research on humiliation accessible to an audience of people who advise society at large, be it as consultants to the corporate sector or to public administration.

Humiliation and Conflict
Applied Social Psychology Curriculum, Psykologisk institutt, Universitetet i Oslo, 15. oktober 2002.
In this presentation Lindner invited the students into her research on humiliation with the aim to further reflection on how research in social psychology may be both relevant and timely for current social predicaments, and how it could be methodologically anchored.

Humiliation and Conflict
Social Psychology Curriculum, Norges teknisk-naturvitenskaptelige universitet (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway, 11. oktober 2002.
In this presentation Lindner invited the students into her research on humiliation with the aim to further reflection on how research in social psychology may be both relevant and timely for current social predicaments, and how it could be methodologically anchored.

Ydmykelsens psykologi
Foredrag ved Falstadseminaret 2002: 'Rettsoppgjør og forsoning: Menneskeverd i etterkrigstid', Falstad, Trøndelag, Norway, 9. oktober 2002.
In October 1941, Falstad special school for handicapped boys was taken over by the German occupying power and transferred into SS Strafgefangen-enlager Falstad, a detention camp for political prisoners. Later, Russian POW's were imprisoned here together with Yugoslav partisans and Polish forced labourer's. The camp contained prisoners from 13 countries during the War years. A total of 5000 prisoners were registered at Falstad. Today the The Falstad Memorial and Centre for Human Rights organises a yearly seminar. Stein Ugelvik Larsen, Erik Solheim and Evelin Lindner held talks in the 2002 seminar. Furthermore a documentary film was shown. In this film three former prisoners (who were present in person during the seminar) described how humiliation was the most hurtful pain they suffered. In Lindner's presentation she attempted to link her personal family history (not least as a gesture of humility to the victims present) to her research on humiliation and tragedies such as the Holocaust and Falstad.

Conflict Resolution and the Psychology of Humiliation
Course ORLJ 4859A Summer, Section 001, 1-credit, Columbia University, Teachers College, International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (ICCCR), New York City, U.S.A., June 14 – 15, 2002.

Conflict Resolution and the Psychology of Humiliation
Workshop for ICCCR trainers and doctoral students, International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (ICCCR), Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City, U.S.A., June 19, 2002.
This workshop (one afternoon) covered the role played by the phenomenon of humiliation in the context of topics such as cooperation and competition, negotiation and mediation, trust, violence, power, culture and inter-group conflict.

Conflict and Humiliation
Session in the discussion series "Seeing Coexistence" organized by the The Coexistence Initiative and The International Trauma Center at New York University, New York City, U.S.A., June 25, 2002.
This presentation covered the role played by the phenomenon of humiliation in the context of topics such as cooperation and competition, negotiation and mediation, trust, violence, power, culture and inter-group conflict.

Humiliation and the Roots of Violence
Teachers College, Columbia University, December 17, 2001, 3.30 pm, upon the invitation of Betty Reardon, attended, among others, by Morton Deutsch.

Peace and the Dynamics of Humiliation: What Can Be Done?
Lecture at the seminar on "Conflict Resolution in Developing Countries. What Are the Donors Trying to Do? What about Indigenous Conflict Resolution Techniques?" University of Oslo, 23rd March 2001.
In this talk, the summary of the four-year research project on humiliation (1997-2001) was presented, together with policy relevant recommendations as to how the current transition from hierarchical societal structures that include routine humiliation to human rights based structures that oppose the application of humiliation, can be conceptualised, and how this conceptualisation may help promoting peace.

Peace and the Dynamics of Humiliation: What Can Be Done?
Foredrag ved 'Fredsseminar', Oslo, 16. februar 2001.
In this talk, the summary of the four-year research project on humiliation (1997-2001) was presented, together with policy relevant recommendations as to how the current transition from hierarchical societal structures that include routine humiliation to human rights based structures that oppose the application of humiliation, can be conceptualised, and how this conceptualisation may help promoting peace.

Om kulturforståelse og hvordan kulturforskjeller kan stimulere til kreativitet
Foredrag ved Maritim Foredrag ved Personellkonferanse, Oslo, 3. oktober 2001.
I dette foredraget blir kulturforskjeller og kultursynergier kartlagt og strategier blir presentert som den enkle kan benytte seg av for å bedre samhandle med mennesker fra forskjellige kulturbakgrunn. Dessuten blir forståelse fremmet for at kulturforskjell kan benyttes til å skape kreativitet.

Peace and the Dynamics of Humiliation: What Can Be Done?
Foredrag ved Alfred – fredsfestival 'Konfliktløsning i fagperspektiv', Oslo, 7. desember 2001.
"Peace and the dynamics of humiliation: What can be done?" var Lindner's selvvalgte emne for en av hennes prøveforelesninger for hennes Dr. psychol.-grad. Over en fireårsperiode har Lindner arbeidet med ydmykelsens rolle og prosjektet "The Feeling of being Humiliated" har foregått ved UiO i perioden 1997-2001. Emnet har mange innlysende men også mange mer skjulte aspekter, og spiller en svært sentral rolle i militære konflikter. Lindner har arbeidet med fokus på konfliktene i Somalia, Rwanda/Burundi og Tyskland under Hitler. For å belyse sakene fra flere perspektiver er representanter fra tre grupper intervjuet; partene i konflikten, samt en tredje part. En rekke kvalitative intervjuer foretatt i Somalia, Rwanda og Burundi, områder som kan fortelle om tre ulike kulturer og tre ulike folkemord. Intervjuer fant også sted i Egypt, Kenya, Norge, Tyskland, Frankrike og Belgia. Lindners prosjekt har vært banebrytende på mange måter, med et innovativt forhold mellom individ og grupper, karakterisert ved ydmykende handlinger eller respekt, som grunnleggende element. Også i metode er Lindner utfordrende og spennende. Hun har arbeidet ut fra en metodologisk mix bestående av kulturell psykologi, sosial psykologi og antropologi, samt historie, filosofi og litteraturanalyse.

Intervju med Christian Rafn
Nærradio, 8. desember 2001.

Samtale med en verdensborger
Bidrag til 'Bokkafe på søndager', Hovin Bokkafe, Oslo, 5. mai 2000.
The research project about humiliation in its connection with genocide was introduced on the background of my personal biography and experience in travelling under difficult circumstances.

Theoretical Perspectives on Humiliation and Traumatization
Lecture at the conference 'Traumatization, Stress Reactions and Coping', University of Trondheim (NTNU) Lade, Department of Psychology, 9th March 2000.
The starting point of this presentation was World War II and its alleged roots in humiliation after World War I. The need to study this social-psychological line of thought was emphasised. Examples of humiliation were presented, with the aim to illustrate the complexity of this notion. A graphical illustration, built on Lakoff's use of spatial metaphor, was introduced. It was highlighted that the term humiliation underwent a significant historic change, and that it has very diverse cultural connotations, from humiliation in a context of blood revenge of duel on one side, to the violation of the inner core of dignity through subtle mobbing on the other side. It was suggested that the act of humiliation was and is a routine procedure in coercive hierarchies, – an in this context supposedly 'normal,' 'healthy' and 'legitimate' means to maintain this hierarchy – while in modern human rights based societies humiliation is seen as illegitimate and 'unhealthy' (mobbing, bullying, etc.). The term humiliation has thus 'moved into' the term of trauma.

'Afrika / borgerkrig / fornedrelse': Interview with Eva Christine Hyge
NRK (Norsk rikskringkasting / Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation) Radio utenrikssendingen, 'Verden på lørdag', program 2, 5. februar 2000, 11.03 -12.00.
In the NRK utenrikssendingen 'Verden på lørdag' ('The World on Saturday'), channel 2, 11.03 -12.00 on 5th February 2000, the research project 'The Feeling of Being Humiliated: A Central Theme in Armed Conflicts' was presented under the special heading 'Afrika / borgerkrig / fonedrelse' ('Africa / Civil War / humiliation'). Genocides as happened in Rwanda in 1994 were addressed in their relation to humiliation. Furthermore inequality and poverty, both globally and locally, were identified as source of humiliation and its potential aftermath of hatred and violence. Lytt til lydfilen.

Det gode liv
NRK (Norsk rikskringkasting / Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation) Radio P2, 'Sånn er livet', 6. oktober 1997.