2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict
representing the
Sixth Annual HumanDHS Conference

December 15-16, 2005
New York, Columbia University, Teachers College, 525 West 120th Street
(subway 1, exit 116th Street)

Morton Deutsch, Honorary Convenor

morton

Two-day Workshop:
• 
Thursday, December 15, 2005, room 179 Grace Dodge
•  Friday, December 16, 2005, room 285 Grace Dodge
•  Public Event on Thursday evening, December 15, 2005, Milbank Chapel

Please see:
•  Newsletter Nr. 6, compiled subsequent to this workshop
•  This workshop is the second one in a series that began in 2003:
see the 2004 workshop and a compilation of all NY workshops
•  Videos
•  the Conference Notes of Day One
•  the Conference Notes of Day Two


• Our Workshops on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict are convened by ICCCR - International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution, with Morton Deutsch, its Director Emeritus, as our Honorary Convener,
on behalf of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) as part of the
Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN). We are very grateful to our hosts!
• We thank Kathryn Crawford for so kindly arranging room 179 Grace Dodge, Milbank Chapel, and room 285 Grace Dodge for our workshop!
• To request disability-related accommodations and equipment, please contact OASID at oasid@tc.edu, (212) 678-3689, (212) 678-3853 TTY, (212) 678-3854 video phone
• This Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict has been made possible by a generous contribution from the Slifka Foundation (please see the HumanDHS' Work: Objectives and Evidence of Success, developed in cooperation between HumanDHS and ABSF in 2006)

Please click here or in the middle of the picture to see all the pictures from Evelin's camera.
(Important note to our conference particants: During our conference, we asked for your permission to be posted here, however, if you have changed your mind since, either in total or for specific pictures, please let us know! Thank you! Since we wish to walk the talk of dignity, it is very important for us to do our utmost in respecting everybody's privacy. We refrain from gathering written permissions from you during our conferences, since we value the building of mutual trust in relationships, and we also would like to refrain from contributing to an ever more bureaucratic and legalistic society.)

Please see two pictures from Judy Kuriansky's camera! See Neil Ryan Walsh, Judy Kuriansky, and Evelin Lindner at the public event/reception in the Columbia University Teachers College Milbank chapel, and a view of one of the roundtable sessions!


Our Workshop Had two Parts:

•  Public Event - Everybody Is Warmly Invited to Come!
Thursday, December 15 2005, 5.30 pm – 8.00 pm,
Columbia University, Teachers College, Milbank Chapel

Please see here the videos of this evening:
We began with Neil Ryan Walsh singing for us, then Linda Hartling welcomed everybody, then Morton Deutsch spoke, and after him David Hamburg. He was followed by Maria Volpe and Evelin Lindner, the Founding Manager of HumanDHS.
The videos were taken by Judy Kuriansky.
•  This is part 1 of the entire video. What you see here, are the preparations for the evening. Neil is practicing his singing and Evelin is trying to make the video projector and microphones work.
•  This is part 2 of the entire video. Neil Ryan Walsh sings
•  This is part 3 of the entire video. Linda Hartling welcomes everybody
•  This is part 4 of the entire video. Morton Deutsch speaks (first 10 minutes)
•  This is part 5 of the entire video. Morton Deutsch speaks (second 10 minutes)
•  This is part 6 of the entire video. David Hamburg speaks (first 10 minutes)
•  This is part 7 of the entire video. David Hamburg speaks (second 10 minutes)
•  This is part 8 of the entire video. David Hamburg speaks (third 10 minutes)
•  Maria Volpe's talk is still being processed.

•  Workshop
Thursday and Friday, December 15-16, 2005
(Thursday 10.00 am - 5.30 pm, Friday 10.00 am - 5.30 pm)
Columbia University, Teachers College, 525 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027,
Thursday, December 15, in room 179 Grace Dodge,
Friday, December 16, in room 285 Grace Dodge.
This part of our workshop was not public.

•  Where to stay!
Everybody arranged for housing here.
We thank Tony Jenkins for allowing us to use this link!

•  Please kindly note that...
• There is no registration fee for our conferences. To cover our expenses, we always summarize the costs during the conference and invite participants to contribute according to their ability. This collaborative approach to financing allows us to keep the conference affordable for all.
• We like to get to know participants prior to our conferences and workshops, and prior to issuing an invitation.
• All our gatherings are by invitation only, please approach us so that we can include you and register you. Only our Public Events are open to everybody without registration.
• The Non-Public Parts of our gatherings have limited enrollment.
• Participants are encouraged to find their own sources of funding or economic support to participate in our conferences. We offer our nurturing work as our gift of love and care to you, ad we
would like to lovingly invite everybody to contribute to this gift economy. If you need funding for your travels and housing, please inquire in your country and your university about possibilities. See, among others, for the US, www.supportcenter.org and www.foundationscenter.org. The Weinstein International Fellowship program, inaugurated in 2008, provides opportunities for individuals from outside the United States to visit the U.S. to learn more about dispute resolution processes and practices and to pursue a project of their own design that serves to advance the resolution of disputes in their home countries.
• Participants are kindly asked to handle all of their travel arrangements and required documentation, including requests for visas, on their side. HumanDHS is a volunteer initiative and does not have staff or resources to assist with visa requests.

•  Permissions
During our conferences, we always ask all participants for their permission to have their pictures or videos posted on our website, however, if you change your mind later, either in total or for specific pictures/videos, please let us know! Thank you! Since we wish to walk the talk of dignity, it is very important for us to do our utmost in respecting everybody's privacy. We refrain from gathering written permissions from you during our conferences, since we value the building of mutual trust in relationships, and we also would like to refrain from contributing to an ever more bureaucratic and legalistic society.

•  What happened in our previous meetings?
Please see newsletter 4 of summer 2005, as well as newsletter 5, subsequent to our Berlin meeting in September 2005, as well as newsletter 6, subsequent to our 2005 NY workshop.

 


•  Rationale
•  How We Go About
•  Frame
•  List of Conveners
•  Public Event: Everybody was warmly invited!
See videos!
•  Program
(Day One & Day Two)
•  Round Table 1: What's relevant in a destructive conflict? (Day One)
•  Round Table 2: Is humiliation relevant in destructive conflict? (Day One & Two)
•  Round Table 3: Can the notion of humiliation be useful for public policy planning? (Day Two)
•  List of Participants
•  Details of the Convening Organizations
•  Papers
•  Pictures of our 2004 meeting
•  Pictures 2004 with Morton Deutsch
•  Newsletter 3, written as report subsequent to our 2004 NY workshop
•  Newsletter 4, written in summer 2005
•  Newsletter 5, written as report subsequent to our 2005 Berlin meeting
•  Newsletter 6, written as report subsequent to our 2005 NY meeting
•  Pictures of our 2005 meeting (from Evelin's camera)
•  Pictures of our 2005 meeting (from Judy Kuriansky's camera)
•  the Conference Notes of Day One (thanks to Tonya et al.!)
•  the Conference Notes of Day Two (thanks to Tonya et al.!)



 

Rationale, Methodology, and Frame

 

Rationale

Given the current context of the field of international conflict, the impact of emotions on conflict has become one of the most important questions worldwide. However, there are only scattered publications in the research and applied literature that would address issues on conflict and emotion directly, as well as their relations and their impact on public policy.

The first two-day workshop was held at Teachers College, Columbia University, in 2004, hosted by the Columbia University's Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN), with special help from SIPA – Center for International Conflict Resolution (CICR) and the International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (ICCCR).

CICR on behalf of CU-CRN and HumanDHS invites selected groups of scholars, counselors, conflict resolution practitioners, mediators, and teachers among other professions for the two-day workshops to explore issues of conflict and emotions and its application to actual negotiations and diplomacy. The aim is to particularly probe the role of the notion of humiliation from the two different angles of conflict and emotion.

The meetings are envisaged as a learning community gathering, interactive and highly participatory. The purpose is to create an open space to identify and sharpen our understanding of the discourse and debate on emotion and conflict and the role that might, or might not be played by humiliation within this field. We continue this effort in our follow-up workshops.

We see humiliation as entry point into broader analysis and not as "single interest scholarship." We are aware that most participants focus on other aspects than humiliation in their work and have not thought about humiliation much, or even at all. We do not expect anybody to do so beforehand. We would love that everybody comes with his/her background, his/her theoretical concepts and tools, and that we, during the conference, reflect together. We invite everybody to use their focus and give a thought to whether the notion of humiliation could be enriching, or not, and if yes, in what way. We warmly invited diverging and dissenting views.

How We Go About

In our meetings, we choose a dialogical methodology that stresses interaction and participation, because we wish to create an atmosphere of openness and respectful inquiry through Round Tables and, when appropirate, the use of Open Space Technology. We believe that notions such as dignity and respect for equal dignity are important not only for conflict resolution, but also for meetings such as our workshops. The name Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies attempts to express this. We wish to strive for consistency between what we think are important values for conflict resolution, and the way we conduct our work and our meetings.

Every Round Table is opened by brief remarks by each participant to present their entry points into the inquiry. In order to facilitate feedback, we are asking that papers/notes are sent in to us in advance. We wish to make available your brief synopsis of 1 to 4 pages, with references, prior to the workshop through this site so that all participants can meet virtually before meeting in person. Longer papers are welcome as well both prior and subsequent to our workshops, not least for the envisaged publications of the results of our meetings.

Victoria C. Fontan has kindly taken upon her the task to develop edited books (with the help of Christopher Santee, Linda Hartling, Arie Nadler, and Evelin Lindner) starting with the contributions of the participants of our Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict in 2004. Please see Violent Conflict and Humiliation. Victoria C. Fontan has furthermore kindly taken upon herself the responsibility of being the editor of our journal. Please notify us, if you wish to submit any of your papers either as a book chapter or as a journal article.

All participants are warmly invited to send in their papers as soon as they can.

Frame

by Linda Hartling, Ph.D., Associate Director, Jean Baker Miller Training Institute, Wellesley College, Boston, USA

In our meetings we aim at creating a humiliation-free, collaborative learning environment characterized by mutual respect, mutual empathy, and openness to difference. The perspective of "appreciative enquiry" is a useful frame of our work. Our HumanDHS efforts are not just about the work we do together, but also about HOW WE WORK TOGETHER. At appropriate points during our meetings, for example at the end of each day, we take a moment to reflect on the practices observed that contributed to an appreciative/humiliation-free learning experience.

It is important to emphasize that an appreciative approach is not about expecting people to agree. In fact, differences of opinion enrich the conversation and deepen people's understanding of ideas. Perhaps, this could be conceptualized as "waging good conflict," which means practicing radical respect for differences and being open to a variety of perspectives and engaging others without contempt or rankism. As we have seen in many fields, contempt and rankism drains energy away from the important work that needs to be done. Most people only know "conflict" as a form of war within a win/lose frame. "Waging good conflict," on the other side, is about being empathic and respectful, making room for authenticity, creating clarity, and growth.

Please read An Appreciative Frame: Beginning a Dialogue on Human Dignity and Humiliation, that Linda has written for us in 2005.

 



List of Conveners

Evelin Gerda Lindner, Medical Doctor, Clinical and Social Psychologist, Ph.D. (Dr. med.), Ph.D. (Dr. psychol.), Organizer of the HumanDHS Conferences, Supporting the Local Conveners

Evelin G. Lindner is the Founding Director and President of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS). She is a transdisciplinary social scientist, affiliated with the Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network, New York, the University of Oslo, Norway, Department of Psychology (folk.uio.no/evelinl/), and the Maison des Sciences de l'Homme, Paris. Lindner is also an Associate Professor at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim, Department of Psychology, Norway, and teaches globally, including in South East Asia, the Middle East, Australia, Africa, and other places globally. [read more]

Linda M. Hartling, Ph.D., Social Psychologist, Organizer of the HumanDHS Conferences, Supporting the Local Conveners

Linda M. Hartling, Ph.D., is the Associate Director, Jean Baker Miller Training Institute, Wellesley College, Boston, USA. She is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, HumanDHS Global Core Team, HumanDHS Global Coordinating Team, HumanDHS Research Team, and HumanDHS Education Team. She is the Editor of the Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (JHDHS).
Linda is affiliated with the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMTI) at the Stone Center, which is part of the Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College in Massachusetts. Until 2008, she was its Associate Director. Dr. Hartling is a member of the JBMTI theory-building group advancing the practice of the Relational-Cultural Theory, which is a new model of psychological development. In addition, Dr. Hartling coordinates and contributes to training programs, publications, and special projects for the JBMTI. She holds a doctoral degree in clinical/community psychology and has published papers on resilience, substance abuse prevention, shame and humiliation, relational practice in the workplace, and Relational-Cultural Theory. [read more]
Please see:
• Humiliation: Real Pain, A Pathway to Violence, the draft of Linda's paper for Round Table 2 of our 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York.
Humiliation: Assessing the Impact of Derision, Degradation, and Debasement, first published in The Journal of Primary Prevention, 19(4): 259-278, co-authored with T. Luchetta, 1999.
• Shame and Humiliation: From Isolation to Relational Transformation, the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMIT), Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College No. 88, Wellesley, MA 02481, co-authored with Wendy Rosen, Maureen Walker, Judith V. Jordan, 2000.
• Humiliation and Assistance: Telling the Truth About Power, Telling a New Story, paper prepared for the 5th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies 'Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People', in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.

Andrea Bartoli, Ph.D.

Andrea Bartoli is the Director of the Center for International Conflict Resolution (CICR); Chairman of the Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN). Andrea Bartoli has a Principle Host Place on the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board. He was a significant force behind this workshop series from its start.

 


 

Program

Day One, Thursday, December 15, 2005


9.15 am Registration Starts

10.00 am Welcoming All Participants

Andrea Bartoli, Ph.D., Director of the Center for International Conflict Resolution (CICR) and Chairman of the Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN) welcomed the participants.

Donald C. Klein and Linda M. Hartling set the frame of our meetings within "Appreciative Enquiry" and we create a list of agreed upon norms having to do with the nature and tone of our dialogue. Please read An Appreciative Frame: Beginning a Dialogue on Human Dignity and Humiliation, that Linda has written for us in 2005.
Linda always keeps our workshop together with her continuous caring interventions, while Don's caring wisdom always saves our meetings in crucial moments!
We would also like to thank Becca for untiringly taking the notes of our 2004 and 2005 meeting, and Tonya Hammer for editing the notes of our 2005 meeting!

10.15 am Participants Introduced Themselves

 

11.00 am -11.30 pm Introductory Presentation: Humiliation in a Globalizing World: Does Humiliation Become the Most Disruptive Force?

Evelin G. Lindner, Founder of HumanDHS
This talk highlighted how globalization is interlinked with new and unprecedented psychological dynamics that call for novel solutions at all levels - macro, meso and micro levels, and in all fields of public policy.
Please see the full paper here or at http://ssrn.com/abstract=668742 (this paper's SSRN ID is 668742)

11.30 am -1.00 pm Section 1 of Round Table 1: What's Relevant in Destructive Conflict?


Moderators: Beth Fisher-Yoshida & Miriam Marton

We liked the Round Table discussion format we first used in our 2004 NY meeting. Everyone has ca. 5 minutes to present their entry point into the discussion, then we have an open discussion. We have 2 empty chairs in the circle that can be taken by participants from the audience who wish to introduce a question or comment.
We also liked the experience from last year with two moderators for each Round Table. In that way, the moderators are not prevented from also being participants. While one moderator makes a contribution as a participant, the other takes over, and vice versa. With only one moderator, s/he would not be so flexible.

Participants:

•  Morton Deutsch
Destructive Conflict and Oppression
(2004)

•  David Hamburg
Education and Humiliation (2005)
Learning to Live Together (2004)

•  Shibley Telhami
History and Humiliation (2003)
Unfortunately, Shibley Telhami had to cancel in the last moment

•  Andrea Bartoli
Deconstructing International Deadly Conflicts (2004)

•  Maria Volpe
The Association for Conflict Resolution Crisis Intervention online newsletter featured this presentation in its 2006 February issue.

•  Kjell Skyllstad
From Humiliation to Empowerment: Creative Conflict Management in the Multi-ethnic School (2005)

•  Sara Cobb
"Humiliation" as Positions in Narratives: Implications for Policy Development (2004)

Last year, 2004:
Moderator: Beth Fisher-Yoshida
Participants in Round Table 1, 2004: Morton Deutsch, Andrea Bartoli, Beth Fisher-Yoshida, Heidi and Guy Burgess, Philip Brown, Lourdes Quisumbing, Hroar Klempe, James E. Jones, Roberta L. Kosberg, Joshua Weiss,  Susan L. Podziba

Heidi and Guy Burgess kindly sent us a message (December 13, 2005) updating us on the fascinating progress of their work!

1.00 pm -1.45 pm Catered Lunch

1.45 pm -3.15 pm Section 2 of Round Table 1: What's Relevant in Destructive Conflict?


Moderators: Beth Fisher-Yoshida & Miriam Marton

Participants:

•  Carlos Sluzki
- Elements of Humiliation-Shame Dynamics for Computational Modeling and Analysis of Real-Life Scenarios (2004)
- The Story of the Crying Composer told at the Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, NY, 2004.
- Humiliation Therapeutics (powerpoint presentation, 2004)

•  Anie Kalayjian
Turkish Denial of the Genocide of Armenians, Greeks, Assyrians: Transforming Humiliation into Understanding and Forgiveness (2005)

•  Annette A. Engler
Displaced Identity and Humiliation in Children of Vietnam Veterans (2005)

•  James Edward Jones
The Third Force: A Practical, Community-Building: Approach to Settling Destructive Conflicts (2004)

•  Moira Rogers
Humiliation and Human Strength: Stories of African-Spanish Migrations (2005)

•  Patricia Rodriguez Mosquera
Humiliation and Honor (2005)

• Ana Ljubinkovic
From Violent to Subtle Humiliation: Case of Somali Victims of UNOSOM Living in the Refugee Camps in Kenya (2005)
Is Hope the Last to Die? (2005)

Report on Field Research Conducted in Dadaab Refugee Camps (16.05.05 - 01.06.05) (2005)

3.15 pm - 4.45 pm Section 1 of Round Table 2: Is Humiliation Relevant in a Destructive Conflict?

 
Moderators: Judith Thompson & Manas Ghanem

Participants:

•  Linda M. Hartling
Humiliation: Real Pain, A Pathway to Violence (2005)

•  Bertram Wyatt-Brown
Honor, Shame, and Iraq in American Foreign Policy (2004)

•  Maggie O’Neill
Humiliation, Social Justice and Ethno-mimesis (2005)

•  Zahid Shahab Ahmed
Refugees in South Asia and Humiliation (2005)

•  Victoria C. Fontan
The Dialectics of Humiliation: Polarization between Occupier and Occupied in Post-Saddam Iraq (2003)
Unfortunately, Victoria had to cancel in the last moment

•  Jean Berchmans Ndayizigiye
Humiliation and Violent Conflicts in Burundi (2005)

•  Judy Kuriansky
Psychosocial Aspects of the Israeli/Palestinian Conflict (2005)

Last year, 2004:
Moderators: Carlos E. Sluzki & Donald C. Klein
Participants in Round Table 2, 2004: Carlos E. Sluzki, Donald C. Klein, Linda M. Hartling, Paul A. Stokes, Bertram Wyatt-Brown, Peter T. Coleman, Jennifer Goldman, Gay Rosenblum-Kumar, Aurora Deuss, Evelin G. Lindner, Victoria Firmo-Fontan

4.30 pm - 5.00 pm Wrapping up the Closed Part of Our Workshop

 

5.30 pm - 8.00 pm Public Reception at Milbank Chapel with Eminent Scholars and Leading Thinkers.
Everybody Was Invited!

•  5.30-6.00 pm Reception
We Had Refreshments! We Mingled and Met!

Judy Kuriansky kindly captured everything with her video camera!
Please see here part 1 of the entire video. What you see here, are the preparations for the evening. Neil is practicing his singing and Evelin is trying to make the video projector and microphones work.

A Journey through Song: The Way of the Human Voice

Neil Ryan Walsh focused our minds and prepared us for the talks that followed, with three a capella songs that spoke to the topic of our workshop by expressing respect for cultural diversity (altogether 6 minutes).

Please see here part 2 of the entire video, Neil Ryan Walsh singing.

•  Linda Hartling Welcomed Everybody, part 3 of the entire video

 

•  6.00 pm - 6.30 pm Honored Presentation Oppression and Humiliation

Morton Deutsch, Columbia University
Please see his paper Destructive Conflict and Oppression
1. How shall we define "oppression" and "humiliation?"
2. Is there a natural sense of injustice?
3. What is the pathological nature of the relationship between the
oppressor and the oppressed?
4. How did Nelson Mandela successfully resist being humiliated when
he was a prisoner?
5. What are some strategies for overcoming oppression?

Please see here part 1 of Morton Deutsch's talk (first 10 minutes)
Please see here part 2 of Morton Deutsch 's talk (second 10 minutes)

•  6.30-7.30 pm Panel & Discussion

15 minute presentations by panelists followed by an open discussion with all of the evening speakers, which includes Morton Deutsch

 

•  Education and Humiliation

David Hamburg

Please see here part 1 of David Hamburg's talk (first 10 minutes)
Please see here part 2 of David Hamburg's talk (second 10 minutes)
Please see here part 3 of David Hamburg's talk (third part, yet to be completed)

•  History and Humiliation

Shibley Telhami
History and Humiliation (2003)
Unfortunately, Shibley Telhami had to cancel in the last moment

•  Conflict and Humiliation: The Simplicities of Reversing Destructive Conflict

Maria Volpe

The Association for Conflict Resolution Crisis Intervention online newsletter featured Maria's presentation in its 2006 February issue.
The video of Maria Volpe's talk is still being processed.

•  Final Thoughts by Evelin Lindner

•  8.00 pm End of our Public Event!




Day Two, Friday, December 16, 2005

 

10:00 am Welcome

 

Stephanie Heuer displayed her book that was inspired by our 2004 Paris annual meeting: I Feel Like Nobody When.I Feel Like Somebody When...

Our vision of our work is that people use it as a platform for their own creativity and initiative. Stephanie is the impressive example of somebody who takes ideas, imbues them with wonderful creativity and then has the personal independence, strength and dedication to come up, single-handedly, as a strong actor, with a product that reaches beyond the original idea in specific ways.

10.30 am - 11.15 am The Humiliation Dynamic: Looking Back... Looking Forward

Donald Klein, Union Institute and University, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. Donald Klein is a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and Global Core Team. He is furthermore the Director of our Education Team.

11.15 am - 12.45 pm Section 2 of Round Table 2: Is Humiliation Relevant in a Destructive Conflict?

 
Moderators:Judith Thompson & Manas Ghanem

Participants:

•  Jennifer Goldman
A Theoretical Understanding of How Emotions Fuel Intractable Conflict: The Case of Humiliation (2005, together with Peter T. Coleman)

•  Anne Wyatt-Brown
A Woman in Berlin: The Complexity of Humiliation at the End of World War II (2005)

•  Floyd Webster Rudmin
Six Research Designs on Humiliation (2005)

•  Anthony Abiodun Olowoyeye
Africa, a Trigger in the Explosion of International Terrorism: A Critical Analysis of The "Apparatus" of Terrorism and its Causes (2005)
Unfortunately, Anthony could not come

•  Imelda Deinla
The Effects of Humiliation on the Economic, Socio-cultural Rights and Access to Justice of Muslim Women in Mindanao (2005)
Unfortunately, Imelda had to cancel in the last moment

•  Miriam Marton
The Dual Humiliation of Female Refugees by Sexually Violent, Gender-based Acts (2005)

•  Sophie Schaarschmidt
Cognitive and Emotional Ingroup-identification of Youth in Israel and Palestine (2005)

12.45 pm -1.30 pm Catered Lunch

 

1.30 pm - 3.00 pm Section 1 of Round Table 3: Can the Notion of Humiliation Be Useful for Public Policy Planning? What Can We Envisage As Best Practice Models?

Francisco Gomes de Matos has developed a sociolinguistic checklist with the aim to identify how humiliation is communicated in daily life, so as to create a database that can be used by policy planners who attempt to diminish and end humiliating practices. Please see Communicative Humiliation: A Sociolinguistic Checklist (2005).

Moderators: Annette Engler, Ana Ljubinkovic & Miriam Marton

Participants:

•  Alan B. Slifka
Developing a Survey with the Aim to Create a Humiliation Index for Every Country (2005)

•  Howard Zehr
Humiliation, Crime and Justice (2005)

•  Kjell Skyllstad
From Humiliation to Empowerment: The Arts in Retributive and Restorative Justice (2005)

•  Grace Feuerverger
The "School For Peace": A Conflict Resolution Program in a Jewish-Palestinian Village
(2005)

•  Gay Rosenblum-Kumar
Horizontal Inequality and Humiliation: Public policy for disaffection or cohesion? (2005)

•  Mercedes St. Elin
Dignity-Humiliation in the Case of Internally Displaced Persons in Latin America: The Examples of Colombia, Guatemala, Peru and Mexico (2005)

•  Judith Thompson
Compassion, Dignity and Peace Education: A Case Study from Children of War, Inc. (2005)

Last year, 2004:
Moderators: Donald C. Klein & Linda Hartling
Participants in Round Table 3, 2004: Donald Klein, Linda Hartling, Daniel L. Shapiro, Arie Nadler, Richard Slaven, Neil Altman, Brigid Donelan, Patricia O'Hagan, Kathleen Modrowski, Shulamit Koenig, Elisabeth Scheper, Duke Duchscherer

3.00 pm - 3.15 pm Pause

 

3.15 pm - 4.45 pm Section 2 of Round Table 3: Can the Notion of Humiliation Be Useful for Public Policy Planning? What Can We Envisage As Best Practice Models?

 

Moderators: Annette Engler, Ana Ljubinkovic & Miriam Marton

Participants:

•  Philip Brown
Reflections on Policy and Humiliation: Addressing the Needs of Poor Minority Children in New Jersey’s Public Schools (2005)

•  Merle Lefkoff
When the Butterfly Flaps Her Wings in Gaza (2005)

•  Rina Kashyap
The Subversion of the Colonial System of Humiliation: A case study of the Gandhian Strategy (2005)

•  Virginia Swain, in cooperation with Sarah Sayeed (only Thursday)
Reconciliation as Policy: Moving Beyond the Victim-Perpetrator Lens in the United Nations Secretariat and Member States (2005)
Unfortunately, Virginia had to cancel in the last moment

• 
Myra Mendible
Mediated Humiliations: Spectacles of Power in Postmodern Cultur
(2005)

•  Ariel Lublin
Addressing Humiliation through Listening with Respect: A Restorative Justice Model for Victims, Offenders, and Law Enforcement (2005)

•  Neil Altman
Humiliation, Retaliation, and Violence, in Tikkun Magazine, January/February 2004
Only Friday

5.00 pm - 5.30 pm Conclusion




 

List of Participants

•  Morton Deutsch, Director Emeritus & E.L. Thorndike Professor Emeritus, International Center for Cooperation & Conflict Resolution, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, USA. Morton Deutsch has a Principle Host Place on the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
His paper from our 2004 workshop, Oppression and Conflict, was first presented at the Interrupting Oppression and Sustaining Justice Working Conference at ICCCR, NY, February 27-29, 2004. Please see here his Foreword to Lindner's Book on Humiliation.

•  David A. Hamburg is President Emeritus of Carnegie Corporation of New York. David A. Hamburg is a Member on the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
David A. Hamburg kindly wrote (June 28, 2005): I appreciate very much your invitation to participate in your conference December 15-16, 2005, at Columbia University, Teachers College. I would, indeed, like to attend. I was not able to do so previously. I am not sure I can be there both days, but at least for one.
I am certainly interested in the basic question your raise as to whether humiliation is relevant to destructive conflict. By the same token, I am interested in the question whether humiliation can be useful in formulating public policy, as well as the matter of best practice models. You challenge all of us in the conflict field in a most constructive way. So, please keep me posted, and I look forward to what will undoubtedly be an important occasion. David.

•  Shibley Telhami, Anwar Sadat Professor for Peace and Development at the University of Maryland, USA. Shibley Telhami is a Member on the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board. Professor Telhami has written a piece on "History and Humiliation," in The Washington Post, Friday, March 28, 2003, and has written about humiliation in The Stakes: America and the Middle East (Westview Press, 2003; updated version, 2004) which was selected by Foreign Affairs as one of the top five books on the Middle East in 2003.
Shibley Telhami kindly wrote (June, 14, 2005): Dear Evelin: I will do my best to attend your meeting and already have it on my calendar. I hope you are doing well. Best, Shibley.
Unfortunately, Shibley Telhami had to cancel in the last moment.

•  Alan B. Slifka, New York investment manager and philanthropist, founder of the Coexistence Initiative (Brandeis University). His topic is Feeling at Home, Or Not, Depending on Humiliation (2005).

•  Jennifer Goldman, International Center for Cooperation & Conflict Resolution, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, USA. Jennifer Goldman is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team and the Research Team.
Please see here her work on humiliation, together with Peter Coleman: How Humiliation Fuels Intractable Conflict: The Effects of Emotional Roles on Recall and Reactions to Conflictual Encounters, work in progress, Teachers College, Columbia University, 2005.
Jennifer kindly wrote (June 16, 2005): I support the idea of connecting the theory with practical application, and urge us to think about how what we’re researching and writing about can be applied in real world settings. It could be helpful for us to choose one or a few real world situations that are relevant for people’s work (for example, the situation at Abu Ghraib; or on-going problems of humiliations occurring at national and international boundaries, i.e. airport and road checkpoints in all parts of the world, from the U.S., to Tibet/China, to Israel/Palestine; or workplace-based humiliation) and use the examples to ground our discussions about theory and research... It could also be useful to make distinctions between different types of humiliation, such as individual-level, collective-level, etc. or humiliation that occurs within different settings, such as workplace, international, etc., and to have break-out sessions that focus on those topics.
Structurally, it could make sense to meet all day Thurs, and a half-day on Friday, so we can end on a strong note with most people in attendance on Friday (and perhaps to add an informal dinner on Wed night to extend the social time for those who could make it).
Jennifer kindly wrote (August 29, 2005): Dear Evelin, I hope you're doing well! I've done a bit of brainstorming for topics for the conference, and thought I'd forward them to you (I mentioned these to Peter and Beth as well). Best, Jennifer
Some ideas for small groups/topics for the humiliation conference:
1.
- Does culture affect how people experience humiliating events? If so, how?
- What role do collectivistic vs. individualistic cultures play in how people experience humiliating events?
- Do people's behavioral reactions to humiliation differ depending on whether the humiliation is aimed at them individually versus collectively (i.e., an affront against one's person vs. an affront against one's group)? If so, how might their behavioral reactions differ? (e.g., would one type of humiliation lead people to be respond more aggressively than another?)
2.
- What role do social norms play in how people react, emotionally and behaviorally, to humiliating events?
- What role do social norms play in how people recall, or remember, humiliating events?
3.
- To what degree is humiliation an "identity forming" emotion?
4.
- How does the construct of humiliation differ from the constructs of shame, guilt, embarrassment and other similar emotions?
5.
Methodological considerations:
- How can effective and efficient studies of humiliation be acheived through different methodologies?
- What considerations need to be taken into account when studying humiliation in the field? In the lab? In survey studies?
- How can we simulate studies on humiliation in the lab setting? What are the IRB issues involved?
Please see A Theoretical Understanding of How Emotions Fuel Intractable Conflict: The Case of Humiliation by Jennifer S. Goldman and Peter T. Coleman (2005), paper presented at Round Table 2 of our 2005 workshop.

•  Beth Fisher-Yoshida, Associate Director, International Center for Cooperation & Conflict Resolution, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, USA. Beth Fisher-Yoshida has a Principle Host Place on the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Beth kindly served as Moderator for our Round Table "What's relevant in a destructive conflict?" in last year's workshop.

•  Maria Volpe, Professor and Director, CUNY Dispute Resolution Consortium, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, The City University of New York, USA. Maria is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Maria kindly wrote (June 11, 2005): Dear Evelin....Great hearing from you. I have marked my calendar so I can participate in the Workshop this year. I am looking forward to it and seeing you again. Did you want the workshop posted on the NYC-DR listserv? Not sure if this is an event by invitation or if it is open to those who are interested. Let me know....With warmest regards, maria.
Maria gave the following presentation: Conflict and Humiliation: The Simplicities of Reversing Destructive Conflict. The Association for Conflict Resolution Crisis Intervention online newsletter featured this presentation in its 2006 February issue.

•  Donald C. Klein, Union Institute and University, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. Donald Klein is a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and Global Core Team. He is furthermore the Director of our Education Team.
Please see here Community MetaFunctions and the Humiliation Dynamic, a paper that Don presented at ou 2nd Annual Meeting on Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, Paris, France, September 16-18, 2004.
Please see also
Appreciative Psychology: An Antidote to Humiliation, a final paper Don presented at our 2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, November 18-19, 2004. Please see here also The Humiliation Dynamic: Looking to the Past and Future, the paper that Don presents at the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005. Please see also his New Years Greetings: 2006!
Don kindly wrote (July 4, 2005): Hello, Evelin -- I agree that the roundtable approach worked very well and should prove to be equally profitable at the December 2005 meeting. The Open Space approach is not something, however, that will work well if "tucked in" between scheduled sessions that have been preplanned. To be successful, Open Space requires a general over-all topic that is of interest and importance to all participants. It needs at least a full day, during which there can be three or four rounds of discussion groups on aspects of the general topic that are proposed by participants themselves. If we were to use Open Space, an overall topic that would be of great interest to me has to do with developing effective approaches to dealing with those groups and nations that inflict humiliation on other groups or nations. I'm thinking, for example, of humiliation experienced by Palestinians at Israeli hands, of Irish Catholics' experience of humiliation at Proestant Catholic hands, and of Muslim experience of humiliation at the hands of Christian nations.
I realize that the same overall topic would lend itself to a series of Round Tables similar to the approach we used last year. The Round Table approach has the advantage of making it possible to ask one or more people to develop in advance brief papers that would stimulate subsequent discussion. If one goal is to publish a book of papers and discussions froom the annual conferences, then the Round Table approach seems preferable.
Another topic that would lend itself to Round Table discussions has to do with educational approaches to reducing or eliminating humiliation and promiting human dignity, including, for example, Round Tables on creating humiliation free environments for the education of children, use of media for public education on promoting human dignity, and inter-group methods for dealing with humiliating intercommunal conflicts.
I also want to add the following possible option, suggested by Alan. If we decide to organize the conference around an Open Space Design, it would still be possible to encourage people (perhaps to get specific commitments from certain ones) to prepare working papers in advance of the conference. These papers might be circulated in advance via internet and also be available at the conference as hard copies. In this way, participants would have the chance to be informed on certain topics, which later individuals might select for the spontaneous discussion groups that are so important to the Open Space design. With love, Don.

•  Rebecca Klein, A graduate of Hampshire College, USA. Rebecca Klein is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team.
Becca is Don's daughter and very kindly maintains our internal database. She has, furthemore, with breathtaking efficiency, prepared the notes for all our past meetings.

•  Margaret Tyndall, President of NTL Institute for Applied Behavioral Science. [back to the program]

•  Sarah Proescher, Education Rights Program Coordinator, Asociacion Tepeyac de New York, NY, US.

• Linda Hartling, Jean Baker Miller Training Institute, Wellesley College, Boston, USA. Linda Hartling is a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, Global Core Team, and Education Team.
Please see here Humiliation: Assessing the Impact of Derision, Degradation, and Debasement, first Published by: The Journal of Primary Prevention, 19(4): 259-278, co-authored with T. Luchetta, 1999,
and please see also:
Shame and Humiliation: From Isolation to Relational Transformation
, the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMIT), Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College No. 88, Wellesley, MA 02481, co-authored with Wendy Rosen, Maureen Walker, Judith V. Jordan, 2000. Please see the preliminary draft of her paper for Round Table 2 of our workshop Humiliation: Real Pain, A Pathway to Violence.

•  Richard Slaven, Brandeis University, Massachusetts, USA. Richard Slaven is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and a Member of the HumanDHS Planning Committee.

•  Victoria C. Fontan, is the Director of the International Peace Studies Program at the United Nations University for Peace in San Jose, Costa Rica, since 2005. As a Fellow to the Iraq Project at the CICR in Columbia University, Victoria is in charge of developing a permanent Conflict Resolution curriculum in northern Iraqi universities.
Victoria Fontan is a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, and a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team, and the Research Team.
Victoria has kindly taken upon her the task to develop an edited book with your contributions.
Victoria is also a researcher in our upcoming Terrorism and Humiliation Project. The title of her 2008 book is Voices from Post-Saddam Iraq: Living with Terrorism, Insurgency, and New Forms of Tyranny (Westport, CT: Greenwood/Praeger Security International).
Please see furthermore The Dialectics of Humiliation: Polarization between Occupier and Occupied in Post-Saddam Iraq, unpublished draft (not to be cited without author's authorization).
Unfortunately, Victoria had to cancel in the last moment.

•  Stephanie J. Gliege, J.D., M.A., Programme Officer, Department of Int'l Law and Human Rights, United Nations University for Peace, Costa Rica, Department of International Law, UN University for Peace, San José, Costa Rica. Her paper is on cultural aspects of the intersection between human rights and human dignity. Stephanie J. Gliege is an Instructor at the Department of International Law and Human Rights at the United Nations mandated University for Peace in San Jose, Costa Rica (www.upeace.org/faculty). She is also a practicing attorney and the co-founder of The Human Dignity Project, a new non-profit organization formed with the mission to protect the inherent dignity of all people through education, research, and consulting. The Human Dignity Project is launching two programs in the coming year, one on creating a space for dialogue to discuss human dignity among young professionals and activists in Central Asia and another to write amicus briefs to courts around the world on behalf of victims of human rights violations. As the basis for the education program in Central Asia, she is preparing a paper on the intersection between human rights and human dignity in a cultural context.

•  Kjell Skyllstad, University of Oslo, Norway. Kjell Skylstad is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Kjell kindly wrote (June 9, 2005): I will come to N.Y. arriving at J.F. Kennedy on Dec. 15 and departing Dec. 17!
Please see here Creating a Culture of Peace - The Performing Arts in Interethnic Negotiations, in: Intercultural Communication, ISSN 1404-1634, November, issue 4, 2000.
Please see also From Humiliation to Empowerment: Creative Conflict Management in the Multi-ethnic School, paper presented at Round Table 1 of our 2005 Workshop, and From Humiliation to Empowerment: The Arts in Retributive and Restorative Justice, paper presented at Round Table 3.

•  Bertram Wyatt-Brown and
•  Anne Wyatt Brown, University of Florida, now Baltimore, USA. Bertram Wyatt-Brown is a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and Global Core Team.
Bert kindly wrote (May 27, 2005): My wife and I are both looking forward to coming 15-16 December. Anne Wyatt-Brown's a specialist on the Holocaust and also on aging studies and is now the editor of a new publication in that field. 
Please see here Honor, Shame, and Iraq in American Foreign Policy, note presented at our 2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, November 18-19, 2004.
Anne M. Wyatt-Brown kindly wrote (2 November, 2005): Dear Evelin, [...] I plan to talk about the book you mentioned in connection with your parents, A woman in Berlin.  I think it raises issues that need to be addressed about the relativity of humiliation experiences.  Moreover, I wonder if the behavior of her fianc is entirely caused by the loss of honor or fear of her resourcefulness.  Kenneth Kenniston talked about the difficulty American couples had post WWII when husbands returned to households which their wives had run successfully during the war.  These are issues that can be talked about and have application to other situations. Best, Anne. Please see her abstract presented at Round Table 2 of our 2005 workshop: A Woman in Berlin: The Complexity of Humiliation at the End of World War II.

•  Sara Cobb, Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution at GMU, Washington, USA. Sara Cobb is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Please see here "Humiliation" as Positions in Narratives: Implications for Policy Development, paper presented at our 2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, November 18-19, 2004. [back to the program]
• Mannal Radwan, Saudi Embassy, will accompany Sara. She wants to conduct her dissertation on humiliation.

•  Carlos E. Sluzki, George Mason University, Washington, USA. Carlos E. Sluzki is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Please see here Elements of Humiliation-Shame Dynamics for Computational Modeling and Analysis of Real-Life Scenarios, draft of presentation at the Workshop on Humilliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, November 18-19, 2004.
Please see also:
The Story of the Crying Composer
, told at the Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, NY, 2004,
and:
Humiliation Therapeutics (powerpoint presentation), developed at the Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, NY, 2004.

•  Howard Zehr, Eastern Mennonite University, Virginia, USA. Howard Zehr is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
On 09.11.2005, Howard Zehr kindly wrote: Hello Evelin [...] My orientation is criminal justice, as you know, and I believe shame/humiliation play a huge role in this arena.  I have strong reservations, though, about deliberately imposing shame in this area and my thoughts about policy would reflect this.
Please see here Humiliation, Crime and Justice, note presented at Round Table 3 of our 2005 Workshop.

•  Manas M. Ghanem, Eastern Mennonite University, Virginia, USA. Manas is a Member of the HumanDHS Research Team. Manas M. Ghanem is a researcher in our upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. The title of her project is Iraqi Refugees in Syria and Jordan & Humiliation.

•  Moira Rogers, Eastern Mennonite University, EMU, Virginia, USA. Moira Rogers is a Member of the HumanDHS Research Team. Moira is both an Academic Advisor for our upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project, and has her own project, entitled Humiliation and Human Strength: Stories of African-Spanish Migrations.
Moira kindly wrote (May 31, 2005): I would love to participate in the round tables!

•  Rina Kashyap, Chairperson, Department of Journalism, LSR, Delhi University/
Fulbright Scholar, Center for Justice and Peacebuilding, EMU, Virginia. Please see Rina's paper presented at Round Table 3, The Subversion of the Colonial System of Humiliation: A case study of the Gandhian Strategy.

•  James E. Jones, Manhattanville College, CUNY, USA. James Jones is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Jimmy Jones kindly wrote (May 27, 2005): God-willing, I plan to attend and would like to continue in the same roundtable discussing American Jewish(Zionist)-Muslim(pro-Palestinian relations.
Please see here The Third Force: A Practical, Community-Building: Approach to Settling Destructive Conflicts, note presented at our 2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, November 18-19, 2004.

•  Gay Rosenblum-Kumar, Public Administration Officer in the Governance and Public Administration Branch, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, New York, USA. Gay Rosenblum-Kumar is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Gay kindly wrote (May 26, 2005): Yes, God willing, I would like to come. Although the format worked well and the inner circle added some depth to ideas, I think I would like to see some work in smaller groups reporting back to the whole. I think this would permit more intense discussions going farther on a particular line of inquiry which could be useful to the group as a whole.
Please see here Humiliation, Conflict and Public Policy, note presented at our 2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, November 18-19, 2004. Please see Horizontal Inequality and Humiliation: Public policy for disaffection or cohesion?, note presented at Round Table 3 of our 2005 Workshop.

•  Chetan Kumar, Governance and Public Administration Branch, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, New York, USA.

•  Judy Kuriansky, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist with a Ph.D. from N.Y.U. Judy is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board. She is currently teaching in the Department of Clinical Psychology at Columbia University Teachers College, and at Columbia Medical School, where she coordinates international training programs. A Fellow of the American Psychological Association, Dr. Judy is an NGO representative to the United Nations for two international organizations - the International Association of Applied Psychology and the World Council for Psychotherapy. She works extensively throughout the world giving workshops on healthy relationship as well as on peace, tolerance and trauma recovery, including after 9'11 in America. Honored for her work after 9'11, she was featured in the Red Cross campaign, and as a spokesperson for the American consulate abroad. She has provided mental health support after disasters worldwide, like SARS in China, an earthquake in Australia, tensions in Serbia, bombings in Jerusalem, and most recently with Dr. Anie Kalayjian and the Mental Health Outreach Program in Sri Lanka after the tsunami. They co-moderated a workshop, "Achieving Collective Security:  Partnerships to prevent fear, violence, genocide and terrorism through targeting the MDG goals" at the 58 th Annual Conference for Non-Governmental Organizations at the United Nations this past September.
     In her extensive international work, Dr. Judy is also a visiting professor at Peking University Health Sciences Center in Beijing China and the Department of Psychiatry at Hong Kong University. In China many times a year, she consults for the China Center for Reproductive Health Instruction in Shanghai, and trains doctors all over China, and appears often on China 's CCTV. She gives workshops on AIDS prevention for teens, couples counseling, and plenary addresses on peace and trauma recovery, around the world from India to Dubai and recently in Tehran, Iran, and at meetings on the State of the World Forum, and has been awarded the first "International Outreach award" from the American Women in Radio and TV. Trained in Buddhist shamanism, she has developed unique therapeutic interventions integrating eastern and western traditions. Author of innumerable articles in professional journals and over 10 books on dating and relationships translated in many languages, like the "Complete Idiots Guide to A Healthy Relationships, Dr. Judy has contributed psychological chapters to "Access: Emergency Survival Handbook," and is currently working on a book about Healing between Palestinians and Israelis from a psychosocial point of view, to be published by Praeger Press. 
     Also a journalist, and well-known as "Dr. Judy" to millions of fans from her nightly radio advice shows for over 22 years, she has also been a TV reporter on CBS-TV, hosted a show "Money and Emotions" on CNBC TV, and been a guest on innumerable news and talk shows from Oprah to Larry King, Court TV, and CNN. In print she has been a columnist for the Chicago Trubune Womens News, the Los Angeles Times syndicate, Advertising Age and Boardroom Reports, and currently writes advice columns for the New York Daily News, the Singapore Straits Times and China 's Trends Health Magazine. She has been featured in publications from People Magazine to Cosmopolitan and the New York Times.
Please see the note Judy presented at Round Table 2 of our workshop Psychosocial Aspects of the Israeli/Palestinian Conflict.

•  Camilla Hsiung, Department of Counseling Psychology, Masters Program, Columbia University Teachers College, NY, USA.

•  Tarek Maassarani, School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University, NY, USA.

•  Maggie O'Neill, Loughborough University, UK. Maggie O'Neill is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Maggie kindly wrote (May 26, 2005): I would love to come and take part and feel  the third round table is particularly important in relation to work I am doing in the UK. Is this the forum to explore the role of art as having transformative potential with regard to humiliation and violent conflict? Looking forward very much to meeting you.
Maggie is an Academic Advisor to our upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. See also Humiliation, Social Justice and Ethno-mimesis, note presented at the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, 6th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in New York, December 15-16, 2005.

•  Floyd Webster Rudmin, University of Tromsø, Norway. Floyd Rudmin is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and Global Core Team.
Floyd kindly wrote (May 30, 2005): It will be a pleasure for me to participate.
Floyd kindly works on three projects:
World Gender Relations for Equal Dignity
World Apology for Equal Dignity
and
Stop Hazing and Bullying.
06.11.2005, Floyd Webster Rudmin kindly explains the title of his contribution How would Humiliability be Programmed into a Robot?:
My thinking on this has nothing to do with robots. It has to do with humans. But if we try to imagine the programming components of a robot acting like a human, then we are forced to clearly think through what it is we humans are doing. I only bring in robots and programming as a creative devise to help thinking and analysis. Please see the abstract that Floyd presented at our workshop Six Research Designs on Humiliation.

•  Grace Feuerverger, University of Toronto, Canada. Grace Feuerverger is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board. Please see The "School For Peace": A Conflict Resolution Program in a Jewish-Palestinian Village, paper presented at the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.
Grace kindly wrote (July 15, 2005): I wanted you to know that it looks like I may very well be able to participate in the December conference in New York. Could you let me know when I should send in my paper abstract and any other info I should know about? Very warmly, Grace.

•  Sharon Burde, creating and implementing international projects in conflict resolution (in Israel, Neve Shalom/Wahat Al-Salam, Kosovo), teaching at several universities, New York.

•  Myra Mendible, PhD, American Studies
Myra kindly wrote (September 22): I am currently working on a book project that explores mediated representations of humiliation in contemporary news and television entertainment forms. I very much admire the work your center is contributing to this critical topic and would like to attend your upcoming workshops in New York. Would you kindly advise me of the steps I should take towards that end? Thank you.
Please see Mediated Humiliations: Spectacles of Power in Postmodern Cultur, abstract prepared by Myra for our 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict.

•  Patricia Rodriguez Mosquera, Ph.D., Researcher, Brunel University, UK. Patricia Rodriguez Mosquera is a Member of the HumanDHS Core Team and Research Team.
Patricia kindly wrote (September, 23, 2005): The December meeting at Columbia looks really great. If I could attend, would it be possible to give a presentation about a recent study on humiliation? In this study, I have looked at the role of anger and humiliation in three types of insult-related conflict: insults focused on self (e.g., lack of skills, competence); insults focused on rejection, not caring, ostracism (i.e., at the interpersonal level); and insults focused on a person's ethnic group membership (group-based insults). I believe this study would be interesting to the group since I have seen on the website that questions about the role of culture in humiliation, and the role of humiliation in affronts against one's person vs. affronts against one's groups are central to the meeting. My study directly speaks to these questions...
Hope all is well with you. With best wishes, Patricia.
Please see Humiliation and Honor, Patricia's note for our Round Table 1.

•  Annette A. Engler, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA. Annette Engler is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team and Education Team.
Annette kindly wrote (May 27, 2005): I have been anxiously awaiting this email :-) I will be delighted to be there and partake in any that I can. I especially liked the discussion of round table 2 "Is humiliation relevant in a destructive conflict" I wouldn't miss this event for anything and am honored and privileged to be a part of what you are doing. Please see the note she presented at our workshop: Displaced Identity and Humiliation in Children of Vietnam Veterans.
Please see also the Special Symposium Issue that Annette is preparing together with D. Raja Ganesan.

•  Neil Altman, New York University, NY, USA. Neil Altman is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team.
Please see his paper for our 2004 workshop Humiliation, Retaliation, and Violence, in Tikkun Magazine, January/February 2004. Neil can be with us only on Friday.

•  Miriam Marton, Lawyer, Detroit, USA. Miriam Marton is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team and the Research Team. She is part of the upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. The title of her project is The Dual Humiliation of Female Refugees by Sexually Violent, Gender-based Acts.
Miriam kindly wrote (September 21, 2005): I am trying to arrange everything so that I will be in New York!
02.11.2005, Miriam Marton kindly wrote:
Greetings, dear Evelin and Linda! [...] with respect to the topic of what is relevant in destructive conflict, I am not seeing any other participants covering the gender issue. [...] take care, Miriam H. Marton.

•  Virginia Swain, Center for Global Community and World Law, Worcester, MA, USA, and Director of The Institute for Global Leadership. Virginia Swain is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board. Pleaase see A Proposed Global Mediation and Reconciliation Service (2005), paper originally presented at the 1999 Hague Appeal for Peace on the Panel, Building an Effective World Security System to Enhance the Capacity of the United Nations to Prevent and Resolve Armed Conflict. The Panel was in the Transforming Violent Conflict Strand of the Netherlands conference 100 years after governments met for the same purpose. Please see Reconciliation as Policy: Moving Beyond the Victim-Perpetrator Lens in the United Nations Secretariat and Member States, draft co-authored with Sarah Sayeed for a chapter for Victoria Fontan's planned book on Humiliation, presented at Round Table 3 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.
Unfortunately, Virginia had to cancel in the last moment.

•  Sarah Sayeed, Ph.D., Women in Islam, Inc. and The Institute for Global Leadership (only Thursday).
Sarah Sayeed is a communication researcher, specializing in the design and evaluation of public education campaigns dealing with health and social issues, including on maternal and child health, domestic violence, adolescent sexuality and drug use, and HIV/AIDS. She has taught undergraduate and graduate level communication courses including topics such as communication in public and organizational settings and health and health care communication. Sarah is a board member of Women In Islam, Inc., a social justice and human rights education and advocacy organization, and of Muslim Consultative Network, a coalition of NY area Muslim organizations. She is also a member of the Advisory Board of the Auburn Seminary Multicultural Education Center , and the Auburn Multi-faith Women's Group.  Sarah is a student in the Institute for Global Leadership's Reconciliation Leadership Certificate Program. She holds an A.B. in Sociology and Near East Studies ( Princeton University ) and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Communication ( Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania ).

•  Laurence Berg, Director of the Conflict Resolution Program at American Friends Service Committee in NY, USA.
13.12.2005, Laurence Berg kindly wrote: My own interest in the topic is in connection with a training model I am developing that is designed to help people to make difficult conversations constructive.  It is growing out of the specific problem many people have in talking about the Israel/Palestine conflict.  What can you do when you cant even talk anymore because it is so fraught with emotion?  [...] I believe that issues such as humiliation are often at the core of peoples inability to engage in constructive conversation with people they disagree with.
Unfortunately, Laurence had to cancel in the last moment.

•  Anthony Abiodun Olowoyeye, London School of Management and Technology, Stratford, UK. Anthony Abiodun Olowoyeye is a Member of the HumanDHS Research Team. He is a researcher in our upcoming Terrorism and Humiliation Project. The title of his project is Africa, a Trigger in the Explosion of International Terrorism: A Critical Analysis of The "Apparatus" of Terrorism and its Causes.
Anthony kindly wrote (June 6, 2005): l would also like to ask if l could present a paper at the December Conference.
Unfortunately, Anthony could not come.

•  Jean Berchmans Ndayizigiye, Eastern Mennonite University, Harrisonburg, Virginia, USA. Jean Berchmans Ndayizigiye is a Member of the HumanDHS Research Team. He is a researcher in our upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. The title of his project is Refugees from the Great Lakes Region of Central Africa & Humiliation.
Jean B. Ndayizigiye kindly wrote (June, 8, 2005): I plan to attend the December workshop on Humiliation and violent conflict at Columbia University in New York. All the round tables seem very interesting, I will participate in the RT#2. Avec mon meilleur souvenir, enjoy your Summer. Thanks, Jean B. Ndayizigiye.
Please see his paper written for Round Table 1 of our workshop Humiliation and Violent Conflicts in Burundi.

•  Imelda Deinla, Attorney, Manila, Philippines, together with Jessica Los Baños and Jelen Paclarin. Imelda Deinla, Jessica Los Baños, and Jelen Paclarin, are Members of the HumanDHS Research Team. They are researchers in our upcoming Terrorism and Humiliation Project. The title of their project is The Effects of Humiliation on the Economic, Socio-cultural Rights and Access to Justice of Muslim Women in Mindanao.
Imelda kindly wrote (May 27, 2005): I am doing a review of incest cases in the Philippines (as decided by the Supreme Court) and can't help but think of the correlation or impact of humiliation to the victims in terms of their decision to come out and file a case and their coping mechanisms. Given the deep-seated respect and reverence of Filipinos to their elders and parents, this process is not always easy.
Imelda kindly wrote (June 29, 2005): I and Jessica would like to confirm our attendance during the Annual Meeting in New York on December 15-16, 2005. Jessica will already be there in New York by the time as she will be attending a training and I am probably coming from Sydney. We are looking forward to meeting you and the rest of the organization. Warm regards, Imelda.
Unfortunately, Imelda had to cancel in the last moment.

•  Ramona Eileen Cuevas, teacher in the south Bronx, NY, USA.

•  Robert Kolodny, independent organization development consultant based in NYC. On 10.11.2005, Robert Kolodny kindly wrote:
I am a friend and colleague of Don Klein, who alerted me to the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies group and the December workshop. In addition to my consulting practice, I also teach in a number of professional institutes in the US and abroad and have been on the faculty at Columbia and the New School. My interest in the conference follows from work I have been doing over the past several years on the impact of shame in organizational life. There has been a rediscovery of shame as a primary regulator of the social field among psychotherapists and theorists on human behavior at the individual and family levels. However, there is precious little theory or even awareness of its potent role in groups and organizations. Indeed, the absence itself, I think, tells us something about the invisibility and "shamefulness" of shame in most of Western culture. I am doing this work with a colleague, Cathe Carlson. In June of this year we co-chaired a conference on "Shame and Power in Organizational Life" at the Gestalt International Study Center on Cape Cod. We are preparing an article for publication in 2006.

•  Philip Brown, Director of the New JerseyCenter for Character Education in
Piscataway, NJ, USA. Please see his paper for our 2004 workshop Humiliation, Bullying and Caring in School Communities.
Philip kindly wrote (August 24, 2005): Hi Evelin -- Thank you for thinking of me. Yes, I would love to join you again for the New York meeting and very much appreciate your invitation. I think the area that I could contribute most meaningfully would be in the session on how humiliation can be useful in public policy. Assuming the format will be the same as last year, I could prepare a short paper and do a 5 minutes + talk on the relationship between "bad deeds in the public and private sectors" engendering an educational response that has generated $28 million in state public funding support in New Jersey and $60-80 million nationally.
Please see here his paper for our workshop, Reflections on Policy and Humiliation: Addressing the Needs of Poor Minority Children in New Jersey’s Public Schools.

•  Linda Guinee, Senior Associate of the Interaction Institute for Social Change, USA. Unfortunately, Linda had to cancel in the last moment.

•  Ana Ljubinkovic, University of Essex, UK. Ana Ljubinkovic is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Board, and Research Team. Please see also From Violent to Subtle Humiliation: Case of Somali Victims of UNOSOM Living in the Refugee Camps in Kenya, note presented at Round Table 1 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005. See furthermore Is Hope the Last to Die? Research Study On The Situational Analysis In The Dadaab Refugee Camps, 2005, and Report on Field Research Conducted in Dadaab Refugee Camps (16.05.05 - 01.06.05), 2005.

•  Jill Strauss, Program Director of The Temple of Understanding.

•  Sophie Schaarschmidt, M.A. Psychology of Culture and Religion, Department of Life-Span Psychology, University of Hagen, Germany. Please see Cognitive and Emotional Ingroup-identification of Youth in Israel and Palestine, note presented at our workshop.

•  Munir Zaki Nuseibah, "Peace Fellow" at Public International Law and Policy Group, American University, Washington DC, USA.

•  Tonya Hammer, Doctoral Student in Counseling at St. Mary's University in Texas, US.

•  Judith Thompson, Frontiers of Social Healing Dialogue, USA
Judith Thompson kindly wrote (13th June, 2005): Dear Evelin: Don Klein suggested that I contact you about the conference in Berlin in September. I have recently completed my doctoral dissertation on on the question of how compassion arises in the process of social healing. Don was my reader. I was very pleased that he thought the dissertation was "exemplary" (to use his words) and that it he thought I could both gain from and contribute to the conference.
In my work I had a section on humiliation, noting that the recent interest in understanding humiliation (begun by Don and carried on so brilliantly by you!) is one of the moves toward the relational roots of conflict which constitute what I call the social healing paradigm (which stresses the holistic and systems aspects of peacebuilding work). My interest in compassion been the product of my decades of work in the field ­ mostly in peace education, cultural/community organizing, and international dialogue, and running an international non-profit for over a decade. The themes of enlarging one’s self concept and self-experience through the connection to other’s suffering has been central to that work (as well as personally enlightening and enriching). I will be sharing some of my research at a conference in Sarajevo this summer on Global Human Rights, together with Ken Suslak, who I believe has also been in contact with you. I would love to both share my own work and learn from others in Berlin, and hope to hear more from you about how that might occur. A little bit of information on what I’ve been doing can be found here: http://69.36.178.127/resources/thompson/thompson.html and
http://69.36.178.127/resources/restore_justice/carsarjianthompson.html
I look forward to hearing from you. And, thank you for the wonderful work you have been doing! Judith Thompson
On June 28, 2005, Judith kindly wrote: Thanks Evelin!  There is also a meeting in NYC coming up, yes? Will that be similar? I dont think there would be any problem of coming to that one!

•  Jessica Benjamin, psychoanalyst, peace practitioner and longtime activist, NY, USA.

•  Noel Mordana, New York USA. Noel participated in ORLJ 4859, Conflict Resolution & the Psychology of Humiliation Fall 2004, Nov 12-14, with Evelin Lindner.

•  Thushari Samarawickrama, a Fulbright scholar from Sri Lanka presently enrolled in the MA in Conflict Transformation at the Eastern Mennonite University.
On 28.11.2005, she kindly wrote:
I would like to participate at the forthcoming workshop on Humiliation and Violent conflict....
The concept of Humiliation and Violent conflict had been an important topic in my career and academic work. In my current studies at the EMU I have undertaken a research project on dealing with emotions during negotiation processes (based on Beyond Reason by Roger Fisher). Before arriving at the USA as a Fulbright scholar (in September 2005), I have gained 7-10 years of work experience in many fields of activites in countries such as Tajikistan, South Africa, Sweden, India, Sri Lanka etc. I have worked during complex humanitarian emergency situations, early warning systems & disaster preparedness, program management & development, transitional justice, conflict transformation and journalism. My work responsibilities ranged from being an activist to a Program Manager in the organizations that I have served; such as Caritas Internationalis (Caritas Belgium and Austria in Sri Lanka) Red Cross (in Sri Lanka and India), the International Centre for Transitional Justice (in South Africa), the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (Sweden) and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (in Sri Lanka) and my most recent work experience was in Tajikistan (Central Asia) as a Project Advisor/Consultant in a Disaster Preparedness project with the Care International. Also I hold a Master of Arts in Peace and Conflict Studies from the European Peace University in Austria. Given my exposure and interst in Humiliation and Violent conflict, I would really appreciate an opportunity to participate at it.

•  Leonard Ira Morgenbesser, Adjunct Faculty Member, Part Time/Distance Learning Programmes, M.A. Degree Social Policy Studies/Graduate Studies, B.A. Degree Criminology/Criminal Justice Studies, Empire State College, State University of New York. (hopefully)
Unfortunately, Leonard Morgenbesser could not come.

•  Ariel Lublin, Mediation Coordinator for the Center for Court Innovation's Midtown Community Court in Manhattan, NY, USA.
Ariel Lublin has been the Mediation Coordinator for the Midtown Community Court (a restorative justice project of the Center for Court Innovation), where she directed a mediation program, led trainings in communication and conflict resolution for attorneys, school counselors, and others, and convened and facilitated dialogues for groups in conflict. These group discussions often included criminal defendants, homeless individuals, advocacy groups, nightclub and hotel owners and managers, police officers, public officials, non-profit service agencies, and neighborhood resident associations seeking shared solutions to common concerns.
As an assistant teacher at Harvard’s Center for Public Leadership, Ariel worked with students from over 30 countries, many involved directly in violent conflicts in their own countries. She advised and taught students in two classes - Exercising Leadership: Mobilizing Group Resources, and Managing Intractable Conflict: Leadership and Multiparty Dispute Resolution. She was also involved in the first two Women Waging Peace Conferences with the Women and Public Policy Program, assisting with a manual on best practices and presenting on Sudanese Women Peace Activists. And she authored an article on ethnic conflict in Kosovo.
A counselor for many years, she previously directed a psychiatric crisis intervention team for the state of Massachusetts.
Personally, Ariel, like many people, has also learned from experiences of conflict in her own life. By heritage half German gentile and half Russian Jew, as well as a child of divorced parents, she grew up appreciating how cultural and personal habits can be interpreted as "good" or "bad" depending which home or group you are with. In addition, she has experienced being physically assaulted by a partner, and has presented on alternative personal, social, and legal responses to violence.
In addition to conflict resolution work, Ariel also supports people in designing life-affirming ceremonies, including weddings and other celebrations.
Please see the note Ariel has presented at Round Table 3 of our workshop,
Addressing Humiliation through Listening with Respect: A Restorative Justice Model for Victims, Offenders, and Law Enforcement.

•  Melissa Sweeney, International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (ICCCR), Teachers College, Columbia University, USA.

•  Kathryn Crawford, International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (ICCCR), Teachers College, Columbia University, USA.

•  Naira Musallam, International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (ICCCR), Teachers College, Columbia University, USA.

•  Merle Lefkoff, President, Ars Publica, Santa Fe, NM, USA
Merle kindly wrote (June 22, 2005): Thank you so much for the invitation to attend the meeting in December! Please see the note that Merle presented at our workshop When the Butterfly Flaps Her Wings in Gaza.

•  Anie Kalayjian, American Board Certified Expert in Traumatic Stress, logotherapeutic psychotherapist, researcher, and consultant, USA. Please meet Anie at http://www.meaningfulworld.com/bio.html.
Anie kindly wrote (July 13, 2005): Dear Evelin: This is a wonderful conference, and I am looking forward to do a forgiveness workshop or a panel. Kindly let me know what you need from us. I am attaching a one page short resume for your information. Much gratitude, Anie. Her topic for our workshop is Turkish Denial of the Genocide of Armenians, Greeks, Assyrians: Transforming Humiliation into Understanding and Forgiveness.

•  Judit Révész, Lawyer, Researcher, NY Director of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team, and Global HumanDHS Staff. Since 2001, Judit supports our work untiringly, every day, actively.

•  Stephanie Heuer, Randol Elementary School, CA, USA (hopefully). Stephanie Heuer is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team and Education Team.
Please see the educational book that Safa created, inspired by our 2004 Paris meeting and Robert Fuller's work on Rankism. She is publishing this book by herself, so please write to her for a copy, safa40 at hotmail.com: I Feel Like Nobody When … I Feel Like Somebody When …
Our vision of our work is that people use it as a platform for their own creativity and initiative. Stephanie is the impressive example of somebody who takes ideas, imbues them with wonderful creativity and then has the personal independence, strength and dedication to come up, single-handedly, as a strong actor, with a product that reaches beyond the original idea in specific ways.
On 20th May 2005, Stephanie wrote saying that she might not be able to come to Berlin, but that she would like to present her book at our NY meeting in December, and explain the process she went through from our group's last meeting in Paris until now. The theme would be: Children and Dignity, A template for Change. Safa wrote:
The reason I say template for change is this: I think we all recognize that there are humiliating acts going on all the time, at many different levels, as well as, violations of our dignity. What I feel I needed is a course for change, a way to feel and act differently. Bob's book inspired me to change the way I processed emotions. I came back and resigned from my job (which was not accepted), based on Rankism. Things changed. After I did my research in the area of my students answering the two questions, their responses floored me. Their responses CHANGED the way I looked at them, and the way I taught as an educator. I listen closer, I don't embarrass students, I process thought differently.
We NEED templates for change. It is great to recognize problems, now we need to come up with simple and direct ways to change the way people treat and perceive the people around them.

•  Tzvetelina Tzoneva (Lina), and Mercedes St. Elin, University of Geneva, Switzerland (hopefully). Tzvetelina Tzoneva and Mercedes Jauregui are Members of the HumanDHS Research Team. They are a researcher in our upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. The title of their project is Dignity-Humiliation in the Case of Internally Displaced Persons in Latin America: The Examples of Colombia, Guatemala, Peru and Mexico.

•  Zahid Shahab Ahmed, Sahil, Pakistan (hopefully). Zahid Shahab Ahmed is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team and Research Team. He is a researcher in our upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. The title of his project is Refugees in South Asia and Humiliation.

•  Neil Ryan Walsh, M.A. Candidate, Psychology, The New School for Social Research, M.A. Candidate, Psychology, New York, USA.

•  Alyi Patrick Lalur, United Nations University for Peace, Uganda/UK. Patrick Lalur is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team and Research Team. He is also a Director of our Child Soldiers Project together with Mette Newth. Alyi Patrick Lalur is furthermore a researcher in our upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. The title of his project is Resilience, Humiliation and Adulthood Sexual Abuse: Understanding the Psychology of Violence Among Sudanese Refugees living in Uganda.
Patrick kindly write (May 27, 2005): Good greetings. I would very much like to attend the 2005 meeting. Although I was not present in the 2004 Round table meetings, I think that there is a great need to continue with the themes. The participants could as well put more emphasis on issues of public policy.
At the moment I am researching on the protection of returned ex-child soldiers in Northern Uganda. Part of the report is to include a new paradigm for policy change in Uganda. I am thinking of publishing the complete finding and feel the 2005 meeting will give me the opportunities to receive feedback from participants. When am done I will give you a more complete title and other important information, however, since receiving your mail I have been thinking an appropriate title would be Humiliation and Fears among Ex-child Soldiers: A new Paradigm for Public Policy Change in Uganda.
Patrick kindly wrote again (June 8, 2005): Dear Evelin. Good greetings. I hope your are fine and happy there. I can see that the list of those preparing for the workshop has become longer. Thank you for your hard work. When I read Mette Newth's reflections on child soldiers, I feel she shares a lot of concerns about the phenomena as I do. Could you please link me with her so that we can work together on the issues? She has amazing talents in documentation that I will be starting in September 2005. If it is fine with you and her we could start exchanging documentary, pictures and children's writing which can be edited and included into the confrence book. Think about this suggestion and let me know how both of you feel about the idea. It is easy for me to send the documentary on DVD tapes and she does the selections and the editing. I will be writing to you later. Warm greetings and blessings to you. Patrick.
Unfortunately, Patrick could not come, due to lack of funding.

•  Howard Adelman, York University in Toronto, Canada. Howard Adelman is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Howard Adelman kindly contributes with the following paper:
Theories of Genocide: The Case of Rwanda
Forthcoming in a proposed volume for the McGill-Queen's University Press series, Studies in Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict, 2005.

•  Francisco Gomes de Matos, Federal University of Pernambuco (UFPE) in Recife, Brasil (hopefully). Francisco Gomes de Matos is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board. He is also the Director of our World Language for Equal Dignity Project, our Creativity Through Equal Dignity Project, and our Cross-Cultural Linguistics for Equal Dignity Project (together with Thomas Daffern).
Francisco kindly wrote (May 24, 2005): The design of the Round Tables sound fine to me. I'd suggest the addition of another query to number 3 (obviously my bias, Evelin...): Educating human beings in coping with humiliation: communicative dimensions. You see, I feel that such aspect of the Humiliation Continuum needs
specific, concentrated attention,too. After all, humiliation tends to be mostly dehumanizing,destructive acts/actions mediated via language. Please see here also Francisco's poem on Peace Patriotism.
Francisco Gomes de Matos has developed a sociolinguistic checklist with the aim to identify how humiliation is communicated in daily life, so as to create a database that can be used by policy planners who attempt to diminish and end humiliating practices. Please see Communicative Humiliation: A Sociolinguistic Checklist (2005).
Unfortunately, Francisco could not come, due to lack of funding.

•  Arie Nadler, Professor of Social Psychology, Dean, Tel Aviv University, Israel. Arie Nadler is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and Research Team. He is an Academic Advisor for our Terrorism and Humiliation Project.
see his paper from our 2004 NY meeting: How Dynamics of Humiliation Can Be Overcome by Apology.
Unfortunately, Arie could not come.


 

Details of the Convening Organizations

The Center for International Conflict Resolution (CICR) is part of the Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN), as is the International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (ICCCR), and Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) that aims at contributing to the resolution of international deadly conflict through research, teaching and fieldwork.

CICR's location within the Institute of War and Peace Studies at Columbia University 's School of Public and International Affairs allows for research collaborations inside and outside of the university with academics and practitioners from governmental, non-governmental and international organizations. The CICR faculty advisory includes Professors Richard Betts, Page Fortna, Robert Jervis and Jack Snyder. Former U.S. Senator George Mitchell joined the Center as a Senior Fellow in July 2002.

The Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN) was founded in 1997 by a voluntary group of faculty members from throughout the University interested in conflict resolution. The result of their efforts was a broad-based multidisciplinary conflict resolution resource for the entire Columbia community to use to strengthen the research, teaching and training initiatives of its independent schools and departments.

The International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (ICCCR) was founded in 1986 by Morton Deutsch. It is at present headed by Peter Coleman, with Beth Fisher-Yoshida as Associate Director. ICCCR is an innovative Center dedicated to advancing the study and practice of conflict resolution. ICCCR's mission is an educational one: to help individuals, schools, communities, businesses and governments better understand the nature of conflict and develop the skills and settings that enable them to resolve conflict constructively.

Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) was founded by Evelin Lindner in 2002 as a partner institute of the Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network. HumanDHS's mission is to contribute to reducing - and ultimately eliminating - destructive disrespect and humiliation around the world. HumanDHS's efforts focus on generating research, disseminating information, applying creative educational methods, as well as devising pilot projects and policy strategies.


 

Papers

All participants are warmly invited to send in their papers as soon as they can. Victoria C. Fontan has kindly taken upon her the task to develop edited books (with the help of Christopher Santee, Linda Hartling, Arie Nadler, and Evelin Lindner) starting with the contributions of the participants of our Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict in 2004. Please see Violent Conflict and Humiliation.

Victoria C. Fontan has furthermore kindly taken upon herself the responsibility of being the editor of our journal. Please notify us, if you wish to submit any of your papers either as a book chapter or as a journal article. (Please see the papers and notes that were submitted for earlier workshops and meetings)

Please see earlier submitted papers here:
• List of All Publications
• Papers and Notes for the 2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict

Please ask the authors for their authorization if you wish to quote them!

 

Abstracts/Notes/Papers of 2005

Please see further down the papers/notes that participants send in prior to the workshop so that everybody can get acquainted with all others beforehand. (Please see here last year's papers and notes)

See here the work by:
Andrea Bartoli
Linda Hartling
Donald Klein

Victoria Firmo-Fontan

Philip Brown (2005)
Reflections on Policy and Humiliation: Addressing the Needs of Poor Minority Children in New Jersey’s Public Schools

Draft paper presented at Round Table 3 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Gay Rosenblum-Kumar (2005)
Horizontal Inequality and Humiliation: Public policy for disaffection or cohesion?

Note presented at Round Table 3 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Francisco Gomes de Matos (2005)
Communicative Humiliation: A Sociolinguistic Checklist
A sociolinguistic checklist identifying how humiliation is communicated in daily life, so as to create a database that can be used by policy planners who attempt to diminish and end humiliating practices.

Virginia Swain and Sarah Sayeed (2005)
Reconciliation as Policy: Moving Beyond the Victim-Perpetrator Lens in the United Nations Secretariat and Member States
Draft for a chapter for Victoria Fontan's planned book on Humiliation, presented at Round Table 3 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Judy Kuriansky (2005)
Psychosocial Aspects of the Israeli/Palestinian Conflict
Note presented at Round Table 2 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Merle S. Lefkoff (2005)
When the Butterfly Flaps Her Wings in Gaza
Note presented at Round Table 3 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Floyd W. Rudmin (2005)
Six Research Designs on Humiliation
Abstract presented at Round Table 2 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Ariel Lublin (2005)
Addressing Humiliation through Listening with Respect: A Restorative Justice Model for Victims, Offenders, and Law Enforcement
Note presented at Round Table 3 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Jean Berchmans Ndayizigiye (2005)
Humiliation and Violent Conflicts in Burundi
Paper presented at Round Table 1 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Anne Wyatt-Brown (2005)
A Woman in Berlin: The Complexity of Humiliation at the End of World War II
Abstract of a paper presented at Round Table 2 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Linda Hartling (2005)
Humiliation: Real Pain, A Pathway to Violence
Preliminary draft of a paper presented at Round Table 2 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Donald C. Klein (2005)
The Humiliation Dynamic: Looking to the Past and Future
Paper presented at the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.
Please see also Looking to the Past, Looking to the Future, New Years Greetings: 2006!

Rina Kashyap (2005)
The Subversion of the Colonial System of Humiliation: A case study of the Gandhian Strategy
Paper presented at Round Table 3 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Marcela Valdata (2005)
Humiliation Policies Applied to Individuals, Detainees and Refugees During the Period 1975/1983 in Rosario, Argentina: Brief Historical and Political Development of the 20th Century
Paper presented at the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Patricia Rodriguez Mosquera (2005)
Humiliation and Honor
Note presented at Round Table 1 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Sophie Schaarschmidt (2005)
Cognitive and Emotional Ingroup-identification of Youth in Israel and Palestine
Note presented at Round Table 1 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Ana Ljubinkovic (2005)
From Violent to Subtle Humiliation: Case of Somali Victims of UNOSOM Living in the Refugee Camps in Kenya
Note presented at Round Table 1 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Ana Ljubinkovic (2005)
Is Hope the Last to Die? Research Study On The Situational Analysis In The Dadaab Refugee Camps.

Ana Ljubinkovic (2005)
Report on Field Research Conducted in Dadaab Refugee Camps (16.05.05 - 01.06.05)

Howard Zehr (2005)
Humiliation, Crime and Justice
Note presented at Round Table 3 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Maggie O'Neill (2005)
Humiliation, Social Justice and Ethno-mimesis
Note presented at the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, 6th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Thomas J. Scheff (2005)
Roots of War and Peace: Emotions and Bonds in Moral Shock
Paper presented at the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005. Tom wrote: "I would appreciate any comment you or your colleagues would care to make."

Sara Cobb (2004)
"Humiliation" as Positions in Narratives: Implications for Policy Development
Paper presented at the Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, November 18-19, 2004.

Myra Mendible (2005)
Mediated Humiliations: Spectacles of Power in Postmodern Culture
Abstract presented at the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Annette Anderson-Engler (2005)
Displaced Identity and Humiliation in Children of Vietnam Veterans
Note presented at the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Alyi Patrick Lalur (2005)
Child Soldiers Worldwide: Uncharted Cycles of Slavery Beneath the Surface of International Shame
Paper presented at the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Kjell Skyllstad (2005)
From Humiliation to Empowerment: Creative Conflict Management in the Multi-ethnic School
Paper presented at Round Table 1 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Kjell Skyllstad (2005)
From Humiliation to Empowerment: The Arts in Retributive and Restorative Justice
Paper presented at Round Table 3 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Grace Feuerverger (2005)
The "School For Peace": A Conflict Resolution Program in a Jewish-Palestinian Village
Paper presented at the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.


 

Final Papers of 2005

(Please see here last year's papers)

Maria Volpe (2005)
Conflict and Humiliation: The Simplicities of Reversing Destructive Conflict
Presentation given at the Public Event of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Milbank Chapel, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.
The Association for Conflict Resolution Crisis Intervention online newsletter featured this presentation in its 2006 February issue.

Jennifer S. Goldman, Peter T. Coleman (2005)
A Theoretical Understanding of How Emotions Fuel Intractable Conflict: The Case of Humiliation
Paper presented at Round Table 2 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Linda Hartling (2005)
Humiliation and Assistance: Telling the Truth About Power, Telling a New Story
Paper presented at "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.

Neil Altman (2004)
Humiliation, Retaliation, and Violence, in Tikkun Magazine, January/February 2004

Howard Adelman (2005)
Theories of Genocide: The Case of Rwanda
Forthcoming in a proposed volume for the McGill-Queen's University Press series, Studies in Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict, 2005.

Telhami, Shibley (2003)
History and Humiliation
The Washington Post, Friday, Friday, March 28, 2003.

Morton Deutsch (2004)
Oppression and Conflict
Paper presented at the Interrupting Oppression and Sustaining Justice Working Conference at ICCCR, NY, February 27-29, 2004.

Jennifer S. Goldman, Peter T. Coleman (2005)
How Humiliation Fuels Intractable Conflict: The Effects of Emotional Roles on Recall and Reactions to Conflictual Encounters
Work in progress, Teachers College, Columbia University, 2005.

Thomas J. Scheff (2004)
Thoughts in Response to Blind Trust (2004) by V. Volkan, a Theory of Collective Violence (2004)

Evelin Lindner (2004)
Humiliation in a Globalizing World: Does Humiliation Become the Most Disruptive Force? (2004)
See the same text here, as short summary, and longer paper (not to be cited without author's authorization).