2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict
representing the
8th Annual HumanDHS Conference

December 14-15, 2006
New York City, Columbia University, Teachers College, 525 West 120th Street
(subway 1, exit 116th Street)

Morton Deutsch, Honorary Convenor

morton

Two-day Workshop:
•  Thursday, December 14, 2006, 10.00 am - 5.00 pm, Milbank Chapel
•  Friday, December 15, 2006, 10.00 am - 5.30 pm, room 285 Grace Dodge
•  Public Event on Thursday evening, , December 14, 2006, 5.00 pm – 8.00 pm, Milbank Chapel


Please see:
•  This workshop is the third one in a series that began in 2003:
see the 2004 and 2005 Workshops and a compilation of all NY workshops
•  Newsletter Nr. 8, compiled subsequent to this workshop

•  Workshop Notes (thanks to Jessica et al.!):
•  Round Table 1 - 12.14.06
•  Round Table 2 - 12.15.06
•  Round Table 3 - 12.15.06
•  Public Event - 12.14.06
•  What Now - 12.14.06
•  What Now - 12.15.06
)

• Our Workshops on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict are convened by ICCCR - International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution, with Morton Deutsch, its Director Emeritus, as our Honorary Convener,
on behalf of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) as part of the
Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN). We are very grateful to our hosts!
• We thank Kathryn Crawford for so kindly arranging Milbank Chapel and room 285 Grace Dodge for our workshop!
• To request disability-related accommodations and equipment, please contact OASID at oasid@tc.edu, (212) 678-3689, (212) 678-3853 TTY, (212) 678-3854 video phone
• This Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict has been made possible by a generous contribution from the Slifka Foundation (please see the HumanDHS' Work: Objectives and Evidence of Success, developed in cooperation between HumanDHS and ABSF in 2006)

8th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in NY in 2006, December 14-15, 2006

These pictures were taken by Brian Lynch. Please see him in the middle in the photo further down! Please see all his pictures also on http://share.shutterfly.com/, and download your preferred pictures from there. Thanks a million for all your great work, dear Brian!
(Important note to our conference particants: During our conference, we asked for your permission to be posted here, however, if you have changed your mind since, either in total or for specific pictures, please let us know! Thank you! Since we wish to walk the talk of dignity, it is very important for us to do our utmost in respecting everybody's privacy. We refrain from gathering written permissions from you during our conferences, since we value the building of mutual trust in relationships, and we also would like to refrain from contributing to an ever more bureaucratic and legalistic society.)



Please click in the middle of the pictures to see more photos. From the left top corner:
1. Please click on the main entrance of Teachers College to see the venue of our workshop, Columbia University, Teachers College, and Milbank Chapel.
2. We greet each other and present ourselves.
3. Evelin's talk.
4. Lunch on Day One.
5. Round Table 1.
6. Group pictures.
7. Cybele sings and plays for us.
8. Our Public Event on the afternoon of Day One.
9. Round Table 2 on Day Two.
10. Round Table 3 on Day Two.
11. Get-together after our workshop.

Please click here or in the middle of the picture to see all the pictures from Evelin's camera.

 

Our Workshop Had Two Parts:

•  Public Event - Everybody Was Warmly Invited to Come!
Thursday, December 14, 2006, 5.00 pm – 8.00 pm
Columbia University, Teachers College, Milbank Chapel
Refreshments, a chance to mingle and meet

•  Workshop
Thursday and Friday, December 14-15, 2006, 10.00 am - 5.00 pm
Columbia University, Teachers College, 525 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027.
This part of our workshop was not public. You were warmly invited to get in touch with us, if you wished to participate.

•  Where to stay!
• Everybody was kindly asked to please arrange for your housing here (we thank Tony Jenkins for allowing us to use this link!)
• Please see also US SERVAS, hosting people generally for one to two nights. Any extension beyond that is up to the host to extend, and traveler to accept. Most NYC hosts do not host more than a week, if the visitor is someone they really feel comfortable with and grow to like. Again, that is up to the individual.
• Please see furthermore Sara's New York Homestay, through which international students, visitors, interns or executives who come to New York, Los Angeles, Paris or London for a short period of time (1 to 12 months) can find a place to stay.
• Please see also Couchsurfing.com.

•  Please kindly note that...
• There is no registration fee for our conferences. To cover our expenses, we always summarize the costs during the conference and invite participants to contribute according to their ability. This collaborative approach to financing allows us to keep the conference affordable for all.
• We like to get to know participants prior to our conferences and workshops, and prior to issuing an invitation.
• All our gatherings are by invitation only, please approach us so that we can include you and register you. Only our Public Events are open to everybody without registration.
• The Non-Public Parts of our gatherings have limited enrollment.
• Participants are encouraged to find their own sources of funding or economic support to participate in our conferences. We offer our nurturing work as our gift of love and care to you, ad we
would like to lovingly invite everybody to contribute to this gift economy. If you need funding for your travels and housing, please inquire in your country and your university about possibilities. See, among others, for the US, www.supportcenter.org and www.foundationscenter.org. The Weinstein International Fellowship program, inaugurated in 2008, provides opportunities for individuals from outside the United States to visit the U.S. to learn more about dispute resolution processes and practices and to pursue a project of their own design that serves to advance the resolution of disputes in their home countries.
• Participants are kindly asked to handle all of their travel arrangements and required documentation, including requests for visas, on their side. HumanDHS is a volunteer initiative and does not have staff or resources to assist with visa requests.

•  Permissions
During our conferences, we always ask all participants for their permission to have their pictures or videos posted on our website, however, if you change your mind later, either in total or for specific pictures/videos, please let us know! Thank you! Since we wish to walk the talk of dignity, it is very important for us to do our utmost in respecting everybody's privacy. We refrain from gathering written permissions from you during our conferences, since we value the building of mutual trust in relationships, and we also would like to refrain from contributing to an ever more bureaucratic and legalistic society.

•  What happened in our previous meetings?
Please have a look at our previous meetings and at the newsletters written after these meetings! See our newsletter Nr. 8, compiled subsequent to this meeting.

 


 

 

Overview

Frame
•  Rationale
•  How We Go About
•  Frame
•  List of Conveners

Program
•  Public Event: Everybody was warmly invited!
•  Program
(Day One & Day Two)
•  Round Table 1: How is humiliation relevant to destructive conflict? (Day One)
•  Round Table 2: How can the notion of humiliation be useful for public policy planning and for cultivating positive social change? (Day Two)
•  Round Table 3: What works? What types of social change efforts show promise in reducing violent conflict and humiliation while upholding the dignity of all people? (Day Two)

Participants and Convening Organizations
•  Participants (in all NY workshops so far, with their personal messages to the other participants)
•  Details of the Convening Organizations

Papers
•  Papers

Pictures
•  Pictures of our 2004 NY workshop
•  Pictures 2004 with Morton Deutsch
•  Pictures of our 2005 NY workshop (from Evelin's camera)
•  Pictures of our 2006 NY workshop (from Evelin's camera)
•  Pictures of our 2006 NY workshop, taken by Brian Lynch, venue of our workshop, Columbia University, Teachers College, and Milbank Chapel
•  Pictures of our 2006 NY workshop, taken by Brian Lynch, we greet each other and present ourselves
•  Pictures of our 2006 NY workshop, taken by Brian Lynch, Evelin's talk
•  Pictures of our 2006 NY workshop, taken by Brian Lynch, lunch on Day One
•  Pictures of our 2006 NY workshop, taken by Brian Lynch, Round Table 1
•  Pictures of our 2006 NY workshop, taken by Brian Lynch, group pictures
•  Pictures of our 2006 NY workshop, taken by Brian Lynch, Cybele sings and plays for us
•  Pictures of our 2006 NY workshop, taken by Brian Lynch, our Public Event on the afternoon of Day One
•  Pictures of our 2006 NY workshop, taken by Brian Lynch, Round Table 2 on Day Two
•  Pictures of our 2006 NY workshop, taken by Brian Lynch, Round Table 3 on Day Two
•  Pictures of our 2006 NY workshop, taken by Brian Lynch, get-together after our workshop

Newsletters
•  Newsletter 3, written as report subsequent to our 2004 NY workshop
•  Newsletter 4, written in summer 2005
•  Newsletter 5, written as report subsequent to our 2005 Berlin meeting
•  Newsletter 6, written as report subsequent to our 2005 NY workshop
•  Newsletter 7, written as report subsequent to our 2006 Costa Rica meeting
•  Newsletter 8, written as report subsequent to our 2006 NY workshop

• Compilation of all NY workshops
Please see the 2005 workshop notes:
•  the Conference Notes of Day One (thanks to Tonya et al.!)
•  the Conference Notes of Day Two (thanks to Tonya et al.!)
Please see the 2006 workshop notes (thanks to Jessica et al.!):
•  Round Table 1 - 12.14.06
•  Round Table 2 - 12.15.06
•  Round Table 3 - 12.15.06
•  Public Event - 12.14.06
•  What Now - 12.14.06
•  What Now - 12.15.06

 


 

Rationale, Methodology, and Frame

 

Rationale

Given the current context of the field of international conflict, the impact of emotions on conflict has become one of the most important questions worldwide. However, there are only scattered publications in the research and applied literature that would address issues on conflict and emotion directly, as well as their relations and their impact on public policy.

The first two-day workshop was held at Teachers College, Columbia University, in 2004, hosted by the Columbia University's Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN), with special help from SIPA – Center for International Conflict Resolution (CICR) and the International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (ICCCR).

Since 2004, CICR on behalf of CU-CRN and HumanDHS invites selected groups of scholars, counselors, conflict resolution practitioners, mediators, and teachers among other professions for a two-day workshop every year to explore issues of conflict and emotions and its application to actual negotiations and diplomacy. The aim is to particularly probe the role of the notion of humiliation from the two different angles of conflict and emotion.

The workshops are envisaged as a learning community gathering, interactive and highly participatory. The purpose is to create an open space to identify and sharpen our understanding of the discourse and debate on emotion and conflict and the role that might, or might not be played by humiliation within this field. We hope to be able to continue this effort in follow-up workshops in the future.

We see humiliation as entry point into broader analysis and not as "single interest scholarship." We are aware that most participants focus on other aspects than humiliation in their work and have not thought about humiliation much, or even at all. We do not expect anybody to do so beforehand. We encourage that everybody comes with his/her background, his/her theoretical concepts and tools, and that we, during the conference, reflect together. We invite everybody to use their focus and give a thought to whether the notion of humiliation could be enriching, or not, and if yes, in what way. We warmly invite diverging and dissenting views.

How We Go About

In our meetings, we choose a dialogical methodology that stresses interaction and participation, because we wish to create an atmosphere of openness and respectful inquiry through Round Tables and, when appropirate, the use of Open Space Technology. We believe that notions such as dignity and respect for equal dignity are important not only for conflict resolution, but also for meetings such as our workshops. The name Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies attempts to express this. We wish to strive for consistency between what we think are important values for conflict resolution, and the way we conduct our work and our meetings.

We believe in "waging good conflict" (Jean Baker Miller). We believe that diverging opinions and perspectives need to be expressed and not avoided, because diversity enriches. However, diversity only enriches if embedded into mutual connection and appreciation. If not harnessed lovingly and caringly, diversity has the potential to divide, create hostility, and foster hatred and even violence. In the spirit of our vision, we, the HumanDHS network, wish therefore to avoid the latter and foster an atmosphere of common ground and mutual caring connection as a space for the safe expression of even the deepest differences and disagreements, and the toughest questions of humiliation, trauma, and injustice.

Every Round Table is being opened by brief remarks by each participant to present their entry points into the inquiry. In order to facilitate feedback, we are asking that papers/notes are sent in to us in advance. We wish to make available your brief synopsis of 1 to 4 pages, with references, prior to the workshop through this site so that all participants can meet virtually before meeting in person. Longer papers are welcome as well both prior and subsequent to our workshops, not least for the envisaged publications of the results of our meetings. Please notify us, if you wish to submit any of your papers also as a book chapter or as a journal article in our Journal of HumanDignity and Humiliation Studies.

All participants are warmly invited to send in their papers as soon as they can.

Frame

by Linda Hartling, Ph.D., Associate Director, Jean Baker Miller Training Institute, Wellesley College, Boston, USA

In our meetings we aim at creating a humiliation-free, collaborative learning environment characterized by mutual respect, mutual empathy, and openness to difference. The perspective of "appreciative enquiry" is a useful frame of our work. Our HumanDHS efforts are not just about the work we do together, but also about HOW WE WORK TOGETHER. At appropriate points during our meetings, for example at the end of each day, we take a moment to reflect on the practices observed that contributed to an appreciative/humiliation-free learning experience.

It is important to emphasize that an appreciative approach is not about expecting people to agree. In fact, differences of opinion enrich the conversation and deepen people's understanding of ideas. This could be conceptualized as "waging good conflict," which means practicing radical respect for differences and being open to a variety of perspectives and engaging others without contempt or rankism. As we have seen in many fields, contempt and rankism drains energy away from the important work that needs to be done. Most people only know "conflict" as a form of war within a win/lose frame. "Waging good conflict," on the other side, is about being empathic and respectful, making room for authenticity, creating clarity, and growth.

Please see also:
- An Appreciative Frame: Beginning a Dialogue on Human Dignity and Humiliation, written by Linda in 2005
- Appreciative Facilitation: Hints for Round Table Moderators, written by Judith Thompson in February 2006 to support the moderators of our workshops
- Buddhist Teachings on Right Speech, which relate to our quest for appreciative enquiry, caring and being

 



List of Conveners

Evelin Gerda Lindner, Medical Doctor, Clinical and Social Psychologist, Ph.D. (Dr. med.), Ph.D. (Dr. psychol.), Organizer of the HumanDHS Conferences, Supporting the Local Conveners

Evelin G. Lindner is the Founding Director and President of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS). She is a transdisciplinary social scientist, and recipient of the 2006 SBAP Award, affiliated with the Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network, New York, the University of Oslo, Norway, Department of Psychology (folk.uio.no/evelinl/), and the Maison des Sciences de l'Homme, Paris. Lindner is also an Associate Professor at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim, Department of Psychology, Norway, and teaches globally, including in South East Asia, the Middle East, Australia, Africa, and other places globally. [read more]

Linda Hartling, Ph.D., Social Psychologist, Organizer of the HumanDHS Conferences, Supporting the Local Conveners

Linda M. Hartling, Ph.D., is the Associate Director, Jean Baker Miller Training Institute, Wellesley College, Boston, USA. She is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, HumanDHS Global Core Team, HumanDHS Global Coordinating Team, HumanDHS Research Team, and HumanDHS Education Team. She is the Editor of the Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (JHDHS).
Linda is affiliated with the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMTI) at the Stone Center, which is part of the Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College in Massachusetts. Until 2008, she was its Associate Director. Dr. Hartling is a member of the JBMTI theory-building group advancing the practice of the Relational-Cultural Theory, which is a new model of psychological development. In addition, Dr. Hartling coordinates and contributes to training programs, publications, and special projects for the JBMTI. She holds a doctoral degree in clinical/community psychology and has published papers on resilience, substance abuse prevention, shame and humiliation, relational practice in the workplace, and Relational-Cultural Theory. [read more]
Please see:
• Humiliation: Real Pain, A Pathway to Violence, the draft of Linda's paper for Round Table 2 of our 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York.
Humiliation: Assessing the Impact of Derision, Degradation, and Debasement, first published in The Journal of Primary Prevention, 19(4): 259-278, co-authored with T. Luchetta, 1999.
• Shame and Humiliation: From Isolation to Relational Transformation, the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMIT), Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College No. 88, Wellesley, MA 02481, co-authored with Wendy Rosen, Maureen Walker, Judith V. Jordan, 2000.
• Humiliation and Assistance: Telling the Truth About Power, Telling a New Story, paper prepared for the 5th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies 'Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People', in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.

Andrea Bartoli, Ph.D.

Andrea Bartoli is the Director of the Center for International Conflict Resolution (CICR); Chairman of the Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN). Andrea Bartoli has a Principle Host Place on the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board. He was a significant force behind this workshop series from its start.

 


 

Program

Day One, Thursday, December 14, 2006


9.15 am Registration Started



Please click in the middle of the pictures to see more photos.

10.00 am Welcoming All Participants

Donald Klein and Linda Hartling set the frame of our meetings within "Appreciative Enquiry" and we create a list of agreed upon norms having to do with the nature and tone of our dialogue. Please read An Appreciative Frame: Beginning a Dialogue on Human Dignity and Humiliation, that Linda has written for us in 2005.
Linda always keeps our workshop together with her continuous caring interventions, while Don's caring wisdom always saves our meetings in crucial moments!


Please click in the middle of the pictures to see more photos.

It is important to note that our appreciative frame is a HumanDHS-defined version of AI. We believe in "waging good conflict" (Jean Baker Miller). We believe that diverging opinions and perspectives need to be expressed and not avoided, because diversity enriches. However, diversity only enriches if embedded into mutual connection and appreciation. If not harnessed lovingly and caringly, diversity has the potential to humiliate, divide, create hostility, foster hatred, and even violence. In the spirit of our vision, we, the HumanDHS network, wish therefore to avoid the latter, and instead open up a space of common ground and mutually caring connections, a space for the safe expression of even the deepest differences and disagreements, and the toughest issues of humiliation, trauma, and injustice.

10.15 am Participants Presented Themselves



Please click in the middle of the pictures to see more photos.

 

11.00 am - 12.30 pm Introductory Presentation: Humiliation in a Globalizing World: Does Humiliation Become the Most Disruptive Force?

Evelin Lindner, Founder of HumanDHS
This talk highlighted how globalization is interlinked with new and unprecedented psychological dynamics that call for novel solutions at all levels - macro, meso and micro levels, and in all fields of public policy.
Please see the full paper here or at http://ssrn.com/abstract=668742 (this paper's SSRN ID is 668742)


Please click in the middle of the picture to see more photos.

12.30 pm - 1.15 pm Catered Lunch & Announcements



Please click in the middle of the pictures to see more photos.

Linda Hartling announced:
•  We have two yearly meetings, the Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict in December at Columbia University in NY, and an outside-of-the-US meeting. This year this meeting took place in Costa Rica.
•  We would be very happy if more people were to volunteer to help our rapporteurs!
• See here a “wish list” over ways to contribute to our work.
• On the “wish list” you see, for example, you see that we would like to carry out a Literature Review of Survey Instruments Relevant to Human Dignity and Humiliation.
• We would like to collect stories/cases/witness accounts of dignity and humiliation.
• We would like to seed our Call to Creativity with actual examples to encourage people to submit their own achievements and ideas.
• See also a list over our achievements.

Christopher Santee announced:
• Christopher announced our new Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies.

Philip Brown announced:
• Phil announced that we are invited to create "Humiliation in the Academic Setting," A Special Symposium Issue of Experiments in Education, published by the S.I.T.U. Council of Educational Research, India.

Evelin Lindner announced:
• Morton Deutsch's Second Edition of his Handbook of Conflict Resolution is out!
• Evelin accepted the 2006 SBAP prize in Zurich on behalf of the entire Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies network!
• We need a helper, somebody who would love to commit for a longer time period, who would have ample time (like half a day per day), who would know how to write appreciative emails, and how to maintain a website!
• We look for directors/coordinators for our Intervention projects. See for example our World Clothes for Equal Dignity project. Companies who are already in the fashion business, might be interested? See also our World Art for Equal Dignity project, where Peter Max offers us to paint portraits and give the 20,000 - 30,000 USD remuneration to us! Please find able people who wish to have a portrait by Peter Max!
• "Humiliation and History in Global Perspectives," A Special Issue of Social Alternatives (Vol. 25, No. 1, First Quarter, 2006), with Guest Editor Bertram Wyatt-Brown. To obtain a copy, please make a cheque to Social Alternatives for $20 ($10 for the journal and the extra $10 to cover postage) and sending it to Ralph Summy, Co-Editor Social Alternatives, Adjunct Professor, Australian Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies, University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia 4072.
• Evelin's new book is out: Making Enemies: Humiliation and International Conflict
• See also Evelin's chapters in edited books on her publications page. See, among others, "Humiliation or Dignity in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict," by Evelin G. Lindner, Neil Ryan Walsh & Judy Kuriansky, in Judy Kuriansky (Ed.), Terror in the Holy Land, Inside the Anguish of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.

1.15 pm - 3.00 pm Round Table 1: How Is Humiliation Relevant to Destructive Conflict?


Moderators: Donald Klein & Beth Fisher-Yoshida
Seating Manager: Rick Slaven
Notetakers/Rapporteurs Doris Brosnan, Tonya Hammer, Jessica Cichalski, Melissa Gage, Allison Nicole Buehler


Please click in the middle of the pictures to see more photos.

There are four ways to participate in a Round Table: As a discussant, a moderator, a note taker/rapporteur, and a supporter

We liked the Round Table discussion format we first used in our 2004 NY meeting. Everyone has ca. 10 minutes to present their entry point into the discussion, then we have an open discussion. We have 2 empty chairs in the circle that can be taken by participants from the audience who wish to introduce a question or comment.
We also liked the experience with two moderators for each Round Table. In that way, the moderators are not prevented from also being participants. While one moderator makes a contribution as a participant, the other takes over, and vice versa. With only one moderator, s/he would not be so flexible.
Please see Appreciative Facilitation: Hints for Round Table Moderators, kindly written in February 2006 by Judith Thompson to support the moderators of our workshops.

Participants:

•  Morton Deutsch
Destructive Conflict and Oppression
(2004)


•  Shibley Telhami (unfortunately, Shibley Telhami could not join us)
History and Humiliation (2003)

•  Clark McCauley
Author of Why Not Kill Them All? The Logic and Prevention of Mass Political Murder (Princeton University Press, 2006, together with Daniel Chirot)
Understanding Humiliation As Suppressed Anger (2006)

•  Arye Rattner
Surveying Humiliation (2006)

•  Michael Kimmel (unfortunately, Michael could not join us)
Men, Masculinity, and the Role of Humiliation
Supporter: Nick Martin
Exploring Possibilities for UPEACE in China: Peace Education, Project Development Report (2006)

•  Bertram Wyatt-Brown
The Psychology of Humiliation: Mann’s “Mario and the Magician” and Hawthorne’s “Major Molineux, My Kinsman” (2006)

•  Anne Wyatt-Brown
Humiliation in My Brother’s Image (2006)

Supporters (supporters participate by using the two empty chairs in each Round Table):

•  Thomas Scheff can unfortunately not be with us in person, but he kindly wishes to particpates in our workshop with two papers:
- Hypermasculinity and Violence as a Social System (2006)
- Silence and Mobilization: Emotional/Relational Dynamics (2006)

•  Monty Marshall
Third World War: The Role of Dignity and Humiliation (2006)

•  Pamela H. Creed
The Dominant American Narrative between 9/11/01 and the Invasion of Iraq (2006)

•  Michael Perlin
"Friend to the Martyr, a Friend to the Woman of Shame": Thinking About The Law and Humiliation (2006)

•  Michael Britton
Connecting the Deep Personal Experiences of Being in Historical Contexts with Reaching Outward Around the Globe (2006)

•  Christopher Santee
American Diversity and the Role of Humiliation (2006)

•  Dana L. Comstock

•  Dennis Rivers (due to illness, Dennis had to cancel in the last minute)
Citizens' Coalition to Reaffirm and Extend the Geneva Conventions (2006)

•  Kathleen Freis
Tolerance Education (2006)

•  Jinan Nakshabandi
Womens Empowerment (2006)

•  Brian Lynch
Silvan Tomkins' Conceptualization of Humiliation (2006)

•  Alyi Patrick Lalur (unfortunately, Patrick could not join us; he had an accident)
Childsoldiers' Humiliating Plight in Uganda (2006)

•  Tony Castleman
The Role of Human Recognition in Economic Development: Theory, Measurement, and Evidence (2006)

•  Sibyl Ann Schwarzenbach
Humiliation, Dignity and Friendship (2006)

•  Noel Mordana
Humiliation Politics (2004)

•  Melissa Gage
Different Types of Humiliation Elicit Different Emotional, Cognitive And Behavioral Reactions (2006)

• Rosita Albert
Violent Interethnic Conflict and Human Dignity: Major Issues in Intercultural Research and Knowledge Utilization (2006)

• Jessica Cichalski
The Role of Dignity versus Humiliation for Public Policy (2006)

•  Grace Feuerverger
The "School For Peace": A Conflict Resolution Program in a Jewish-Palestinian Village (2005)

•  Julie Strentzsch
The Role of Dignity and Humiliation in Community Counseling (2006)

•  Manal Radwan
Jihadist Narratives: Humiliation and the Politics of the Other (2006)

•  Doris Brosnan
(2006)

•  Allison Nicole Buehler
Initial Perceptions of Labels to Initial Perceptions of Common Humanity: A Paradigm Shift in the Disability Field (2004)

•  Olga Botcharova
The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Conflict Management and Cross-Cultural Communications (2006)

•  Nicholas Diehl
The Role of Dignity and Humiliation in the Organizational Context (2006)

•  Alison Anthoine
The Role of Dignity and Humiliation in the Delivery of Healthcare Services (2006)

•  Nick Kappelhof
How Humiliation and Shame May Undermine Education Reform Efforts (2006)

•  Ariel Lublin
Fostering Connection and Positive Outcomes through Appreciation and Optimism (2006)

The History of Round Table 1:

Round Table 1, 2005
Round Table 1 in 2005 was entitled What's Relevant in Destructive Conflict?
The moderators were Beth Fisher-Yoshida & Miriam Marton
Please see the participants and their contributions here.

Round Table 1, 2004
Round Table 1 in 2004 was entitled What's Relevant in Destructive Conflict?

The moderator was Beth Fisher-Yoshida
Please see the participants here.

3.15 pm - 5.00 pm What Now?
Moderators: Linda Hartling and Evelin Lindner
Invitees: Arye Rattner, Floyd Webster Rudmin, Brian Lynch
Notetakers/Rapporteurs Doris Brosnan, Tonya Hammer, Jessica Cichalski, Melissa Gage, Allison Nicole Buehler



Arye Rattner. Please click in the middle of the picture to see it larger.

We discussed possible and necessary routes of action.

Ideas for next year: We would like to use the time at the end of each day to do two things:
1. It would be great if every Round Table could make a summary of their proceedings, which we then could post on our website.
2. It would be great if we could engage in collective planning about how to cooperate during the year, until we meet again in 2008. We could develop timelines with goals for accomplishing specific projects, projects we came up with in our Round Tables, for example. Among others, this would enable us to assess our progress along the way. Please see, for example, the HumanDHS' Work: Objectives and Evidence of Success, developed in cooperation betwen HumanDHS and ABSF.

Suggestions for public policy making (see also our Public Policy for Equal Dignity project):
Many suggested at our 2005 meeting that we need to find a way to measure humiliation in societies so that we can show to policy makers that humiliation is relevant and needs to be included into public policy making. Ultimately, all institutions (from marriage to the United Nations) need scrutiny and restructuring so as to prevent that they have humiliating effects. Linda suggests that we have a look at Surveymonkey.com, a company that facilitates the design, collection, and analysis of survey data over the Internet. We could, for example, start with making open-ended questions about the experience of humiliation to post on this site, and then develop a questionnaire? 

5.00 pm End of the Closed Part of Day One of Our Workshop

 

5.00 pm - 8.00 pm Public Reception at Milbank Chapel with Eminent Scholars and Leading Thinkers. Everybody Was Invited!

 

•  5.00-5.30 pm Reception
We Had Refreshments! We Mingled and Met!

•  Please see here 2005's Public Event Program
•  Please see here 2004's Public Event Program

•  5.30-5.45 pm World Religions and Equal Dignity: An Homage with Voice

Cybele focused our minds and prepared us for the following talks.


Please click in the middle of the picture to see more photos.

•  5.45-6.00 pm Linda Hartling Welcomed Everybody

 

6.00 pm - 6.30 pm Honored Presentation History and Humiliation

Shibley Telhami (unfortunately, Shibley Telhami could not join us)
History and Humiliation (2003)
Please see furthermore How The Fighting Stops: Achieving a Sustainable Ceasefire in Lebanon, to which Shibley Telhami explains (August 3, 2006): "You may note that in my most recent comment on Lebanon at the Brookings Institution, which was televised in the US, I highlighted the issue of humiliation and suggested that the solution to the problem must be based on a balance between deterrence on the one hand and dignity on the other. The discussion could be watched on video or be read at www.brookings.edu. The transcript can be accessed directly at: http://brookings.edu/comm/events/20060731.pdf."

•  6.30-8.00 pm Panel & Discussion

15 minute presentations by panelists followed by an open discussion with all of the evening speakers


Please click in the middle of the picture to see more photos.

•  Social Exclusion, Humiliation, and Shame

Hilary Silver, Professor of Sociology and Urban Studies at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Hilary Silver is Associate Professor of Sociology and Urban Studies at Brown University, where she has taught since receiving her Ph.D. in Sociology at Columbia. Professor Silver has published widely on the topic of "social exclusion," especially for international organizations such as the International Labour Office, World Bank, Inter-American Development Bank, and currently, the Wolfensohn Center at the Brookings Institution. Her empirical research on social exclusion has been conducted at the grassroots neighborhood level in such cities as Paris, Berlin, and of course, Providence, Rhode Island. Her talk today is entitled "Social Exclusion, Humiliation, and Shame."
Please see also:
Hilary Silver & S.M. Miller (2003)
Social Exclusion: The European Approach to Social Disadvantage
Indicators, 2 (2, Spring), pp. 1-17

•  The Humiliation Dynamic: Looking Back... Looking Forward

Donald Klein, Union Institute and University, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. Donald Klein is a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and Global Core Team.

•  Humiliation-Shame Dynamics

Carlos Sluzki, Professor at the College of Health and Human Services and at the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, George Mason University; Clinical Professor at the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, George Washington University Medical School.

•  Men, Masculinity, and the Role of Humiliation

(unfortunately, Michael could not join us)

Michael Kimmel, Professor of Sociology at State University of New York, Stony Brook. Michael Kimmel is a sociologist who studies gender and masculinity. For the past three years, under the auspices of the Carnegie Endowment, he has been studying the extreme right in the U.S and Scandinavia, and comparing them to the terrorists of Al Qaeda. He has found similar sorts of complaints and similar backgrounds, and similar claims about the restoration of manhood -- a theme missing from much of the discussion of humiliation -- that it is a decidedly gendered phenomenon.

•  Humiliation in a Globalizing World: Does Humiliation Become the Most Disruptive Force?

Evelin Lindner, Founding Director and President of HumanDHS
This talk highlights how globalization is interlinked with new and unprecedented psychological dynamics that call for novel solutions at all levels - macro, meso and micro levels, and in all fields of public policy.
Please see the full paper here or at http://ssrn.com/abstract=668742 (this paper's SSRN ID is 668742)

•  8.00 pm End of our Public Event!

 



Day Two, Friday, December 15, 2006

 

10.00 am Welcoming All Participants

Andrea Bartoli, Ph.D., Director of the Center for International Conflict Resolution (CICR) and Chairman of the Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN) welcomed the participants.


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10.30 am - 11.15 am The Humiliation Dynamic: Looking Back... Looking Forward

Donald Klein, Union Institute and University, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. Donald Klein is a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and Global Core Team.


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11.15 pm - 1.15 pm Round Table 2: How Can the Notion of Humiliation Be Useful for Public Policy Planning and for Cultivating Positive Social Change?

 
There are four ways to participate in a Round Table: As a discussant, a moderator, a note taker/rapporteur, and a supporter.
 
Moderators: Maggie O'Neill & Philip Brown
Seating Managers: Rick Slaven & Miriam Marton
Notetakers/Rapporteurs Doris Brosnan, Tonya Hammer, Jessica Cichalski, Melissa Gage, Allison Nicole Buehler


Please click in the middle of the picture to see more photos.

Participants:

•  Beth Fisher-Yoshida
Reframing Conflict: Intercultural Conflict as Potential Transformation (2005)

•  Maria Volpe
The Association for Conflict Resolution Crisis Intervention online newsletter featured this presentation in its 2006 February issue.

•  Arie Nadler
Intergroup Helping as Status Relations: Effects of Status Stability, Identification, and Type of Help on Receptivity to High-Status Group’s Help (2006)

•  Robert Kolodny
A Gestalt Perspective on Shame and Humiliation (2006)

•  Gay Rosenblum-Kumar
Humiliation, Conflict and Public Policy (2004)
Horizontal Inequality and Humiliation: Public Policy for Disaffection or Cohesion? (2005)

•  Jennifer Goldman (unfortunately, Jennifer could not join us)
Humiliation and Aggression (2006)
A Theoretical Understanding of How Emotions Fuel Intractable Conflict: The Case of Humiliation (2005, together with Peter T. Coleman)

•  Charles Knight
Security in the Great Transition (2006)
Role of Humiliation in Enforcing Conventional Masculinity Learning and Behavior (2006)

•  Judy Kuriansky
Transforming Conflict and Humiliation to Heal Hearts in the Holy Land: People-to-People Projects to Build Peace, Coexistence and Cooperation between Palestinians and Israelis (2006)

•  Andrea Bartoli
Deconstructing International Deadly Conflicts (2004)

Supporters (supporters participate by using the two empty chairs in each Round Table):

•  Thomas Scheff can unfortunately not be with us in person, but he kindly wishes to particpates in our workshop with two papers:
- Hypermasculinity and Violence as a Social System (2006)
- Silence and Mobilization: Emotional/Relational Dynamics (2006)

•  Arye Rattner

•  Pamela H. Creed
The Dominant American Narrative between 9/11/01 and the Invasion of Iraq (2006)

•  Nora Femenia
Emotional Actor: Foreign Policy Decision-Making in the 1982 Falklands/Malvinas War

•  Christopher Santee
American Diversity and the Role of Humiliation (2006)

•  Anie Kalayjian
Turkish Denial of the Genocide of Armenians, Greeks, Assyrians: Transforming Humiliation into Understanding and Forgiveness (2005)

•  Michael Britton
Connecting the Deep Personal Experiences of Being in Historical Contexts with Reaching Outward Around the Globe (2006)

•  Dana L. Comstock

•  Dennis Rivers (due to illness, Dennis had to cancel in the last minute)
Citizens' Coalition to Reaffirm and Extend the Geneva Conventions (2006)

•  Kathleen Freis
Tolerance Education (2006)

•  Jinan Nakshabandi
Womens Empowerment (2006)

•  Brian Lynch
Silvan Tomkins' Conceptualization of Humiliation (2006)

•  Alyi Patrick Lalur (unfortunately, Patrick could not join us; he had an accident)
Childsoldiers' Humiliating Plight in Uganda (2006)

•  Tony Castleman (unfortunately, Tony had to cancel in the last minute for Day Two)
The Role of Human Recognition in Economic Development: Theory, Measurement, and Evidence (2006)

•  Sibyl Ann Schwarzenbach
Humiliation, Dignity and Friendship (2006)

•  Noel Mordana
Humiliation Politics (2004)

•  Melissa Gage
Different Types of Humiliation Elicit Different Emotional, Cognitive And Behavioral Reactions (2006)

• Rosita Albert
Violent Interethnic Conflict and Human Dignity: Major Issues in Intercultural Research and Knowledge Utilization (2006)

• Jessica Cichalski
The Role of Dignity versus Humiliation for Public Policy (2006)

•  Grace Feuerverger
The "School For Peace": A Conflict Resolution Program in a Jewish-Palestinian Village (2005)

•  Miriam Marton
The Dual Humiliation of Female Refugees by Sexually Violent, Gender-based Acts (2005)

•  Julie Strentzsch
The Role of Dignity and Humiliation in Community Counseling (2006)

•  Manal Radwan
Jihadist Narratives: Humiliation and the Politics of the Other (2006)

•  Doris Brosnan
(2006)

•  Allison Nicole Buehler
Initial Perceptions of Labels to Initial Perceptions of Common Humanity: A Paradigm Shift in the Disability Field (2004)

•  Olga Botcharova
The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Conflict Management and Cross-Cultural Communications (2006)

•  Nicholas Diehl
The Role of Dignity and Humiliation in the Organizational Context (2006)

•  Alison Anthoine
The Role of Dignity and Humiliation in the Delivery of Healthcare Services (2006)

•  Nick Kappelhof
How Humiliation and Shame May Undermine Education Reform Efforts (2006)

•  Ariel Lublin
Fostering Connection and Positive Outcomes through Appreciation and Optimism (2006)

The History of Round Table 2:

Round Table 2, 2005
The title of Round Table 2 in 2005 was Is Humiliation Relevant in Destructive Conflict?
The moderators were Judith Thompson & Manas Ghanem
Please see the participants and their contributions here

Round Table 2, 2004
The title of Round Table 2 in 2004 was Is Humiliation Relevant in Destructive Conflict?

The moderators were: Carlos Sluzki & Donald C. Klein
Please see the participants and their contributions here

1.15 pm - 2.00 pm Catered Lunch & Announcements

 

2.00 pm - 4.00 pm Round Table 3: What works? What types of social change efforts show promise in reducing violent conflict and humiliation while upholding the dignity of all people?

 
There are four ways to participate in a Round Table: As a discussant, a moderator, a note taker/rapporteur, and a supporter.

 

Moderators: Nora Femenia & Kathleen Freis
Seating Managers: Rick Slaven & Miriam Marton
Notetakers/Rapporteurs Doris Brosnan, Tonya Hammer, Jessica Cichalski, Melissa Gage, Allison Nicole Buehler


Please click in the middle of the picture to see more photos.

Participants:

•  Carlos E. Sluzki
- Elements of Humiliation-Shame Dynamics for Computational Modeling and Analysis of Real-Life Scenarios (2004)
- The Story of the Crying Composer told at the Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, NY (2004)
- Humiliation Therapeutics (powerpoint presentation, 2004)

•  Sara Cobb
"Humiliation" as Positions in Narratives: Implications for Policy Development (2004)

•  Floyd Webster Rudmin
Preventing Inadvertent Humiliation (2006)
Six Research Designs on Humiliation (2005)

•  James E. Jones
The Post Victim Ethical Exemption Syndrome: An Outgrowth of Humiliation (2006)
The Third Force: A Practical, Community-Building: Approach to Settling Destructive Conflicts (2004)

•  Florina Benoit & Gladston Xavier (Ashok) (unfortunately, Florina and her husband could not join us)
Sri Lankan Refugees: Types of Social Change Efforts That Show Promise  in Reducing Violent Conflict and Humiliation (2006)

•  Barry Hart
Peacebuilding for Traumatized Societies - With an Emphasis on the Role of Large-Scale Humiliation and How to Deal With It through Trauma Recovery and Peacebuilding Processes (2006)

Maggie O'Neill
Re-Imagining Diaspora through Ethno-Mimesis: Humiliation, Human Dignity and Belonging (2006)
Forced Migration, Humiliation and Human Dignity: Re-Imagining the Asylum-Migration Nexus through Participatory Action Research (PAR) (2006)
What About Me - The Needs of Refugee/Asylum Mothers and their Children
(2006)
and
Theorising Narratives of Exile and Belonging: The Importance of Biography and Ethno-mimesis in "Understanding" Asylum (2006)

Sarah Sayeed (representing also Virginia Swain) (unfortunately, Virginia and Sarah could not join us)
A Leadership and Practice to Reconcile Challenges in a Post-September 11th World, Virginia Swain and Sarah Sayeed 2006
Reconciliation as Policy: A Capacity-Building Proposal for Renewing Leadership and Development, Virginia Swain and Sarah Sayeed 2005

•  Anie Kalayjian
Turkish Denial of the Genocide of Armenians, Greeks, Assyrians: Transforming Humiliation into Understanding and Forgiveness (2005)

Supporters (supporters participate by using the two empty chairs in each Round Table):

•  Thomas Scheff can unfortunately not be with us in person, but he kindly wishes to particpates in our workshop with two papers:
- Hypermasculinity and Violence as a Social System (2006)
- Silence and Mobilization: Emotional/Relational Dynamics (2006)

•  Arye Rattner

•  Pamela H. Creed
The Dominant American Narrative between 9/11/01 and the Invasion of Iraq (2006)

•  Christopher Santee
American Diversity and the Role of Humiliation (2006)

•  Michael Britton
Connecting the Deep Personal Experiences of Being in Historical Contexts with Reaching Outward Around the Globe (2006)

•  Grace Feuerverger
The "School For Peace": A Conflict Resolution Program in a Jewish-Palestinian Village (2005)

•  Dana L. Comstock

•  Dennis Rivers (due to illness, Dennis had to cancel in the last minute)
Citizens' Coalition to Reaffirm and Extend the Geneva Conventions (2006)

•  Kathleen Freis
Tolerance Education (2006)

•  Jinan Nakshabandi
Womens Empowerment (2006)

•  Brian Lynch
Silvan Tomkins' Conceptualization of Humiliation (2006)

•  Alyi Patrick Lalur (unfortunately, Patrick could not join us; he had an accident)
Childsoldiers' Humiliating Plight in Uganda (2006)

•  Tony Castleman (unfortunately, Tony had to cancel in the last minute for Day Two)
The Role of Human Recognition in Economic Development: Theory, Measurement, and Evidence (2006)

•  Noel Mordana
Humiliation Politics (2004)

•  Melissa Gage
Different Types of Humiliation Elicit Different Emotional, Cognitive And Behavioral Reactions (2006)

• Rosita Albert
Violent Interethnic Conflict and Human Dignity: Major Issues in Intercultural Research and Knowledge Utilization (2006)

• Jessica Cichalski
The Role of Dignity versus Humiliation for Public Policy (2006)

•  Miriam Marton
The Dual Humiliation of Female Refugees by Sexually Violent, Gender-based Acts (2005)

•  Julie Strentzsch
The Role of Dignity and Humiliation in Community Counseling (2006)

•  Manal Radwan
Jihadist Narratives: Humiliation and the Politics of the Other (2006)

•  Doris Brosnan
(2006)

•  Allison Nicole Buehler
Initial Perceptions of Labels to Initial Perceptions of Common Humanity: A Paradigm Shift in the Disability Field (2004)

•  Olga Botcharova
The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Conflict Management and Cross-Cultural Communications (2006)

•  Nicholas Diehl
The Role of Dignity and Humiliation in the Organizational Context (2006)

•  Alison Anthoine
The Role of Dignity and Humiliation in the Delivery of Healthcare Services (2006)

•  Nick Kappelhof
How Humiliation and Shame May Undermine Education Reform Efforts (2006)

•  Ariel Lublin
Fostering Connection and Positive Outcomes through Appreciation and Optimism (2006)

The History of Round Table 3:

Round Table 3, 2005
The title of Round Table 3 in 2005 was Can the Notion of Humiliation Be Useful for Public Policy Planning? What Can We Envisage As Best Practice Models?
The moderators were Annette Engler, Ana Ljubinkovic & Miriam Marton
Please see the participants and their contributions here

Round Table 3, 2004
The title of Round Table 3 in 2004 was Can the Notion of Humiliation Be Useful for Public Policy Planning? What Can We Envisage As Best Practice Models?
The moderators were Donald C. Klein & Linda Hartling
Please see the participants and their contributions here

4.00 pm - 5.30 pm What Now?
Moderators: Linda Hartling and Evelin Lindner
Inviter: Arye Rattner
Notetakers/Rapporteurs Doris Brosnan, Tonya Hammer, Jessica Cichalski, Melissa Gage, Allison Nicole Buehler

We invited interested participants to support Arye Ratner's efforts to include a measurement of humiliation into his projects.

Ideas for next year: We would like to use the time at the end of each day to do two things:
1. It would be great if every Round Table could make a summary of their proceedings, which we then could post on our website.
2. It would be great if we could engage in collective planning about how to cooperate during the year, until we meet again in 2008. We could develop timelines with goals for accomplishing specific projects, projects we came up with in our Round Tables, for example. Among others, this would enable us to assess our progress along the way. Please see, for example, the HumanDHS' Work: Objectives and Evidence of Success, developed in cooperation betwen HumanDHS and ABSF.

4.00 pm - 5.00 pm Wrapping up Day Two of Our Workshop

 

5.00 pm End of Day Two of our workshop


Please click in the middle of the pictures to see more photos.


 

List of Participants
(in all NY workshops so far)

•  Morton Deutsch, Director Emeritus & E.L. Thorndike Professor Emeritus, International Center for Cooperation & Conflict Resolution, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, USA. Morton Deutsch has a Principle Host Place on the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
His paper for our 2004 workshop, Oppression and Conflict, was first presented at the Interrupting Oppression and Sustaining Justice Working Conference at ICCCR, NY, February 27-29, 2004. Please see here his Foreword to Lindner's Book on Humiliation.

•  David A. Hamburg is President Emeritus of Carnegie Corporation of New York. David A. Hamburg is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Please see Learning to Live Together (2004), and the videos of his talk at the Public Event of our 2005 workshop: Education and Humiliation (2005).
David A. Hamburg kindly wrote (June 28, 2005): I appreciate very much your invitation to participate in your conference December 15-16, 2005, at Columbia University, Teachers College. I would, indeed, like to attend. I was not able to do so previously. I am not sure I can be there both days, but at least for one.
I am certainly interested in the basic question your raise as to whether humiliation is relevant to destructive conflict. By the same token, I am interested in the question whether humiliation can be useful in formulating public policy, as well as the matter of best practice models. You challenge all of us in the conflict field in a most constructive way. So, please keep me posted, and I look forward to what will undoubtedly be an important occasion. David.

•  Shibley Telhami, University of Maryland, USA. Shibley Telhami is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board. Professor Telhami has written a piece on "History and Humiliation," in The Washington Post, Friday, March 28, 2003, and has written about humiliation in The Stakes: America and the Middle East (Westview Press, 2003; updated version, 2004) which was selected by Foreign Affairs as one of the top five books on the Middle East in 2003.
Please see furthermore How The Fighting Stops: Achieving a Sustainable Ceasefire in Lebanon, to which Shibley Telhami explains (03/08/2006): "You may note that in my most recent comment on Lebanon at the Brookings Institution, which was televised in the US, I highlighted the issue of humiliation and suggested that the solution to the problem must be based on a balance between deterrence on the one hand and dignity on the other. The discussion could be watched on video or be read at www.brookings.edu. The transcript can be accessed directly at http://brookings.edu/comm/events/20060731.pdf."

•  Alan B. Slifka, New York investment manager and philanthropist, founder of the Coexistence Initiative (Brandeis University). His topic for our 2005 workshop was Feeling at Home, Or Not, Depending on Humiliation (2005).

•  Arye Rattner, Professor Arye Rattner, Director of the Center for the Study of Crime Law & Society
University of Haifa.

•  Jennifer Goldman, International Center for Cooperation & Conflict Resolution, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, USA. Jennifer Goldman is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team and the Research Team.
Jennifer kindly wrote (June 16, 2005): I support the idea of connecting the theory with practical application, and urge us to think about how what we’re researching and writing about can be applied in real world settings. It could be helpful for us to choose one or a few real world situations that are relevant for people’s work (for example, the situation at Abu Ghraib; or on-going problems of humiliations occurring at national and international boundaries, i.e. airport and road checkpoints in all parts of the world, from the U.S., to Tibet/China, to Israel/Palestine; or workplace-based humiliation) and use the examples to ground our discussions about theory and research... It could also be useful to make distinctions between different types of humiliation, such as individual-level, collective-level, etc. or humiliation that occurs within different settings, such as workplace, international, etc., and to have break-out sessions that focus on those topics.
Structurally, it could make sense to meet all day Thurs, and a half-day on Friday, so we can end on a strong note with most people in attendance on Friday (and perhaps to add an informal dinner on Wed night to extend the social time for those who could make it).
Jennifer kindly wrote (August 29, 2005): Dear Evelin, I hope you're doing well! I've done a bit of brainstorming for topics for the conference, and thought I'd forward them to you (I mentioned these to Peter and Beth as well). Best, Jennifer
Some ideas for small groups/topics for the humiliation conference:
1.
- Does culture affect how people experience humiliating events? If so, how?
- What role do collectivistic vs. individualistic cultures play in how people experience humiliating events?
- Do people's behavioral reactions to humiliation differ depending on whether the humiliation is aimed at them individually versus collectively (i.e., an affront against one's person vs. an affront against one's group)? If so, how might their behavioral reactions differ? (e.g., would one type of humiliation lead people to be respond more aggressively than another?)
2.
- What role do social norms play in how people react, emotionally and behaviorally, to humiliating events?
- What role do social norms play in how people recall, or remember, humiliating events?
3.
- To what degree is humiliation an "identity forming" emotion?
4.
- How does the construct of humiliation differ from the constructs of shame, guilt, embarrassment and other similar emotions?
5.
Methodological considerations:
- How can effective and efficient studies of humiliation be acheived through different methodologies?
- What considerations need to be taken into account when studying humiliation in the field? In the lab? In survey studies?
- How can we simulate studies on humiliation in the lab setting? What are the IRB issues involved?
Please see:
- Peter T. Coleman and Jennifer Goldman, Conflict and Humiliation, note presented at the 2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, November 18-19, 2004.
- How Humiliation Fuels Intractable Conflict: The Effects of Emotional Roles on Recall and Reactions to Conflictual Encounters by Jennifer S. Goldman and Peter T. Coleman, work in progress, Teachers College, Columbia University, 2005.
- A Theoretical Understanding of How Emotions Fuel Intractable Conflict: The Case of Humiliation by Jennifer S. Goldman and Peter T. Coleman (2005), paper presented at Round Table 2 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.
- Humiliation and Aggression, abstract prepared by Jennifer Goldman for Round Table 2 of the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

•  Beth Fisher-Yoshida, Associate Director, International Center for Cooperation & Conflict Resolution, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, USA. Beth Fisher-Yoshida is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Beth kindly served as Moderator for our Round Table 1 "What's relevant in a destructive conflict?" in the 2004 and 2005 workshops. Beth furthermore kindly served as Moderator for our Round Table 1 "How is humiliation relevant to destructive conflict?" in our 2006 workshop.
•  Nicholas Kappelhof is an Ed.M. student at Teachers College in the department of Organization and Leadership. His concentration is in public school leadership with a specific concern for urban school reform. For the past five years he has taught English Language Arts grades 7-12 in Brooklyn and in the San Francisco Bay Area. Nicholas comes to this workshop looking to explore how issues of humiliation and shame may undermine contemporary education reform efforts and how a greater sense of dignity can be cultivated in struggling urban communities through compassionate educational opportunities. Please see How Humiliation and Shame May Undermine Education Reform Efforts, note presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict.

•  Janet Gerson, Acting Director of the Peace Education Center at Teachers College, Columbia University, USA. Janet Gerson is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.

•  Tony Jenkins, Peace Education Center, Teachers College, Columbia University, USA.
Tony Jenkins is an Academic Advisor on the HumanDHS Research Team, for our upcoming Terrorism and Humiliation Project and our upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. He is also a Member of our Education Team.

•  Judy Kuriansky, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist with a Ph.D. from N.Y.U. Judy is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board. She is currently teaching in the Department of Clinical Psychology at Columbia University Teachers College, and at Columbia Medical School, where she coordinates international training programs. A Fellow of the American Psychological Association, Dr. Judy is an NGO representative to the United Nations for two international organizations - the International Association of Applied Psychology and the World Council for Psychotherapy. She works extensively throughout the world giving workshops on healthy relationship as well as on peace, tolerance and trauma recovery, including after 9'11 in America. Honored for her work after 9'11, she was featured in the Red Cross campaign, and as a spokesperson for the American consulate abroad. She has provided mental health support after disasters worldwide, like SARS in China, an earthquake in Australia, tensions in Serbia, bombings in Jerusalem, and most recently with Dr. Anie Kalayjian and the Mental Health Outreach Program in Sri Lanka after the tsunami. They co-moderated a workshop, "Achieving Collective Security:  Partnerships to prevent fear, violence, genocide and terrorism through targeting the MDG goals" at the 58 th Annual Conference for Non-Governmental Organizations at the United Nations this past September.
In her extensive international work, Dr. Judy is also a visiting professor at Peking University Health Sciences Center in Beijing China and the Department of Psychiatry at Hong Kong University. In China many times a year, she consults for the China Center for Reproductive Health Instruction in Shanghai, and trains doctors all over China, and appears often on China 's CCTV. She gives workshops on AIDS prevention for teens, couples counseling, and plenary addresses on peace and trauma recovery, around the world from India to Dubai and recently in Tehran, Iran, and at meetings on the State of the World Forum, and has been awarded the first "International Outreach award" from the American Women in Radio and TV. Trained in Buddhist shamanism, she has developed unique therapeutic interventions integrating eastern and western traditions. Author of innumerable articles in professional journals and over 10 books on dating and relationships translated in many languages, like the "Complete Idiots Guide to A Healthy Relationships, Dr. Judy has contributed psychological chapters to "Access: Emergency Survival Handbook," and is currently working on a book about Healing between Palestinians and Israelis from a psychosocial point of view, to be published by Praeger Press. 
Also a journalist, and well-known as "Dr. Judy" to millions of fans from her nightly radio advice shows for over 22 years, she has also been a TV reporter on CBS-TV, hosted a show "Money and Emotions" on CNBC TV, and been a guest on innumerable news and talk shows from Oprah to Larry King, Court TV, and CNN. In print she has been a columnist for the Chicago Trubune Womens News, the Los Angeles Times syndicate, Advertising Age and Boardroom Reports, and currently writes advice columns for the New York Daily News, the Singapore Straits Times and China 's Trends Health Magazine. She has been featured in publications from People Magazine to Cosmopolitan and the New York Times.
Please see the note Judy presented at Round Table 2 of our 2005 workshop: Psychosocial Aspects of the Israeli/Palestinian Conflict. Please see also the abstract Judy presented at Round Table 2 of our 2006 workshop: Transforming Conflict and Humiliation to Heal Hearts in the Holy Land: People-to-People Projects to Build Peace, Coexistence and Cooperation between Palestinians and Israelis.

•  Maria Volpe, Professor and Director, CUNY Dispute Resolution Consortium, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, The City University of New York, USA. Maria is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Maria kindly wrote (June 11, 2005): Dear Evelin....Great hearing from you. I have marked my calendar so I can participate in the Workshop this year. I am looking forward to it and seeing you again. Did you want the workshop posted on the NYC-DR listserv? Not sure if this is an event by invitation or if it is open to those who are interested. Let me know....With warmest regards, maria.
Maria gave the following presentation at our 2005 workshop: Conflict and Humiliation: The Simplicities of Reversing Destructive Conflict. The Association for Conflict Resolution Crisis Intervention online newsletter featured this presentation in its 2006 February issue.

•  Donald Klein, Union Institute and University, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. Donald Klein is a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and Global Core Team. He has furthermore been the Director of our Education Team since 2001.
Please see here Community MetaFunctions and the Humiliation Dynamic, a paper that Don presented at ou 2nd Annual Meeting on Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, Paris, France, September 16-18, 2004.
Please see also
Appreciative Psychology: An Antidote to Humiliation, a final paper Don presented at our 2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, November 18-19, 2004. Please see here also The Humiliation Dynamic: Looking to the Past and Future, the paper that Don presents at the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005. Please see also his New Years Greetings: 2006!
Don kindly wrote (July 4, 2005): Hello, Evelin -- I agree that the roundtable approach worked very well and should prove to be equally profitable at the December 2005 meeting. The Open Space approach is not something, however, that will work well if "tucked in" between scheduled sessions that have been preplanned. To be successful, Open Space requires a general over-all topic that is of interest and importance to all participants. It needs at least a full day, during which there can be three or four rounds of discussion groups on aspects of the general topic that are proposed by participants themselves. If we were to use Open Space, an overall topic that would be of great interest to me has to do with developing effective approaches to dealing with those groups and nations that inflict humiliation on other groups or nations. I'm thinking, for example, of humiliation experienced by Palestinians at Israeli hands, of Irish Catholics' experience of humiliation at Proestant Catholic hands, and of Muslim experience of humiliation at the hands of Christian nations.
I realize that the same overall topic would lend itself to a series of Round Tables similar to the approach we used last year. The Round Table approach has the advantage of making it possible to ask one or more people to develop in advance brief papers that would stimulate subsequent discussion. If one goal is to publish a book of papers and discussions froom the annual conferences, then the Round Table approach seems preferable.
Another topic that would lend itself to Round Table discussions has to do with educational approaches to reducing or eliminating humiliation and promiting human dignity, including, for example, Round Tables on creating humiliation free environments for the education of children, use of media for public education on promoting human dignity, and inter-group methods for dealing with humiliating intercommunal conflicts.
I also want to add the following possible option, suggested by Alan. If we decide to organize the conference around an Open Space Design, it would still be possible to encourage people (perhaps to get specific commitments from certain ones) to prepare working papers in advance of the conference. These papers might be circulated in advance via internet and also be available at the conference as hard copies. In this way, participants would have the chance to be informed on certain topics, which later individuals might select for the spontaneous discussion groups that are so important to the Open Space design. With love, Don.

•  Rebecca Klein, A graduate of Hampshire College, USA. Rebecca Klein is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team.
Becca is Don's daughter and very kindly maintains our internal database. She has, furthemore, with breathtaking efficiency, prepared the notes for all our past meetings. Unfortunately, she could not be with us in Costa Rica and in our 2006 workshop!

•  Alan Klein, Ellicott City, MD, USA.
Alan Klein supports HumanDHS's work. He is Don's son and Becca's father and has kindly facilitated the "Open Space" Session in our 2004 workshop and our Costa Rica meeting.

• Linda Hartling, Jean Baker Miller Training Institute, Wellesley College, Boston, USA. Linda Hartling is a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, Global Core Team, and Education Team.
Please see here:
- Hartling, Linda M., Luchetta, T. (1999), Humiliation: Assessing the Impact of Derision, Degradation, and Debasement, First Published by: The Journal of Primary Prevention, 19(4): 259-278.
- Hartling, Linda M., Wendy Rosen, Maureen Walker, Judith V. Jordan (2000), Shame and Humiliation: From Isolation to Relational Transformation, The Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMIT), Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College No. 88, Wellesley, MA 02481.
- Hartling, Linda M. (2005), An Appreciative Frame: Beginning a Dialogue on Human Dignity and Humiliation, introductory text presented at "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.
- Hartling, Linda M. (2005), Humiliation and Assistance: Telling the Truth About Power, Telling a New Story, paper presented at "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.
- Hartling, Linda M. (2005), Humiliation: Real Pain, A Pathway to Violence, preliminary draft of a paper presented at Round Table 2 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.
- Jordan, Judith, and Hartling, Linda M. (2006), Relationship Tips, Jean Baker Miller Training Institute.
- Hartling, Linda M. (2006), From Humiliation to Appreciation: Walking Toward Our Talk, abstract presented at the Second International Conference on Multicultural Discourses, 13-15th April 2007, Institute of Discourse and Cultural Studies, & Department of Applied Psychology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, as part of the 9th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies.

•  Richard Slaven, Brandeis University, Massachusetts, USA. Richard Slaven is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and a Member of the HumanDHS Planning Committee. Rick most kindly supports all our meetings. We cannot imagine having a meeting without his help!

•  Hilary Silver, Professor of Sociology and Urban Studies at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Hilary Silver is Associate Professor of Sociology and Urban Studies at Brown University, where she has taught since receiving her Ph.D. in Sociology at Columbia. Professor Silver has published widely on the topic of "social exclusion," especially for international organizations such as the International Labour Office, World Bank, Inter-American Development Bank, and currently, the Wolfensohn Center at the Brookings Institution. Her empirical research on social exclusion has been conducted at the grassroots neighborhood level in such cities as Paris, Berlin, and of course, Providence, Rhode Island. Her talk today is entitled "Social Exclusion, Humiliation, and Shame."
Please see also: Hilary Silver & S.M. Miller (2003), Social Exclusion: The European Approach to Social Disadvantage, Indicators, 2 (2, Spring), pp. 1-17.

•  Victoria C. Fontan, is the Director of Academic Development, and Assistant Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies at the United Nations-mandated University for Peace in San Jose, Costa Rica. As a Fellow to the Iraq Project at the CICR in Columbia University, Victoria is in charge of developing a permanent Conflict Resolution curriculum in northern Iraqi universities.
Victoria Fontan is a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, and a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team, and the Research Team.
Victoria has kindly taken upon her the task to be the editor of our new journal, and to develop edited books with your contributions.
Victoria is also a researcher in our upcoming Terrorism and Humiliation Project. The title of her 2008 book is Voices from Post-Saddam Iraq: Living with Terrorism, Insurgency, and New Forms of Tyranny (Westport, CT: Greenwood/Praeger Security International).
Please see furthermore The Dialectics of Humiliation: Polarization between Occupier and Occupied in Post-Saddam Iraq, unpublished draft (not to be cited without author's authorization).

•  Bertram Wyatt-Brown and
•  Anne Wyatt-Brown, University of Florida, now Baltimore, USA. Bertram Wyatt-Brown and Anne Wyatt-Brown are both Members of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, and Members of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Bert kindly wrote (May 27, 2005): My wife and I are both looking forward to coming 15-16 December. Anne Wyatt-Brown is a specialist on the Holocaust and also on aging studies and is now the editor of a new publication in that field. 
Please see here Honor, Shame, and Iraq in American Foreign Policy, note prepared by Bert for our 2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict. Please see also Bert's abstract The Psychology of Humiliation: Mann’s “Mario and the Magician” and Hawthorne’s “Major Molineux, My Kinsman”, presented at the 23rd International Literature and Psychology Conference 2006, by the Institute for Psychological Study of the Arts (IPSA), University of Florida and the Department of Education, University of Helsinki, and our 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict.
Anne M. Wyatt-Brown kindly wrote (2 November, 2005): Dear Evelin, [...] I plan to talk about the book you mentioned in connection with your parents, A woman in Berlin.  I think it raises issues that need to be addressed about the relativity of humiliation experiences.  Moreover, I wonder if the behavior of her fianc is entirely caused by the loss of honor or fear of her resourcefulness.  Kenneth Kenniston talked about the difficulty American couples had post WWII when husbands returned to households which their wives had run successfully during the war.  These are issues that can be talked about and have application to other situations. Best, Anne.
Please see Anne's abstract presented at Round Table 2 of our 2005 workshop: A Woman in Berlin: The Complexity of Humiliation at the End of World War II. Please see also her abstract presented at our 2006 Workshop: Humiliation In My Brother’s Image.

•  Sara Cobb, Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution at GMU, Washington, USA. Sara Cobb is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Please see here "Humiliation" as Positions in Narratives: Implications for Policy Development, paper presented at our 2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, November 18-19, 2004. [back to the program]
• Manal Radwan, Saudi Embassy, will accompany Sara. She wants to conduct her dissertation on humiliation.

•  Carlos E. Sluzki, Professor at the College of Health and Human Services and at the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, George Mason University, and Clinical Professor at the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, George Washington University Medical School. Carlos E. Sluzki is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Please see here Elements of Humiliation-Shame Dynamics for Computational Modeling and Analysis of Real-Life Scenarios, draft of presentation at the 2004 Workshop on Humilliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, November 18-19, 2004.
Please see also:
The Story of the Crying Composer
, told at our 2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, NY, 2004,
and:
Humiliation Therapeutics (powerpoint presentation), developed at our 2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, NY, 2004.

•  Howard Zehr, Eastern Mennonite University, Virginia, USA. Howard Zehr is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Please see here Humiliation, Crime and Justice, note presented at Round Table 3 of our 2005 Workshop.

•  Monty G. Marshall, PhD, Director, Polity IV and Armed Conflict and Intervention Projects, Research Director, Center for Global Policy, Research Professor, School of Public Policy, George Mason University, USA.

•  Manas M. Ghanem, Eastern Mennonite University, Virginia, USA. Manas is a Member of the HumanDHS Research Team. Manas M. Ghanem is a researcher in our upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. The title of her HumanDHS research project is Iraqi Refugees in Syria and Jordan & Humiliation.

•  Moira Rogers, Eastern Mennonite University, EMU, Virginia, USA. Moira Rogers is a Member of the HumanDHS Research Team. Moira is both an Academic Advisor for our upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project, and has her own project, entitled Humiliation and Human Strength: Stories of African-Spanish Migrations.

•  Rina Kashyap, Chairperson, Department of Journalism, LSR, Delhi University/
Fulbright Scholar, Center for Justice and Peacebuilding, EMU, Virginia. Rina is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team.
Please see Rina's abstract of a paper presented at Round Table 3 of our 2005 Workshop: The Subversion of the Colonial System of Humiliation: A case study of the Gandhian Strategy.

•  James E. Jones, Manhattanville College, CUNY, USA. James Jones is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Please see:
- The Third Force: A Practical, Community-Building: Approach to Settling Destructive Conflicts, note presented at the 2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, November 18-19, 2004.
- The Post Victim Ethical Exemption Syndrome: An Outgrowth of Humiliation, note presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

•  Gay Rosenblum-Kumar, Public Administration Officer in the Governance and Public Administration Branch, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, New York, USA. Gay Rosenblum-Kumar is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Please see here:
- Humiliation, Conflict and Public Policy, note presented at our 2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, November 18-19, 2004. See also
- Horizontal Inequality and Humiliation: Public Policy for Disaffection or Cohesion?, note presented at Round Table 3 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

•  Patricia O'Hagan, Consultant to DESA, UN, Executive Director - CPDES. Patricia O'Hagan is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Please see here Humiliation and Resiliency in the Social Integration Process: Towards a model framework and policy dialogue at the United Nations, note presented at the 2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Day 2, Roundtable: "Can the notion of humiliation be useful for public policy planning?", Columbia University, New York, November 18-19, 2004.

•  Maggie O'Neill, Loughborough University, UK. Maggie O'Neill is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board. Maggie is an Academic Advisor to our upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project.
Please see:
- Re-Imagining Diaspora through Ethno-Mimesis: Humiliation, Human Dignity and Belonging (2006). Forthcoming in: Reimagining Diasporas: Transnational Lives and the Media, edited by O. Guedes-Bailey (Liverpool John-Moores University) M. Georgiou (University of Leeds) and R. Harindranath (University of Melbourne). Published by Palgrave Publishers, UK
- Humiliation, Social Justice and Ethno-mimesis, note presented at the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, 6th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in New York, December 15-16, 2005;
- Forced Migration, Humiliation and Human Dignity: Re-Imagining the Asylum-Migration Nexus through Participatory Action Research (PAR), abstract presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, 8th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in New York, December 14-15, 2006.

•  Floyd Webster Rudmin, University of Tromsø, Norway. Floyd Rudmin is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and Global Core Team.
Floyd kindly wrote (May 30, 2005): It will be a pleasure for me to participate.
Floyd kindly works on three projects:
- World Gender Relations for Equal Dignity
- World Apology for Equal Dignity
and
- Stop Hazing and Bullying.
Please see also:
- the abstract that Floyd presented at our 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Six Research Designs on Humiliation.
- the abstract presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Preventing Inadvertent Humiliation.

•  Grace Feuerverger, University of Toronto, Canada. Grace Feuerverger is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board. Please see The "School For Peace": A Conflict Resolution Program in a Jewish-Palestinian Village, paper presented at the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

•  Sharon Burde, creating and implementing international projects in conflict resolution (in Israel, Neve Shalom/Wahat Al-Salam, Kosovo), teaching at several universities, New York.
Sharon kindly wrote (August 25, 2006): Dear Evelin and Linda, I plan to attend the meeting in NYC Dec. 14-15 and would like to moderate a Roundtable. Since I just started reading your book, I've been thinking of you especially at this moment in time. Sharon.

•  Myra Mendible, PhD, American Studies
Please see Mediated Humiliations: Spectacles of Power in Postmodern Cultur, abstract presented at the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

•  Patricia Rodriguez Mosquera, Ph.D., Researcher, Brunel University, UK. Patricia Rodriguez Mosquera is a Member of the HumanDHS Core Team and Research Team.
Please see Humiliation and Honor, Patricia's note for the Round Table 1 of the 2005 workshop.

•  Annette A. Engler, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA. Annette Engler is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team and Education Team.
Please see the note Annette presented at our 2005 workshop: Displaced Identity and Humiliation in Children of Vietnam Veterans. Please see also the Special Symposium Issue that Annette is preparing together with D. Raja Ganesan.

•  Neil Altman, New York University, NY, USA. Neil Altman is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team.
Please see his paper for our 2004 workshop Humiliation, Retaliation, and Violence, in Tikkun Magazine, January/February 2004. Neil can be with us only on Friday.

•  Miriam Marton, Lawyer, New York, (formerly Detroit), USA. Miriam Marton is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team and the Research Team. She is part of the upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. The title of her HumanDHS research project is The Dual Humiliation of Female Refugees by Sexually Violent, Gender-based Acts.

•  Virginia Swain, Center for Global Community and World Law, Worcester, MA, USA, and Director of The Institute for Global Leadership. Virginia Swain is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board. Pleaase see A Proposed Global Mediation and Reconciliation Service (2005), paper originally presented at the 1999 Hague Appeal for Peace on the Panel, Building an Effective World Security System to Enhance the Capacity of the United Nations to Prevent and Resolve Armed Conflict. The Panel was in the Transforming Violent Conflict Strand of the Netherlands conference 100 years after governments met for the same purpose. Please see:
- Virginia Swain and Sarah Sayeed (2005), Reconciliation as Policy: Moving Beyond the Victim-Perpetrator Lens in the United Nations Secretariat and Member States, draft for a chapter for Victoria Fontan's planned book on Humiliation, presented at Round Table 3 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.
- Virginia Swain and Sarah Sayeed (2005/6), Reconciliation as Policy: A Capacity-Building Proposal for Renewing Leadership and Development, update of the draft for a chapter for Victoria Fontan's planned book on Humiliation, presented at Round Table 3 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.
- Virginia Swain and Sarah Sayeed (2006), A Leadership and Practice to Reconcile Challenges in a Post-September 11th World, draft for a paper for the Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

•  Sarah Sayeed, Ph.D., Women in Islam, Inc. and The Institute for Global Leadership.

•  Jean Berchmans Ndayizigiye, Eastern Mennonite University, Harrisonburg, Virginia, USA. Jean Berchmans Ndayizigiye is a Member of the HumanDHS Research Team. He is a researcher in our upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. The title of his project is Refugees from the Great Lakes Region of Central Africa & Humiliation.
Jean B. Ndayizigiye kindly wrote (June 8, 2005): I plan to attend the December workshop on Humiliation and violent conflict at Columbia University in New York. All the round tables seem very interesting, I will participate in the RT#2. Avec mon meilleur souvenir, enjoy your Summer. Thanks, Jean B. Ndayizigiye.
Please see his paper written for Round Table 1 of our workshop Humiliation and Violent Conflicts in Burundi.

•  Robert Kolodny, Robert Kolodny & Associates, independent organization development consultant based in NYC.
Robert Kolodny kindly wrote (November 10, 2005):
I am a friend and colleague of Don Klein, who alerted me to the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies group and the December workshop. In addition to my consulting practice, I also teach in a number of professional institutes in the US and abroad and have been on the faculty at Columbia and the New School. My interest in the conference follows from work I have been doing over the past several years on the impact of shame in organizational life. There has been a rediscovery of shame as a primary regulator of the social field among psychotherapists and theorists on human behavior at the individual and family levels. However, there is precious little theory or even awareness of its potent role in groups and organizations. Indeed, the absence itself, I think, tells us something about the invisibility and "shamefulness" of shame in most of Western culture. I am doing this work with a colleague, Cathe Carlson. In June of this year we co-chaired a conference on "Shame and Power in Organizational Life" at the Gestalt International Study Center on Cape Cod. We are preparing an article for publication in 2006.
Robert Kolodny kindly wrote (September 10, 2006):
I would like to be part of a roundtable to talk about "A Gestalt Perspective on Shame and Humiliation." Most of my experience is in workplaces and organizational settings (also conflict resolution in inter-organizational settings) and so does not involve Violent Conflict, which I understand is your focus. At the same time, I have a sense that the perspective I bring would be additive to your deliberations. I did not see the way I understand the human dynamics of shame and humiliation (and the pervasiveness of their influence) reflected in the presentations at last year's conference, although it is certainly consistent with many of the approaches I heard others describe.
Please see A Gestalt Perspective on Shame and Humiliation, summary of presentation to be made at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University.

•  Ben Alexander, Senior Partner, Alexander Consulting & Training, Inc., Norfolk, VA, Helping organizations meet the challenge of change.
Ben Alexander kindly wrote (on December 4, 2006): In the twenty-four years that I have been working as a consultant and trainer in the area of human resources management I have worked with a wide range of private, government and military organizations on issues of leadership, team building, conflict resolution and creating healthy workplaces free of discrimination, harassment and other forms of disrespectful behavior. In doing this work I have had many experiences with the dynamics of shame and humiliation as they relate to various conflicts within organizational settings. Based upon my experience with the Gestalt Systems and Levels Model, I have often been able to see the critical relationship between the anger acted out by employees who have experienced the humiliation of helplessness that results from working in oppressive systems and the shame-based arrogance of the managers and supervisors who are not able to face the truth of the disrespect that reveals what is really valued in their organizations. The result is a powerful cycle of anger, fear, recrimination, shame and guilty that impairs learning, performance and openness to change. Finding safe ways to get the "truth" on the table so that it can be used constructively to break this cycle has been one of my most difficult challenges.
It is for this reason that I am looking forward to attending the workshop. I feel that hearing these issues discussed will be helpful to me in moving along in my work. To the extent that the discussions in which I may become involved will offer opportunity for me to participate, I hope that I will be able to make a contribution from my experience. Sincerely, Ben.

•  Philip Brown, Director of the New JerseyCenter for Character Education in
Piscataway, NJ, USA. Please see his paper for our 2004 workshop Humiliation, Bullying and Caring in School Communities.

•  Ana Ljubinkovic, University of Essex, UK. Ana Ljubinkovic is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Board, and Research Team. Please see also From Violent to Subtle Humiliation: Case of Somali Victims of UNOSOM Living in the Refugee Camps in Kenya, note presented at Round Table 1 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005. See furthermore Is Hope the Last to Die? Research Study On The Situational Analysis In The Dadaab Refugee Camps, 2005, and Report on Field Research Conducted in Dadaab Refugee Camps (16.05.05 - 01.06.05), 2005.

•  Ana Prieto has a degree in Social Communication and is currently specializing in Education and Media Language at the Universidad Nacional de San Martín. She is currently a guest at the International Center for Tolerance Education, an initiative of the Third Millennium Foundation, New York.

•  Kathleen Freis, Education Director, International Center for Tolerance Education, an initiative of the Third Millennium Foundation, Brooklyn, New York, USA.

•  Jinan Nakshabandi graduated from the Technology University in the capital of Baghdad in 1987. She is currently a guest at the International Center for Tolerance Education, an initiative of the Third Millennium Foundation, New York. Jinan stood out as an exceptional woman leader with grand vision for womens empowerment within Jordan and, hopefully, in the future, Iraq.  Please see a bit about Jinan and her organization here, written by a Fulbright student in Jordan. She is also on our website (please scroll down to her name).

•  Thomas Scheff, Professor Emeritus at the Department of Sociology, UCSB, Santa Barbara, CA, and a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Tom kindly wrote (August 25, 2006): Evelin and Linda, Good work! Can't make it to NY, but you have my support and best wishes. Tom.
Tom kindly particpates in our workshop with two papers:
- Hypermasculinity and Violence as a Social System
- Silence and Mobilization: Emotional/relational Dynamics.

•  Michael Kimmel, Professor of Sociology at State University of New York, Stony Brook, and a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.

•  Ada Aharoni, writer, poet, playwright and lecturer, was born in Cairo, Egypt, and now lives in Haifa, Israel. She has published 25 books to date, that have won her international acclaim, and a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Ada kindly wrote (August 25, 2006): Dear Evelin, Best success! I wish I could be with you. With love, Ada.

•  Lene Lafosse, working on her thesis for the Cand. Polit. degree at the Institute of Social Anthropology at the University of Oslo, Norway, and a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team.
Lene kindly wrote (August 25, 2006): hi Evelin and Linda! thank you so much for the invitation! my activity level this fall-winter is already too high, so i will not be able to come to NY. although i haven't taken an active part yet, the Human dhs group often comes to my mind; i find the perspective of humiliation interesting and it adds a very important dimension to the issues we have as a common interest. i feel i will come forward stronger in the Human dhs network at a later point. i wish you good luck in NY! Best regards, Lene Lafosse.

•  Dennis Rivers, writer/teacher/peace activist who lives in Santa Barbara, teaches communication skills at the Santa Barbara Community Counseling & Education Center, directs the activities of the Institute for Cooperative Communication Skills, and edits several large peace and ecology web sites, and a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board. Due to illness, Dennis had to cancel joining our 2006 workshop in the last minute.
Dennis kindly wrote (August 25, 2006): Dear Evelin, I wish you all the best in your winter gathering. I am enclosing a link to an inspiring article about appreciative inquiry that I feature on the front page of my communication web site. I feel certain that this article has implications for our work. It would cetainly be an interesting study to go into an environment characterised by humiliation and find the few exceptional instances of dignity-granting. According to the article, those "positive deviants" would show the way that dignity-granting might be expanded in that particular environment. Hope you like the article. Many blessings, Dennis.
He kindly adds (August 26, 2006): Dear Evelin, I am delighted that you like the article about the Sternin's and would like to use it as a point of discussion in Costa Rica. What I like so much about the article is that the shift of perspective from problem-oriented to solution-oriented approaches is blazingly clear. It reminds me of the way that the historian of science, Thomas Kuhn, used the Copernican Revolution as an example of a scientific breakthrough that came not from new data but from a new way of putting the old data together. Kuhn's example was so vivid that it was, for me, unforgettable. We need those vivid examples to help us make big Gestalt shifts. I also want to say that I am not advocating appreciative inquiry as a new dogma, as easily happens in the USA with ideas about "positive thinking," especially not now when the USA is torturing and bombing people around the world. So, I want us to be able to talk about problems, but also shift to other perspectives, so that we do not become trapped in the perspectives that underlie our "problem talk." Many blessings, Dennis.
At 12:23 06/10/2006, Dennis Rivers wrote: Dennis kindly wrote (October 6, 2006)
Dear Evelin, [...] I am interested in your response to my "seeds, not diamonds" analogy, in the first paragraph of my statement, which is my way of trying to articulate a social-constructionist point of view in everyday language. I am somewhat tormented by the fact that I cannot make sense any more of concepts such as "inherent" worth, dignity or value.  I see human dignity as a glorious achievement, wherever it is bestowed by one person on another, and an inspiring possibility, worthy of our utmost devotion. But when people use the word "inherent" I am troubled and confused because human dignity has been violated so often, and so horrifically. I will certainly not argue with anybody about using the word "inherent." I just mentally translate it into "glorious achievement and inspiring possibility." Other comments to follow. Many blessings, Dennis
Linda Hartling responded (October 11, 2006):
For me, rather than thinking of human dignity as an individual, internal phenomena, I like to think of human dignity as a co-created experience. It is a experience developed through respectful connection (interpersonal, social, international, etc.) in which people feel known and valued, they feel that they matter....It is our responsibility to participate in the construction of this relational experience for all people. Many hugs! Linda
Please see also Citizens' Coalition to Reaffirm and Extend the Geneva Conventions - Initial Call
by Denis Rivers, dedicated to three of his teachers, Joanna Macy, the late Prof. Walter Capps and the Quaker peace activist, Gene Knudsen Hoffman.

•  Alyi Patrick Lalur (Uganda/UK), currently enrolled for the Masters of Philosophy in International Peace Studies at the United Nations-mandated University for Peace with research interest in Justice and Reconciliation during period of war, and a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team. Alyi Patrick Lalur is Director and Coordinator of HumanDHS's Child Soldiers Worldwide Project.
Patrick kindly wrote (August 26, 2006): Dear Evelin, Thank you for this mail and that of yesterday inviting me to the December NY confrence. This is a great opportunity for me and the rest of the team. Let me therefore confirm my attendance by copy of this mail. I will be sending you abstract of my work soon. I will also get back to you regularly in the course of time. Thanks, Patrick.

•  Clark McCauley, Professor of Psychology at Bryn Mawr College, a Director of the Solomon Asch Center for Study of Ethnopolitical Conflict at the University of Pennsylvania, and co-director of the National Consortium for Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (NC-START), and a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board. Author of Why Not Kill Them All? The Logic and Prevention of Mass Political Murder (Princeton University Press, 2006, together with Daniel Chirot)
Please see Understanding Humiliation As Suppressed Anger, abstract presented at Round Table 1 of our 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

•  Kathleen Modrowski, Professor and Director of the Friends World Program at Long Island University, Southampton Campus, New York, and a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Kathleen kindly wrote (August 28, 2006): Dear Evelin, So good to hear from you. I am very excited to attend the meeting. I would like to participate in the Roundtable on Humiliation being relevant to destructive conflict. I think I will be a supporter. I spent time in Bosnia this summer and have had a very strong experience in this area. I would like to work it into a case study but I am not sure that I have enough substantive information just yet. The area of the legagy of humiliation in a post convflict situation is very important and I would like to conntinue to work on this. I feel that the "tools" of human rights learning and education are not adequate and need to expand my resources. Much love. Kathleen.

•  Florina Benoit is completing her Ph.D. in Social Work on the quality of life of Sri Lankan Tamil refugees living in camps in Tamil Nadu. She is a Member of the HumanDHS Research Team.
•  Rev. Gladston Xavier, PhD., Former Principal, Loyola College, Chennai, India. He is a Member of the HumanDHS Research Team.
Florina kindly wrote (August 29, 2006): Dear Evelin, We (Ashok my husband and myself) would like to attend the meeting on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, kindly let me know what we should do. We would like to make a presentation on the types of social change efforts that show promise in reducing violent conflict and humiliation while upholding the dignity of all people based on our experience in working with the Sri Lankan refugees.
The refugees from Sri Lanka have begun pouring in once more. It is disheartening to hear their stories. I hope this will be a good time to share our experiences with them.
Looking forward to hearing from you. Peace, Florina.

•  Øystein Gullvåg Holter, Senior Researcher at the Work Research Institute in Oslo, Norway, and a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Øystein kindly write (August 31, 2006): Kjære Evelin, Jeg vil undersøke på NIKK om det er mulig å få støtte. Hadde vært fint å være med! Hilsen Øystein.

•  Arie Nadler, Professor of Social Psychology, Dean, Tel Aviv University, Israel. Arie Nadler is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and Research Team. He is an Academic Advisor for our Terrorism and Humiliation Project.
see his paper from our 2004 NY meeting: How Dynamics of Humiliation Can Be Overcome by Apology. See also his talk Assistance in Intercultural Settings and its Links with Dignity and Humiliation at the Public Event of our 2005 Berlin meeting.
Arie kindly proposes as one of the Round Table topics "Justice and Humiliation." He wrote (April 28, 2005): Dear Evelin, another topic that may be of interest is: "Justice and Humiliation." I refer to the ways in which different principles of justice (mainly retributive vs. restorative justice) are driven by the desire to impose/avoid humiliation on the wrongdoer. I am currently reading some stuff on retributive and restorative justice systems and find myself fascinated by the potential integrative power of the concept of humiliation in such discussions.

•  Barry Hart, Ph.D., Center for Justice and Peacebuilding, Eastern Mennonite University.

•  Nick Martin, currently a visiting fellow at the United Nations University for Peace (UPEACE) campus in Costa Rica. Nick Martin is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team.
Nick kindly wrote (September 9, 2006): I would love to join you all in new york in December if its possible.

•  Victor Adangba, (USA/Ivory Coast) is a Doctoral Student in Moral Theology and Ethics at the Jesuit School of Theology at Berkeley, USA. Victor Boudjou Adangba is a Member of the HumanDHS Research Team. He is a researcher in our upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. The title of his project is Immigrants, Refugees in West Africa and Humiliation.
Victor kindly wrote (September 18, 2006): Dear Evelin, I would like to attend the forthcoming meeting in NY, December 14-15, 2006. I would like to look at tribal name calling in Africa and its potential for humiliation and tribal clashes. This is still a project. Please let me know if there is an opening for this conference. Victor.

•  Nora Femenia, Ph.D., Associate Faculty, Florida International University, Miami, FL, U.S.A. Please see Emotional Actor: Foreign Policy Decision-Making in the 1982 Falklands/Malvinas War, in Patrick G. Coy, and Lynne M. Woehrle (Eds.), Social Conflicts and Collective Identities. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2000.
Nora kindly wrote (September 9, 2006): Dear Linda, Evelin. Many thanks for this answer, I feel that I've found finally a niche where my two fields (CR and Psychology) can coexist and produce...this connection was sorely missing when I got to Syracuse U., in 1989. Nora.

•  Merle Lefkoff, President, Ars Publica, Santa Fe, NM, USA
Merle kindly wrote (June 22, 2005): Thank you so much for the invitation to attend the meeting in December! Please see the note that Merle presented at our 2005 workshop: When the Butterfly Flaps Her Wings in Gaza.

•  Dana L. Comstock, Ph.D., St. Mary’s University, Department of Counseling and Human Services, One Camino Santa Maria, San Antonio, Texas, USA.

•  Jasmine M. Waddell, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College, Boston, USA. Please see the abstract Jasmine has presented at the 2006 workshop: Ubuntu, Dignity and Humiliation.

•  Roberta Kosberg, Professor, Curry College, USA. Roberta Kosberg is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team.

•  Brian Lynch, M.D., Chicago, USA
Brian Lynch wrote (September 26, 2006): I just finished reading "Humiliation in a Globalizing World: Does Humiliation Become the Most Disruptive Fore?" My answer is yes. I would just like to wish you all well and support and introduce myself and maybe join with you in some small way. I am a physician who came across Silvan S. Tomkins' work through knowing Donald Nathanson, both of which Dr. Lindner referenced. Since then I can say 100 per cent of my efforts have revolved around promoting his ideas. I have reached out as possible through the Internet and with what little contacts I have.
For years I thought that Thomas Friedman has certainly been interesting in his repetition that "humiliation is the greatest single problem in the Middle East" and it is one of the best if not the best examples of how some of the best and crucial information languishes in our midst even while being articulated that there is.
Other than that I try daily to refine a true mind-body medicine made real through Tomkins' idea of biological affect.
My efforts to promote these ideas to the public can be see through what I have done on the web all of which can be reached through: BRIANLYNCHMD
But I would like to draw you attention to some specific sites:
TWELVE STEPS TO JUSTICE
SOME THINGS TOMKINS
TWELVE STEPS TO EMOTIONAL HEALTH
Thank you for any time and or attention you my give this it looks like we are all trying to get to the same place.
Please see Silvan Tomkins' Conceptualization of Humiliation, abstract presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict.
Please see also Notes on a Conference, notes that he prepared after our 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict.

•  Charles Knight, co-director of the Project on Defense Alternatives at the Commonwealth Institute
Charles Knight is co-director of the Project on Defense Alternatives at the Commonwealth Institute, which he helped found in 1987 and where he serves as President. In 1989, he founded the Ground Force Alternatives Project at the Institute for Defense and Disarmament Studies, where he was a Research Fellow. The Ground Force Alternatives Project later became the Project on Defense Alternatives. He is also the director of the Progressive Strategies Studies Project. He has authored and co-authored numerous publications and made presentations on peace and security issues at governmental and non-governmental institutions. In the mid 1990s, he served as a consultant to the post-apartheid South African government on stability-oriented security options for southern Africa. Since 2004 he has been studying how conventional male gender identities function in conditions of patriarchy to support the formation of war parties in the politics of national security. Within this he is looking at the potential for change arising from the liberation of other male gender identities.
Charles wrote (October 17, 2006): Dear Evelin: [...] here is what I would like to contribute: very brief remarks in the form of a few propositions regarding the role of humiliation in enforcing conventional masculinity learning and behavior and the potential of a certain type of “men’s movement” for liberating (some portion of) men from the humiliation/violence complex and therefore contributing to a broader movement for positive social change.

•  Judit Révész, Lawyer, Researcher, NY Director of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team, and Global HumanDHS Staff. Since 2001, Judit supports our work untiringly, every day, actively.

•  Christopher Santee, University for Peace in Costa Rica.

•  Eric C. Marcus, Ph.D., Prinicipal of The Marcus Group, Maximizing Organization, Team & Individual Development, NY, USA.

•  Tony Castleman, Food and Nutrition Senior Program Officer, FANTA (Food and Nutrition Technical Assistance) Project, Academy for Educational Development, Washington DC, USA, and Ph.D. student at George Washington University in development economics with a dissertation topic that is related to humiliation and human dignity. Unfortunately, Tony had to cancel in the last minute.
Please see The Role of Human Recognition in Economic Development: Theory, Measurement, and Evidence, extended abstract presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

•  Jacque Steubbel, journalist, working on a theological advanced degree at the University of the South, Sewanee, planning to move on to a PhD in Middle Eastern history.

•  Michael L. Perlin, Professor, Director, International Mental Disability Law Reform Project
Director, Online Mental Disability Law Program, New York Law School, New York, NY.
Please see "Friend to the Martyr, a Friend to the Woman of Shame": Thinking About The Law and Humiliation, the resentation that Michael presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University.

Sibyl Ann Schwarzenbach, Associate Professor of Philosophy at The City University of New York (Baruch College and the Graduate Center).

•  Noel Mordana, New York USA. Noel participated in ORLJ 4859, Conflict Resolution & the Psychology of Humiliation Fall 2004, Nov 12-14, with Evelin Lindner.

•  Melissa Gage, New York US, bilingual high-school junior dedicated to peace. Please see Different Types of Humiliation Elicit Different Emotional, Cognitive And Behavioral Reactions, the note Melissa presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict.

•  Judith Thompson, Frontiers of Social Healing Dialogue, USA. Judith is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Judith Thompson kindly wrote (13th June, 2005): Dear Evelin: Don Klein suggested that I contact you about the conference in Berlin in September. I have recently completed my doctoral dissertation on on the question of how compassion arises in the process of social healing. Don was my reader. I was very pleased that he thought the dissertation was "exemplary" (to use his words) and that it he thought I could both gain from and contribute to the conference.
In my work I had a section on humiliation, noting that the recent interest in understanding humiliation (begun by Don and carried on so brilliantly by you!) is one of the moves toward the relational roots of conflict which constitute what I call the social healing paradigm (which stresses the holistic and systems aspects of peacebuilding work). My interest in compassion been the product of my decades of work in the field ­ mostly in peace education, cultural/community organizing, and international dialogue, and running an international non-profit for over a decade. The themes of enlarging one’s self concept and self-experience through the connection to other’s suffering has been central to that work (as well as personally enlightening and enriching). I will be sharing some of my research at a conference in Sarajevo this summer on Global Human Rights, together with Ken Suslak, who I believe has also been in contact with you. I would love to both share my own work and learn from others in Berlin, and hope to hear more from you about how that might occur. A little bit of information on what I’ve been doing can be found here: http://69.36.178.127/resources/thompson/thompson.html and
http://69.36.178.127/resources/restore_justice/carsarjianthompson.html
I look forward to hearing from you. And, thank you for the wonderful work you have been doing! Judith Thompson.

•  Anie Kalayjian, American Board Certified Expert in Traumatic Stress, logotherapeutic psychotherapist, researcher, and consultant, USA. Please meet Anie at http://www.meaningfulworld.com/bio.html. Anie is a Member of our HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Anie kindly wrote (July 13, 2005): Dear Evelin: This is a wonderful conference, and I am looking forward to do a forgiveness workshop or a panel. Kindly let me know what you need from us. I am attaching a one page short resume for your information. Much gratitude, Anie. Please see  Turkish Denial of the Genocide of Armenians, Greeks, Assyrians: Transforming Humiliation into Understanding and Forgiveness, abstract written for the Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, November 15-16, 2005. See also Israeli & Hezbollah Conflict: International Perspectives on the Future of Peace in the Middle East, a paper that Anie Kalayjian co-authored with Luke Anable in August 2006: During a layover in Frankfurt, Germany, Anie Kalayjian interviewed randomly selected individuals in an attempt to gauge the public’s emotional and psychological response to the Israeli & Hezbollah war.

•  Michael Britton, Ed.D., Psychologist, NJ, USA. Co-founder of the New Jersey Psychologists for Social Responsibility, and Associate Fellow of Rutgers University 's Center for Historical Analysis, and the Project on War, Peace and Society in Cultural and Historical Perspective.

•  Rosita Albert, Visiting Scholar, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, and Department of Communication Studies, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. Her sponsor at Harvard is Prof. Herbert Kelman.
Rosita kindly wrote (November 20, 2006): "I am a Visiting Scholar in Social Psychology area of the Psychology Dept at Harvard, and my research focuses on Intercultural Relations and Intercultural Conflicts. I am also an Associate Professor in the pioneering program in Intercultural Communication in Department of Communication Studies at the University of Minnesota. I am a Founding Fellow and a member of the Governing Board of the International Academy for Intercultural Research. I am originally from Brazil, and my mother and grandparents left Germany to escape from Hitler. It is because of this background that I work to create respectful relations among groups from different backgrounds."
Languages and international/intercultural experience:
Rosita speaks Portuguese, French, Spanish and English, and has had extensive experience with cultures from many parts of the world.
Education and Positions:
Ph.D. in Social Psychology from the University of Michigan. She has taught in Psychology, Education and Communication at a number of Universities.
Research:
Rosita has conducted research in a variety of topics, including research on a) the development and evaluation of the Intercultural Sensitizer, an instrument designed to foster intercultural sensitization; b) interactions between Latin Americans/Latinos and North or Anglo-Americans; c) the experiences and difficulties of Asian employees in American companies; d) conflicts and mutual misperceptions between African-Americans and Koreans in the U.S.; e) cultural differences in perceptions of negotiation; f) the effect of intercultural courses on intercultural development; and f) the effect of online interactions on perceptions of the other.
Teaching, training and consulting:
Rosita has taught courses in social psychology, intercultural communication, negotiation, and diversity. These courses have included students from many fields, countries all over the world, and a very wide range of cultures. She has conducted intercultural and diversity training, given presentations, and consulted for a number of organizations, including the World Bank, the 3-M company, Booz Allen Hamilton, the National Association of Transplant Coordinators, the University of São Paulo, the University of Minnesota and a number of other institutions.
Please see the abstract that Rosita presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Violent Interethnic Conflict and Human Dignity: Major Issues in Intercultural Research and Knowledge Utilization.

•  Jessica Cichalski, Master of Public Policy and Administration, NJ, she conducted research for comparative projects on immigration, welfare state and family policies for publication.

•  Julie Strentzsch, M. A.  in Community Counseling, an LPC and is currently a doctoral student at St. Mary's University in San Antonio, TX, USA.

•  Rebecca Subar, working with a conflict management group in Cambridge, USA, CMPublic, currently training Palestinian political leaders among other projects. Please see her contribution to our 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University: Supporting People As They Challenge Their Own Narratives: The Necessity of, and Trouble With, Challenging Beliefs Fundamental to One's Identity, Dignity and Sense of Belonging. [back to the program]

•  Doris Brosnan, Columbia University, New York, USA.

•  Allison Nicole Buehler, Columbia University, New York, USA.
Allison recently worked with disability rights organizations and the UN Ad Hoc Committee in efforts to draft a UN Disability Rights Convention. Currently preparing for an internship with the International Labor Organization's Skills and Employability Department, Allison will continue to be involved in disability rights and the development of strategies to bring about the realization f the principles established by the disability rights convention. Additionally, Allison hopes to identify and develop ways for mediation and leadership programs to increase the capacity for people with disabilities act as self advocates. This will contribute to the realization of equal enjoyment of rights and dignity for all people, including those with disabilities.

•  Olga Botcharova, international expert in conflict management and cross-cultural communications, Washington, DC, USA.

•  Nicholas B. Diehl, Associate Ombuds, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA.
Please see The Role of Dignity and Humiliation in the Organizational Context, his note presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University.

•  Alison Anthoine, Attorney at Law, New York, NY.
Alison Anthoine kindly wrote (December 3, 2006): I am an attorney/mediator in NYC with a particular interest in race and class issues. I am now developing a new project focusing on the dignity (and lack thereof) accorded patients in NYC hospitals, and would very much like to attend the closed sessions of your conference.Thanks in advance for your consideration, Alison Anthoine.
Alison Anthoine kindly wrote (December 12, 2006): I am currently developing a new social enterprise, HealthcareCommons.org, based on my observation that a largely overlooked aspect of the broken US healthcare system is the increasing lack of communication and trust between patients and professionals. By providing a non-commercial, consumer/patient-oriented online information service combined with a "social network with a purpose", HealthcareCommons.org will bridge the communication gap between patients and professionals, will help patients take control of their own health and health habits, and will contribute their voices to the improvement of healthcare quality and safety.
Please see The Role of Dignity and Humiliation in the Delivery of Healthcare Services, note presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University.

•  Pamela H. Creed, Ph.D. Candidate, Conflict Analysis and Resolution, George Mason University, Washington DC, USA. Please see The Dominant American Narrative between 9/11/01 and the Invasion of Iraq, an introduction to a potential dissertation, written for for our 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict. The dissertation aims to analyze the dominant American narrative between 9/11/01 and the invasion of Iraq through positioning theory and the literature on humiliation and conflict.

•  Stuart P.D. Gill, Ph.D., Columbia Science Fellow, Columbia University, USA.

•  Ariel Lublin, Mediation Coordinator for the Center for Court Innovation's Midtown Community Court in Manhattan, NY, USA.
Ariel Lublin has been the Mediation Coordinator for the Midtown Community Court (a restorative justice project of the Center for Court Innovation), where she directed a mediation program, led trainings in communication and conflict resolution for attorneys, school counselors, and others, and convened and facilitated dialogues for groups in conflict. These group discussions often included criminal defendants, homeless individuals, advocacy groups, nightclub and hotel owners and managers, police officers, public officials, non-profit service agencies, and neighborhood resident associations seeking shared solutions to common concerns.
As an assistant teacher at Harvard’s Center for Public Leadership, Ariel worked with students from over 30 countries, many involved directly in violent conflicts in their own countries. She advised and taught students in two classes - Exercising Leadership: Mobilizing Group Resources, and Managing Intractable Conflict: Leadership and Multiparty Dispute Resolution. She was also involved in the first two Women Waging Peace Conferences with the Women and Public Policy Program, assisting with a manual on best practices and presenting on Sudanese Women Peace Activists. And she authored an article on ethnic conflict in Kosovo.
A counselor for many years, she previously directed a psychiatric crisis intervention team for the state of Massachusetts.
Personally, Ariel, like many people, has also learned from experiences of conflict in her own life. By heritage half German gentile and half Russian Jew, as well as a child of divorced parents, she grew up appreciating how cultural and personal habits can be interpreted as "good" or "bad" depending which home or group you are with. In addition, she has experienced being physically assaulted by a partner, and has presented on alternative personal, social, and legal responses to violence.
In addition to conflict resolution work, Ariel also supports people in designing life-affirming ceremonies, including weddings and other celebrations.
Please see the note Ariel has presented at Round Table 3 of our workshop,
Addressing Humiliation through Listening with Respect: A Restorative Justice Model for Victims, Offenders, and Law Enforcement. Her contribution to our 2006 workshop is Fostering Connection and Positive Outcomes through Appreciation and Optimism.


 

Details of the Convening Organizations

The Center for International Conflict Resolution (CICR) is part of the Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN), as is the International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (ICCCR), and Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) that aims at contributing to the resolution of international deadly conflict through research, teaching and fieldwork.

CICR's location within the Institute of War and Peace Studies at Columbia University 's School of Public and International Affairs allows for research collaborations inside and outside of the university with academics and practitioners from governmental, non-governmental and international organizations. The CICR faculty advisory includes Professors Richard Betts, Page Fortna, Robert Jervis and Jack Snyder. Former U.S. Senator George Mitchell joined the Center as a Senior Fellow in July 2002.

The Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN) was founded in 1997 by a voluntary group of faculty members from throughout the University interested in conflict resolution. The result of their efforts was a broad-based multidisciplinary conflict resolution resource for the entire Columbia community to use to strengthen the research, teaching and training initiatives of its independent schools and departments.

The International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (ICCCR) was founded in 1986 by Morton Deutsch. It is at present headed by Peter Coleman, with Beth Fisher-Yoshida as Associate Director. ICCCR is an innovative Center dedicated to advancing the study and practice of conflict resolution. ICCCR's mission is an educational one: to help individuals, schools, communities, businesses and governments better understand the nature of conflict and develop the skills and settings that enable them to resolve conflict constructively.

Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) was founded by Evelin Lindner in 2002 as a partner institute of the Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network. HumanDHS's mission is to contribute to reducing - and ultimately eliminating - destructive disrespect and humiliation around the world. HumanDHS's efforts focus on generating research, disseminating information, applying creative educational methods, as well as devising pilot projects and policy strategies.


 

Papers

All participants are warmly invited to send in papers.
Please notify us, if you wish to submit any of your papers also as a book chapter or as a journal article in our Journal of HumanDignity and Humiliation Studies.

Please see earlier submitted papers here:
• List of All Publications
• Papers, Abstracts, and Notes for the 2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict
• Papers, Abstracts, and Notes for the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict

 

Abstracts/Notes/Papers of 2006

Please see further down the papers/notes that participants send in prior to the workshop so that everybody can get acquainted with all others beforehand. (Please see last year's papers and notes)

See here the work by:
Andrea Bartoli
Linda Hartling
Donald Klein

Victoria Firmo-Fontan

Evelin Lindner

Pamela Creed (2006)
The Dominant American Narrative between 9/11/01 and the Invasion of Iraq
Introduction to a potential dissertation, written for for the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006. The dissertation aims to analyze the dominant American narrative between 9/11/01 and the invasion of Iraq through positioning theory and the literature on humiliation and conflict.

Alison Anthoine (2006)
The Role of Dignity and Humiliation in the Delivery of Healthcare Services
Note presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

Nicholas Kappelhof (2006)
How Humiliation and Shame May Undermine Education Reform Efforts

Note presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

Virginia Swain and Sarah Sayeed (2005/6)
Reconciliation as Policy: A Capacity-Building Proposal for Renewing Leadership and Development.
Update of the draft for a chapter for Victoria Fontan's planned book on Humiliation, presented at Round Table 3 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 15-16, 2005.

Virginia Swain and Sarah Sayeed (2006)
A Leadership and Practice to Reconcile Challenges in a Post-September 11th World.
Draft for a paper for the Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

Robert Kolodny (2006)
A Gestalt Perspective on Shame and Humiliation
Summary of Presentation To Be Made at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

Michael Perlin (2006)
"Friend to the Martyr, a Friend to the Woman of Shame": Thinking About The Law and Humiliation
Presentation presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

Melissa Gage (2006)
Different Types of Humiliation Elicit Different Emotional, Cognitive And Behavioral Reactions
Note presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

Nicholas B. Diehl (2006)
The Role of Dignity and Humiliation in the Organizational Context
Note presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

Rosita Albert (2006)
Violent Interethnic Conflict and Human Dignity: Major Issues in Intercultural Research and Knowledge Utilization
Abstract presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

Tony Castleman (2006)
The Role of Human Recognition in Economic Development: Theory, Measurement, and Evidence
Extended abstract presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

James Edward Jones (2006)
The Post Victim Ethical Exemption Syndrome: An Outgrowth of Humiliation
Note presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

Maggie O'Neill (2006)
Forced Migration, Humiliation and Human Dignity: Re-Imagining the Asylum-Migration Nexus through Participatory Action Research (PAR)
Abstract presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, 8th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in New York, December 14-15, 2006.

Jasmine M. Waddell (2006)
Ubuntu, Dignity and Humiliation
Abstract presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

Brian Lynch (2006)
Silvan Tomkins' Conceptualization of Humiliation
Abstract presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

Judy Kuriansky (2006)
Transforming Conflict and Humiliation to Heal Hearts in the Holy Land: People-to-People Projects to Build Peace, Coexistence and Cooperation between Palestinians and Israelis
Abstract presented at Round Table 2 of the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

Jennifer S. Goldman (2006)
Humiliation and Aggression
Abstract presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

Dennis Rivers (2006)
Citizens' Coalition to Reaffirm and Extend the Geneva Conventions - Initial Call
(Dedicated to three of his teachers, Joanna Macy, the late Prof. Walter Capps and the Quaker peace activist, Gene Knudsen Hoffman)

Floyd Webster Rudmin (2006)
Preventing Inadvertent Humiliation
Abstract presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

Chrisopher Santee (2006)
American Diversity and the Role of Humiliation
Note presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

Clark McCauley (2006)
Understanding Humiliation As Suppressed Anger
Abstract presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

Anne Wyatt-Brown (2006)
Humiliation In My Brother’s Image
Abstract presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

Bertram Wyatt-Brown (2006)
The Psychology of Humiliation: Mann’s “Mario and the Magician” and Hawthorne’s “Major Molineux, My Kinsman”
Abstract presented at the 23rd International Literature and Psychology Conference 2006, by the Institute for Psychological Study of the Arts (IPSA), University of Florida and the Department of Education, University of Helsinki, and the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.


 

Final Papers of 2006

(Please see last year's papers)

Thomas Scheff (2006)
Hypermasculinity and Violence as a Social System
Paper contributed to the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

Thomas Scheff (2006)
Silence and Mobilization: Emotional/relational Dynamics
Paper contributed to the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 14-15, 2006.

Martin, Nicholas Carl (2006)
Exploring Possibilities for UPEACE in China: Peace Education, Project Development Report
Thesis submitted for the degree of Master of Arts, Peace Education.

Maggie O’Neill (2006) together with Ramaswami Harindranath
Theorising Narratives of Exile and Belonging: The Importance of Biography and Ethno-mimesis in “Understanding” Asylum
In Qualitative Sociology Review, II (1, April), pp. 39-52.

Arie Nadler (2006), together with Samer Halabi
Intergroup Helping as Status Relations: Effects of Status Stability, Identification, and Type of Help on Receptivity to High-Status Group’s Help
In Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2006, 91 (1), pp. 97–110.

Evelin Lindner (2004)
Humiliation in a Globalizing World: Does Humiliation Become the Most Disruptive Force? (2004)
See the same text here, as short summary, and longer paper (not to be cited without author's authorization).

 


 

Ideas for More Round Table Topics

Your input is very welcome!

Floyd Webster Rudmin:
"Asymmetries in self-perceptions of being the humiliatee versus the humiliator"
"Archetypal humiliation in literature: A survey of English literature teachers"

Annette Engler:
"Constructing Narratives after Violent Conflict"
Annette kindly wrote on March 31, 2006: "I would like to discuss how individuals construct their narratives after traumatic experiences or event."

Dharm P. S. Bhawuk:
"Theory, Method, and Practice of Humiliation Research"
This could also be a topic for our Open Space

Ana Ljubinkovic:
"Assistance and Humiliation"

Varda Mühlbauer:
"Humiliation/Dignity in the Workplace"
"Humiliation/Dignity in the Family"

Zahid Shahab Ahmed:
"Humiliation and Child Sexual Abuse"

Victoria C. Fontan:
"Terrorism and Humiliation" and
"Armed Conflict, Escalation and Humiliation"

Miriam Marton:
"Consequences of Humiliation"

Jörg Calliess:
"How to Prepare 'Non-Psychologists' (Human Rights Defenders, Peace Keepers, etc.) for Dealing with the Trauma of Humiliation in Victims"

Emmanuel Ndahimana:
"Ignorance and Humiliation"

Arie Nadler:
"Justice and Humiliation"

Alicia Cabezudo:
"Interlinking Peace Education and Humiliation Studies: A Bridge for Crossing Borders"