5th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies
in Berlin in 2005

"Beyond Humiliation:

Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People"

15th -17th September, 2005
14th -18th September with Pre- and Post-Progamme

Eric Van Grasdorff very kindly organised our meeting!
A big thank-you to you, dear Eric!



The dates of our meeting were 15th-17th September, however, Eric had already activities planned for the 14th, and then also for Sunday, 18th! So, many of us took some more days!

Please see:
•  Newsletter Nr. 4 (Summer 2005, Prior to our Berlin Conference)
•  the Conference Notes (thanks to Rebecca!)
•  Newsletter Nr. 5 (September 2005, subsequent to our Berlin Conference).

Please click here or in the middle of the picture to see all the pictures from Linda's camera.
(Important note to our conference particants: During our conference, we asked for your permission to be posted here, however, if you have changed your mind since, either in total or for specific pictures, please let us know! Thank you! Since we wish to walk the talk of dignity, it is very important for us to do our utmost in respecting everybody's privacy. We refrain from gathering written permissions from you during our conferences, since we value the building of mutual trust in relationships, and we also would like to refrain from contributing to an ever more bureaucratic and legalistic society.)

Please click here or in the middle of the picture to see all the pictures from Evelin's camera.

 

Our meeting had two parts:

•  Public Conference on "Humiliation in Intercultural Relations"
Saturday, 17th September 2005, 13.00 - 17.00
Heinrich Böll Foundation
Hackesche Höfe, Rosenthaler Str. 40/41, 10178 Berlin
Everybody is warmly invited!
detailed map | public transport (pdf) | Subway plan of Berlin | the closest station is "Hackescher Markt"

Workshop
15th -17th September, 2005
(14th -18th September with Pre- and Post-Progamme)
This part of the conference was closed to the public.
Meeting places:
• 15th & 16th September: Studienwerk der Heinrich Böll Stiftung, Eldenaer Strasse 35, 10347 Berlin | Subway plan of Berlin | the closest S-Bahn station is "Storkower Strasse," the closest U-Bahn station is "U Samariterstr" (this is for line U 5 direction "Hönow").
• 17th September, all day: Heinrich Böll Foundation, Hackesche Höfe, Rosenthaler Str. 40/41, 10178 Berlin | Subway plan of Berlin | the closest station is "Hackescher Markt"

•  Where to stay
The hotel that Eric and Vero found for us is called Sachsenhof. It is located in "Schöneberg," a very central part of town. The prices are 55€ per night for a single room including Shower/WC/Breakfast. Double room is 39,50€ per person per night. The hotel is in Motzstrasse 7 (10777 Berlin, Tel: +49 (0)30 216 20 74, Fax: +49 (0)30 215 82 20, E-Mail: info@hotel-sachsenhof-berlin.de).
The hotel is very close to the subway station called "Nollendorfplatz" that serves the subway lines U1, U2, U3, and U4. The bus station "Nollendorfplatz" serves bus lines M19 and 187. When you are at "Nollendorfplatz," you see Motzstraße. Walk for ca. 100 m and you see Hotel Sachsenhof!
From Airport "Tegel," take the bus X9 to the subway station "Jakob-Kaiser-Platz." From there take subway line U7 direction "Rudow." Exit at "Bismarckstraße" and switch to subway line U2 direction "Pankow." Exit at "Nollendorfplatz." There you are!
Subway plan of Berlin | Airport Tegel

•  What you could do in the evening! (e.g. on Day Two, 16th September)
We were in Berlin during a very busy period! Many cultural events took place and people usually get frustrated not to be able to benefit from them all… That’s often the feeling in Berlin!
•  POP_COM
•  International Literature Festival Berlin
•  16./17.09. House of the Cultures of the World – Korean Theater
•  Jazz: A-Trane
•  Quasimodo (very famous)
•  Schlot
•  Philharmonie

•  Please kindly note that...
• There is no registration fee for our conferences. To cover our expenses, we always summarise the costs during the conference and invite participants to contribute according to their ability. This collaborative approach to financing allows us to keep the conference affordable for all.
• We like to get to know participants prior to our conferences and workshops, and prior to issuing an invitation.
• All our gatherings are by invitation only, please approach us so that we can include you and register you. Only our Public Events are open to everybody without registration.
• The Non-Public Parts of our gatherings have limited enrollment.
• Participants are encouraged to find their own sources of funding or economic support to participate in our conferences. We offer our nurturing work as our gift of love and care to you, ad we would like to lovingly invite everybody to contribute to this gift economy. If you need funding for your travels and housing, please inquire in your country and your university about possibilities. See, among others, for the US, www.supportcenter.org and www.foundationscenter.org. The Weinstein International Fellowship program, inaugurated in 2008, provides opportunities for individuals from outside the United States to visit the U.S. to learn more about dispute resolution processes and practices and to pursue a project of their own design that serves to advance the resolution of disputes in their home countries.
• Participants in our conferences are kindly asked to handle all of their travel arrangements and required documentation, including requests for visas, on their side. HumanDHS is a volunteer initiative and does not have the staff or resources to assist with visa requests.

•  Permissions
During our conferences, we always ask all participants for their permission to have their pictures or videos posted on our website, however, if you change your mind later, either in total or for specific pictures/videos, please let us know! Thank you! Since we wish to walk the talk of dignity, it is very important for us to do our utmost in respecting everybody's privacy. We refrain from gathering written permissions from you during our conferences, since we value the building of mutual trust in relationships, and we also would like to refrain from contributing to an ever more bureaucratic and legalistic society.

•  What happened in our previous meetings?

Please read in here what happened at our 2004 meeting that we had in Paris. Please read also the newsletter 2 that was written after our 2004 Paris meeting, as well as the newsletter 3 that was written after our 2004 NY meeting and newsletter 4 written in summer 2005.

 


•  List of Conveners
•  How We Go About
•  Frame
•  Public Conference on "Humiliation in Intercultural Relations" on Day Three
•  Closed Meeting (Day Before & Day One & Day Two & Day Three & Day After)
•  Round Table 1: "Assistance and Humiliation," 14.00-16.30, Day One
•  Round Table 2: "Terrorism and Humiliation," 16.45-18.00, Day One
•  Round Table 3: "Peace Education and Humiliation," 9.30-10.30, Day Three
•  Round Table 4: "Humiliation/Dignity in the Family and Workplace," 11.00-12.00, Day Three
•  Open Space, Day Two
•  List of Participants

•  Papers
•  Pictures of our meeting from Evelin's camera
•  Pictures of our meeting from Linda's camera
•  Newsletter 5, written as report subsequent to our meeting
•  Conference Notes, taken by Becca and edited by Christine!

 




List of Conveners


Evelin Gerda Lindner, Medical Doctor, Clinical and Social Psychologist, Ph.D. (Dr. med.), Ph.D. (Dr. psychol.), Organiser of the HumanDHS Conferences, , Supporting the Local Conveners

Evelin G. Lindner is the Founding Director and President of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS). She is a transdisciplinary social scientist, affiliated with the Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network, New York, the University of Oslo, Norway, Department of Psychology (folk.uio.no/evelinl/), and the Maison des Sciences de l'Homme, Paris. Lindner is also an Associate Professor at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim, Department of Psychology, Norway, and teaches globally, including in South East Asia, the Middle East, Australia, Africa, and other places globally. [read more]

Linda Hartling, Ph.D., Social Psychologist, Organiser of the HumanDHS Conferences, Supporting the Local Conveners

Associate Director, Jean Baker Miller Training Institute, Wellesley College, Boston, USA. Linda Hartling is a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, Global Core Team, and Education Team.
Please see:
• Humiliation: Real Pain, A Pathway to Violence, the draft of Linda's paper for Round Table 2 of our 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York.
Humiliation: Assessing the Impact of Derision, Degradation, and Debasement, first published in The Journal of Primary Prevention, 19(4): 259-278, co-authored with T. Luchetta, 1999.
• Shame and Humiliation: From Isolation to Relational Transformation, the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMIT), Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College No. 88, Wellesley, MA 02481, co-authored with Wendy Rosen, Maureen Walker, Judith V. Jordan, 2000.
• Humiliation and Assistance: Telling the Truth About Power, Telling a New Story, paper prepared for the 5th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies 'Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People', in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.

Eric Van Grasdorff

Eric Van Grasdorff is a member of the Board of Directors of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, based in Berlin. He is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team. He has kindly built our website.

Véronique Lingfeld

Véronique Lingfeld is based in Berlin.

 


 

How We Go About

In our meetings, we wish to choose a dialogical methodology that stresses interaction and participation because we wish to create an atmosphere of openness and respectful inquiry through Round Tables and the use of Open Space Technology. We believe that notions such as dignity and respect for equal dignity are important not only for conflict resolution, but also for meetings such as this workshop. The name Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies attempts to express this. We wish to strive for consistency between what we think are important values for conflict resolution and the way we conduct our work and our meetings.

We liked the Round Table discussion format we used in our 2004 NY meeting. Everyone has 5-10 minutes to present their entry point into the discussion, then we have an open discussion. 10 participants seems to be the maximum number that makes the discussion interesting and not overloaded. We have 2 empty chairs in the circle that can be taken by participants from the audience who wish to introduce a question or comment.

We liked our previous experience with two moderators for each Round Table. In that way, the moderators are not prevented from also being participants. While one moderator makes a contribution as a participant, the other takes over, and vice versa. With only one moderator, we would be less flexible.

In order to facilitate our meeting, we were asking that papers/notes are sent in advance. A brief synopsis of 1 to 4 pages, with only major references, was planned to be available for each participant beforehand through this site. Longer papers were welcome as well, not least for the envisaged publications of the results of the meetings:

Victoria C. Fontan has kindly taken upon her the task to develop an edited book (with the help of Linda Hartling, Arie Nadler, and Evelin Lindner) starting with the contributions of the participants of our Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict in 2004. Please see Violent Conflict and Humiliation.

We have received the following suggestions for Round Table topics between January and September 2005:

Dharm P. S. Bhawuk:
"Theory, Method, and Practice of Humiliation Research"
This could also be a topic for our Open Space

Ana Ljubinkovic:
"Assistance and Humiliation"

Varda Mühlbauer:
"Humiliation/Dignity in the Workplace"
"Humiliation/Dignity in the Family"

Zahid Shahab Ahmed:
"Humiliation and Child Sexual Abuse"

Victoria C. Fontan:
"Terrorism and Humiliation" and
"Armed Conflict, Escalation and Humiliation"

Miriam Marton:
"Consequences of Humiliation"

Jörg Calliess:
"How to Prepare 'Non-Psychologists' (Human Rights Defenders, Peace Keepers, etc.) for Dealing with the Trauma of Humiliation in Victims"

Emmanuel Ndahimana:
"Ignorance and Humiliation"

Arie Nadler:
"Justice and Humiliation"

Alicia Cabezudo:
"Interlinking Peace Education and Humiliation Studies: A Bridge for Crossing Borders"

Frame

by Linda Hartling, 2004, Ph.D., Associate Director, Jean Baker Miller Training Institute, Wellesley College, Boston, USA.

In our meetings we aim at creating a humiliation-free, collaborative learning environment characterized by mutual respect, mutual empathy, and openness to difference. The perspective of "appreciative enquiry" is a useful frame of our work. Our HumanDHS efforts are not just about the work we do together, but also about HOW WE WORK TOGETHER. At appropriate points during our meetings, for example at the end of each day, we take a moment to reflect on the practices observed that contributed to an appreciative/humiliation-free learning experience.

It is important to emphasize that an appreciative approach is not about expecting people to agree. In fact, differences of opinion enrich the conversation and deepen people's understanding of ideas. Perhaps, this could be conceptualized as "waging good conflict," which means practicing radical respect for differences and being open to a variety of perspectives and engaging others without contempt or rankism. As we have seen in many fields, contempt and rankism drains energy away from the important work that needs to be done. Most people only know "conflict" as a form of war within a win/lose frame. "Waging good conflict," on the other side, is about being empathic and respectful, making room for authenticity, creating clarity, and growth.

Please read An Appreciative Frame: Beginning a Dialogue on Human Dignity and Humiliation, that Linda has written for us in 2005.

 


 

Programme


"Day Before," Wednesday, 14th September 2005

 

18.00: Restaurant

Eric Van Grasdorff found a nice restaurant.

 


 

 



Day One, Thursday, 15th September 2005

This part of the conference was closed to the public, the group was on its own.

9.00 Welcoming All Participants

Linda Hartling, and Donald Klein set the frame of our meeting within "Appreciative Enquiry." Please read An Appreciative Frame: Beginning a Dialogue on Human Dignity and Humiliation, that Linda has written for us in 2005.
We would like to thank Linda for keeping the entire conference together with her continuous caring interventions! And what would we be without Don's caring wisdom that always saves our meetings in crucial moments!
We would also like to thank Becca for untiringly taking the notes of our meeting!

9.15 Participants Presented Themselves

 

10.00 Two Presentations with Discussion:


•  10.00-11.15 Humiliation in a Globalising World: Does Humiliation Become the Most Disruptive Force?

Evelin Lindner, Founder of HumanDHS
This talk highlighted how globalisation is interlinked with new and unprecedented psychological dynamics that call for novel solutions at all levels - macro, meso and micro levels, and in all fields of public policy.
Please see the full paper here or at http://ssrn.com/abstract=668742 (this paper's SSRN ID is 668742)

11.15-11.30 Pause

•  11.30-13.00 Humiliation, Justice and Reconciliation

Arie Nadler, Professor of Psychology, Dean, Tel Aviv University, Faculty of Social Sciences. See here his paper from our 2004 NY meeting: How Dynamics of Humiliation Can Be Overcome by Apology
Arie Nadler kindly comments (2nd August 2005): I proposed the topic of "justice and humiliation" because I think it's extremely important and cuts across various key dimensions of the issue (e.g., formal systems of justice/punishment, truth committees and their role in healing humiliation in victims by restoring a sense of justice, etc.).

13.00-14.00 Restaurant "Anastasia"

 

14.00-16.30 Round Table 1 (2.30 hours): Assistance and Humiliation
Initiators Ana Ljubinkovic and Samir Sanad Basta

•  This topic links up to How to Prepare "Non-Psychologists" (Human Rights Defenders, Peace Keepers, etc.) for Dealing with the Trauma of Humiliation in Victims suggested by Jörg Calliess.
•  In many ways this theme is also relevant for Ignorance and Humiliation, a topic suggested by Emmanuel Ndahimana.
•  The topic Theory, Method, and Practice of Humiliation Research suggested by Dharm P. S. Bhawuk, which can also be a theme for our Open Space, cross-cuts all other topics and is of fundamental importance to all.

•  Samir Sanad Basta could unfortunately not join us, very unexpectedly, however, he kindly prepared a page on the intervention he wanted to give, please see Assistance, Dignity and Humiliation.

Moderators: Judith Thompson and Rick Slaven

We liked the Round Table discussion format we used in our 2004 NY meeting. Everyone has 5-10 minutes to present their entry point into the discussion, then we have an open discussion. 10 participants seems to be the maximum number that makes the discussion interesting and not overloaded. We have 2 empty chairs in the circle that can be taken by participants from the audience who wish to introduce a question or comment.
We also liked the experience from last year with two moderators for each Round Table. In that way, the moderators are not prevented from also being participants. While one moderator makes a contribution as a participant, the other takes over, and vice versa. With only one moderator, s/he would not be so flexible.

Participants:

Arie Nadler, Tel Aviv University, see his paper from our 2004 NY meeting: How Dynamics of Humiliation Can Be Overcome by Apology

Linda Hartling, Ph.D., Associate Director, Jean Baker Miller Training Institute, Wellesley College, Boston, USA. Linda Hartling is a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, Global Core Team, and Education Team. Please see her paper for our meeting Humiliation and Assistance: Telling the Truth About Power, Telling a New Story.

Ana Ljubinkovic, University of Essex, UK.
Please see her note prepared for this meeting, Milk and Urine: Intentional Humiliation as a part of Humanitarian Assistance.

Jörg Calliess, Director of Studies, Evangelische Akademie Loccum, Germany. Jörg Calliess is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.

Emmanuel Ndahimana, Member of the Parliament for the Rwanda Liberal Party until March 2005, now Vice Chairman of the Liberal Party (however, his contributions will not reflect the position of the Government of Rwanda, but his own). Emmanuel Ndahimana is the founder and President of Strategies 2000, a private Consulting Firm in Management specializing in project management, financial and economic analysis. He is also member of the National Nepad Commission. Emmanuel Ndahimana is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board. Please see his paper prepared for our meeting, Ignorance and Humiliation and a response by Laurien Ntezimana, Pour Eradiquer l'Humiliation.

Jean-Damascène Gasanabo, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Researcher, Rwanda, and University of Geneva, Switzerland. Jean-Damascène Gasanabo is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team, the Education Team, and the Research Team. He is part of the upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. The title of his project is African Refugees and Humiliation: Comparative Study on Refugees in Africa And in Europe.

Pandora Hopkins, Ph.D. (University of Pennsylvania), now a full-time writer living in Mexico, formerly a faculty member of Yale University, Rutgers University and CUNY (City University of New York). Please see her paper prepared for our meeting, House of Cards and the Use of Shame and Stigma as Strategy: A Folklore Study of an Elite Group.

Judith Thompson, Frontiers of Social Healing Dialogue, USA.

Rick Slaven, Ph.D., Administrator of the Martin Fisher School of Physics at Brandeis University in Waltham, USA. Rick Slaven is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.

Samir Sanad Basta, ScD., Former UNICEF director for Europe and former UNICEF Representative to the Sudan, author or Culture, Conflict & Children, University Press of America, 2000. Samir Basta is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and a Member of our Education Team.
Samir kindly writes (18th August, 2005):  I have hurt my back and now have a disc problem that is extremely painful. I am told by my doctor that I should not travel. [...] This meeting is indeed important, even more so today. It would have been an honour for me to attend;
I will, nevertheless, if you desire it, prepare a page of the intervention I wanted to give on "Assistance & humilation" and send this to you as soon as possible.

16.30-16.45 Pause

 

16.45-18.00 Round Table 2 (1.15 hours): Terrorism and Humiliation
Initiator: Victoria C. Fontan

•  This topic links up with Justice and Humiliation suggested by Arie Nadler.
•  It also links up with Armed Conflict, Escalation and Humiliation suggested by Victoria C. Fontan.
•  It furthermore connects to Consequences of Humiliation suggested by Miriam Marton.
•  In many ways this theme is also relevant for Ignorance and Humiliation, a topic suggested by Emmanuel Ndahimana.
•  The topic Theory, Method, and Practice of Humiliation Research suggested by Dharm P. S. Bhawuk, which can also be a theme for our Open Space, cross-cuts all other topics and is of fundamental importance to all.

Moderators: Judith Thompson and Rick Slaven

We liked the Round Table discussion format we used in our 2004 NY meeting. Everyone has 5-10 minutes to present their entry point into the discussion, then we have an open discussion. 10 participants seems to be the maximum number that makes the discussion interesting and not overloaded. We have 2 empty chairs in the circle that can be taken by participants from the audience who wish to introduce a question or comment.
We liked the experience from last year with two moderators for each Round Table. In that way, the moderators are not prevented from also being participants. While one moderator makes a contribution as a participant, the other takes over, and vice versa. With only one moderator, s/he would not be so flexible.

Participants:

Victoria C. Fontan, Director of the International Peace Studies Program at the United Nations University for Peace in San Jose, Costa Rica, since 2005. Prior to that, Assistant Professor of Conflict Resolution at Salahaddin University, Erbil, Iraq.

Magnus Haavelsrud, Professor, Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, Norway. Magnus Haavelsrud is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.

Miriam Marton, Lawyer, Detroit, USA. Miriam Marton is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team and the Research Team. She is part of the upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. The title of her project is The Dual Humiliation of Female Refugees by Sexually Violent, Gender-based Acts.
Please see furthermore Terrrorism and Humiliation, her note prepared for this Round Table

Judith Thompson, Frontiers of Social Healing Dialogue, USA.

Rick Slaven, Ph.D., Administrator of the Martin Fisher School of Physics at Brandeis University in Waltham, USA. Rick Slaven is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.

18:00 We Wrapped up the Day


19.30 Restaurant "Altes Zollhaus"

 



 

Day Two, Friday, 16th September 2005

 

9.00 Saying Good-Morning to Each Other

9.30 -10.00: Violent Conflict and Humiliation

Victoria C. Fontan has kindly taken upon her the task to develop an edited book (with the help of Linda Hartling, Arie Nadler, and Evelin Lindner) starting with the contributions of the participants of our Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict in 2004. Please see Violent Conflict and Humiliation. She reported on the progress of this project.

10.00 -10.30: Terrorism and Humiliation

Paul Stokes, Senior Lecturer, Department of Sociology at the National University of Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.
Paul Stokes a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and Global Core Team. He is the Director of our Research Agenda.

10.30- 12.00: "Open Space" Facilitated by Don Klein

Everybody was invited to engage and be visible and create your own "Round Table."

Donald Klein explains the Open Space design as follows: It involves creating a kind of "marketplace" of possibilities based on topics nominated by participants. The only requirement is that whoever nominates the topic, acts as the convener of the discussion of the topic and takes responsibility for having notes taken. A report is subsequently made about the essence of what was discussed, including any conclusions or recommendations, at a plenary session following the topic groups.

The Open Space design has the advantage of focussing on whatever is of greatest interest to participants at the moment. It allows for parallel discussion of multiple topics, followed by a period of sharing and general discussion.

Two session topics emerged: "Research" and "Business":

•  Research (in two parts)

•  Evelin Lindner and Paul Stokes led a discussion on the state-of-affairs of the Terrorism & Humiliation and Refugees and & Humiliation projects.

Evelin had a meeting at the United Nations University in Tokyo (UNU) on 21st July 2004 and subsequently prepared a proposal for an edited book on humiliation. She went through the HumanDHS's Global Advisory Board's members list and envisaged what each member of the Board would be able to contribute as conceptual chapter.

After Evelin's second meeting at UNU (3rd March 2005), HumanDHS was encouraged to build a larger empirical approach, and upon discussing with Paul, Evelin sent out a call for young scholars. She collected and selected the incoming replies and built two proposals for edited books (Terrorism & Humiliation, and Refugees & Humiliation). This set-up envisages conceptual chapters written by senior experts on the topic of humiliation as first part, and then, in a second part, case studies by faculty members who guide research by younger scholars (transdisciplinary, from all parts of the world, gender-balanced).

Paul became active subsequent to this phase. He took Evelin's work and changed the format insofar as he did not use the edited book format but a project proposal format where only the case studies were included, with an introduction in large parts written by Paul. Both, the edited book version and the proposal version of the Terrorism & Humiliation and Refugees & Humiliation projects were subsequently submitted to UNU (between June and September 2005) and met UNU's interest.

The next step is to negotiate with UNU and funders so as to assemble the funding packages.

•  Vidar Vambheim led a discussion on the conceptual and methodological aspects of doing research on humiliation.

•  Business

Emmanuel Ndahimana led an initiative to build a business branch for Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, in cooperation with Linda Hartling, Rick Slaven, and Victoria Fontan.

Prior to our "Open Space" event, Emmanuel shared with Evelin his ideas of a business-oriented application of HumanDHS's ideas. Evelin encouraged him to propose this topic in the Open Space. His ideas are in line with long-term plans by HumanDHS. HumanDHS wishes to build bridges between academia and practice, with the corporate world as important player. Since 1995, Lindner is part of a network of consultants to the corporate sector in Norway, please see also Ragnhild Grødal. In 2001, Lindner has developed a project entitled Humiliation, Human Rights and Global Corporate Responsibility. In HumanDHS's Global Advisory Board, we have several members, who are building bridges with the corporate sector, please see, for example, apart from Ragnhild Grødal, also Heidi von Weltzien Høivik, See also our World Business for Equal Dignity project in our Intervention Agenda. Several other projects in our Intervention Agenda aim at using business approaches to fund our research, please see our Interventions page and, among others, our World Clothes for Equal Dignity project, World Architecture for Equal Dignity project, World Art for Equal Dignity project, World Furniture for Equal Dignity project, or our World Design for Equal Dignity project.

12.00 - 13.00: Restaurant "Anastasia"

13.00 - 16.00: Plenum presentations of the previous "Open Space" sessions, facilitated by Don Klein

16.00 - 18.00: Visit of the Jewish Museum / Board Meeting

 

19.30 Restaurant



 

 

Day Three, Saturday, 17th September 2005

 

9.00 Saying Good-Morning to Each Other

 

9.30-10.30 Round Table 3 (1 hour): Interlinking Peace Education and Humiliation Studies: A Bridge for Crossing Borders
Initiator Alicia Cabezudo

•  In many ways this theme is also relevant for Ignorance and Humiliation, a topic suggested by Emmanuel Ndahimana.
•  The topic Theory, Method, and Practice of Humiliation Research suggested by Dharm P. S. Bhawuk, which can also be a theme for our Open Space, cross-cuts all other topics and is of fundamental importance to all.

•  Alicia Cabezudo was unexpectedly hindered to attend our meeting.

•  Please be aware of a planned Special Issue, entitled "Humiliation in the Academic Setting" to which you might wish to contribute!
Editor: Dakshinamoorthi Raja Ganesan
Guest Editor: Annette A. Engler

Moderators: Miriam Marton and Ana Ljubinkovic

We liked the Round Table discussion format we used in our 2004 NY meeting. Everyone has 5-10 minutes to present their entry point into the discussion, then we have an open discussion. 10 participants seems to be the maximum number that makes the discussion interesting and not overloaded. We have 2 empty chairs in the circle that can be taken by participants from the audience who wish to introduce a question or comment.
We also liked the experience from last year with two moderators for each Round Table. In that way, the moderators are not prevented from also being participants. While one moderator makes a contribution as a participant, the other takes over, and vice versa. With only one moderator, s/he would not be so flexible.

Participants:

Magnus Haavelsrud, Professor, Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, Norway. Magnus Haavelsrud is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.

Linda Hartling, Ph.D., Associate Director, Jean Baker Miller Training Institute, Wellesley College, Boston, USA. Linda Hartling is a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, Global Core Team, and Education Team. Please see her paper for our meeting Humiliation and Assistance: Telling the Truth About Power, Telling a New Story.

Thomas Clough Daffern, Director, International Institute of Peace Studies and Global Philosophy, Wales and London, UK. Thomas Daffern is a Member of our Global Core Team. He will be so kind as to join us from Friday evening to Sunday. Thomas Clough Daffern is one of the Directors and Coordinators of the HumanDHS Cross-Cultural Linguistics for Equal Dignity Project.
Please see Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People, Thomas' paper for our meeting.

Miriam Marton, Lawyer, Detroit, USA. Miriam Marton is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team and the Research Team. She is part of the upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. The title of her project is The Dual Humiliation of Female Refugees by Sexually Violent, Gender-based Acts.
Please see furthermore Humiliation in the Home: Survivors of Childhood Rape in the United States, her note prepared for our meeting.

Ana Ljubinkovic, University of Essex, UK.
Please see her note prepared for this meeting, Milk and Urine: Intentional Humiliation as a part of Humanitarian Assistance.

Alicia Cabezudo, Educating Cities Latin America (International Relations Bureau, Municipality of Rosario, Argentina). Alicia Cabezudo is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and Research Team. She is an Academic Advisor for our upcoming Terrorism and Humiliation Project, and Refugees and Humiliation Project.
Alicia Cabezudo was unexpectedly hindered to attend our meeting.

10.30-11.30 Round Table 4 (1 hour): Humiliation/Dignity in the Family and Workplace
Initiator Varda Mühlbauer

•  This topic connects also to Humiliation and Child Sexual Abuse suggested by Zahid Shahab Ahmed.
•  In many ways this theme is also relevant for Ignorance and Humiliation, a topic suggested by Emmanuel Ndahimana.
•  The topic Theory, Method, and Practice of Humiliation Research suggested by Dharm P. S. Bhawuk, which can also be a theme for our Open Space, cross-cuts all other topics and is of fundamental importance to all.

Moderators: Jean-Damascène Gasanabo and Christine Locher

We liked the Round Table discussion format we used in our 2004 NY meeting. Everyone has 5-10 minutes to present their entry point into the discussion, then we have an open discussion. 10 participants seems to be the maximum number that makes the discussion interesting and not overloaded. We have 2 empty chairs in the circle that can be taken by participants from the audience who wish to introduce a question or comment.
We also liked the experience from last year with two moderators for each Round Table. In that way, the moderators are not prevented from also being participants. While one moderator makes a contribution as a participant, the other takes over, and vice versa. With only one moderator, s/he would not be so flexible.

Participants:

Varda Mühlbauer, Professor, Academic College of Netanya, Israel. Varda Mühlbauer is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.

Paul Stokes, Senior Lecturer, Department of Sociology at the National University of Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.
Paul Stokes a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and Global Core Team. He is the Director of our Research Agenda.

Miriam Marton, Lawyer, Detroit, USA. Miriam Marton is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team and the Research Team. She is part of the upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. The title of her project is The Dual Humiliation of Female Refugees by Sexually Violent, Gender-based Acts.
Please see furthermore Humiliation in the Home: Survivors of Childhood Rape in the United States, her note prepared for our meeting.

Pandora Hopkins, Ph.D. (University of Pennsylvania), now a full-time writer living in Mexico, formerly a faculty member of Yale University, Rutgers University and CUNY (City University of New York). Please see her paper prepared for our meeting, House of Cards and the Use of Shame and Stigma as Strategy: A Folklore Study of an Elite Group.

Christine Locher, Journalist, Germany.

Jean-Damascène Gasanabo, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Researcher, Rwanda, and University of Geneva, Switzerland. Jean-Damascène Gasanabo is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team, the Education Team, and the Research Team. He is part of the upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. The title of his project is African Refugees and Humiliation: Comparative Study on Refugees in Africa And in Europe.

12.00-13.00 Lunch

13.00 - 17.00: Public Conference on "Humiliation in Intercultural Relations"

Heinrich Böll Foundation
Hackesche Höfe
Rosenthaler Str. 40/41
10178 Berlin
How to find it | public transport (pdf)

Humiliation in Intercultual Relations
Introduction by Evelin Lindner, March 2005
We live in historic times that increase the potential for destructive conflict in several ways: Firstly, our world shrinks. Increasingly we find ourselves in intercultural encounters, which amplify the chances for mutual misunderstandings and ill feelings. Particularly, when mutual respect is felt to be lacking, feelings of humiliation are being triggered and resentment becomes rife. What is most needed in a shrinking world, namely cooperation, is then hampered. Global terrorism may just be the "tip of the iceberg" indicating that there may be a sea of feelings of humiliation and resentment "out there," where "humiliation-entrepreneurs" can thrive.

Secondly, we live in the midst of a moral revolution the human rights revolution. Formerly, underlings were expected to accept their lowly lot as god-given. Nowadays, increasingly, underlings learn that being at the bottom represents a violation of their human rights. Article 1 of the of the Human Rights Declaration states that every human being is born with equal dignity (and ought not be humiliated). Consequently, scores of underlings around the world learn to feel violated and humiliated by their lowly position.

In this public event, we wished to draw attention to the need to become aware of the challenges of our historic times. One of the core challenges is to harness existing cycles of humiliation, and, if possible, prevent future cycles of humiliation. HumanDHS organized this day in order to raise awareness and encourage action.

Participants:

Lord Ralf Dahrendorf (unfortunately, he could not attend), former Director of the der London School of Economics (LSE), now Social Science Reserach Center Berlin will kindly give us the honour of attending our public event on Saturday. Hopefully, he will also be with us during the rest of our meeting.

•  First Talk

Evelin Lindner, Founder of HumanDHS
Humiliation in a Globalising World and Intercultural Encounters (Erniedrigung im interkulturellen Austausch)
(40 minutes including discussion)

Please see as background material:
Humiliation in a Globalizing World: Does Humiliation Become the Most Disruptive Force?

and
Recognition or Humiliation - The Psychology of Intercultural Communication

•  Second Talk

Arie Nadler (Tel Aviv University)
Assistance in Intercultural Settings and its Links with Dignity and Humiliation

(40 minutes including discussion)

Please see as background material:
Arie Nadler, together with Tamar Saguy
Reconciliation Between Nations: Overcoming Emotional Deterrents to Ending Conflicts Between Groups
In Langholtz, Harvey and Stout, Chris E. (Eds.), The Psychology of Diplomacy , New York, NY: Praeger, 2004.
Arie comments this chapter as follows: The empirical paper which Tamar wrote is reported (in part) in the chapter. It is an analysis of the pitfalls in reciprocal assistance in "joint Israeli-Palestinian projects". It basically asked the question: Which projects survived and continued despite the tensions of the Intifada, and which folded? It does say a lot about equality in giving and receiving assistance (the hallmark of true cooperation). Unfortunately, it was published in an Israeli journal (in Hebrew). But the chapter may still be relevant.

and
Arie Nadler
Inter-Group Helping Relations As Power Relations: Maintaining or Challenging Social Dominance Between Groups Through Helping.
In Journal of Social Issues, 58 (3, March), pp. 487-502, 2002.

Panel discussion with the audience

Don Klein, Victoria C. Fontan, Arie Nadler, Evelin Lindner, Linda Hartling

Please see reactions:

Vidar Vambheim (2005)
Questions in connection with Arie's presentation:
Arie reports that only projects that addressed basic needs (agriculture, etc.) survived when the last Intifada began. All projects that involved identity, did not survive.
Vidar asks: Can we think of educational projects which involve identity & self which work as well as the projects concerning agriculture, etc.? Can we think of co-educational projects which could help both, the self-feeling and self-esteem in both parties?

Charlotte Brenk (2005)
Humiliation in Intercultural Relations
Anregungen und Gedanken zur Konferenz vom Samstag, dem 17.9.2005

18.00: Cinema Berliner Filmtheater Hackesche Höfe

Film: A Long Night's Journey into Day

20.00 End of Day Three

20.00: Thai Restaurant GoodWill


 

"Day After," Sunday, 18th September 2005

 

 

11.00: Checkpoint Charlie

 

14.00: Boat Tour

 

18.00: Chinese Restaurant in Kantstrasse


 

Participants
(with their personal messages to the other participants)

•  Lord Ralf Dahrendorf (unfortunately, he could not attend), former Director of the der London School of Economics (LSE), now Social Science Reserach Center Berlin will kindly give us the honour of attending our public event on Saturday. Hopefully, he will also be with us during the rest of our meeting.

•  Linda Hartling, Ph.D., Associate Director, Jean Baker Miller Training Institute, Wellesley College, Boston, USA. Linda Hartling is a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, Global Core Team, and Education Team.
Please see here Humiliation: Assessing the Impact of Derision, Degradation, and Debasement, first Published by: The Journal of Primary Prevention, 19(4): 259-278, co-authored with T. Luchetta, 1999,
and please see also:
Shame and Humiliation: From Isolation to Relational Transformation
, the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMIT), Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College No. 88, Wellesley, MA 02481, co-authored with Wendy Rosen, Maureen Walker, Judith V. Jordan, 2000.
Linda kindly proposes as overall topic for our meeting
"Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People."
Linda writes (28th April 2005) in response to Bhawuk: I think you have a good point, Bhawuk. Perhaps it would be nice to have a "theme" to give us a common thread throughout the meeting?  This could help us communicate what we expect to accomplish with this meeting.  I am trying to think of a theme that would be broad enough to include the Round Table topics, e.g., "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People." Please see her paper for our meeting Humiliation and Assistance: Telling the Truth About Power, Telling a New Story.

•  Rick Slaven, Ph.D., Administrator of the Martin Fisher School of Physics at Brandeis University in Waltham, USA. Rick Slaven is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.

•  Donald Klein, Professor Emeritus, Union Institute and University, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. Donald Klein is a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and Global Core Team. He is furthermore the Director of our Education Team.
Please see here Community MetaFunctions and the Humiliation Dynamic, paper presented at the 2nd Annual Meeting on Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, Paris, France, September 16-18, 2004 (not to be cited without author's authorization).
Please see also
Appreciative Psychology: An Antidote to Humiliation, final paper prepared for the Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, November 18-19, 2004.
Don kindly writes (18th May 2005): Yesterday I saw a 50 minute film called "Palestine is Still the Issue." It’s about the Israeli occupation of Palestine territories that focuses almost entirely on the humiliation of the Palestinians! I'd like to bring to the Berlin conference and use it for a two-hour session in which I lead a discussion based on the film of what are the factors that lead people to humiliate others and what approaches might any of us use that might lead Israeli leaders to change their way of dealing with what they experience as a life-and-death threat. This could be part of our film day or it could be scheduled as a program "presentation" and discussion on one of the preceding days. What do you think? Please let me know who you think I should contact to see about getting the film and discussion on the agenda for Berlin.
Don kindly writes (4th July, 2005): Hello, Evelin -- I agree that the Round Table approach worked very well and should prove to be equally profitable at the December 2005 meeting. The Open Space approach is not something, however, that will work well if "tucked in" between scheduled sessions that have been preplanned. To be successful, Open Space requires a general over-all topic that is of interest and importance to all participants. It needs at least a full day, during which there can be three or four rounds of discussion groups on aspects of the general topic that are proposed by participants themselves. If we were to use Open Space, an overall topic that would be of great interest to me has to do with developing effective approaches to dealing with those groups and nations that inflict humiliation on other groups or nations. I'm thinking, for example, of humiliation experienced by Palestinians at Israeli hands, of Irish Catholics' experience of humiliation at Protestant Catholic hands, and of Muslim experience of humiliation at the hands of Christian nations.
I realize that the same overall topic would lend itself to a series of Round Tables similar to the approach we used last year. The Round Table approach has the advantage of making it possible to ask one or more people to develop in advance brief papers that would stimulate subsequent discussion. If one goal is to publish a book of papers and discussions from the annual conferences, then the Round Table approach seems preferable.
Another topic that would lend itself to Round Table discussions has to do with educational approaches to reducing or eliminating humiliation and promoting human dignity, including, for example, Round Tables on creating humiliation free environments for the education of children, use of media for public education on promoting human dignity, and inter-group methods for dealing with humiliating intercommunal conflicts.
I also want to add the following possible option, suggested by Alan. If we decide to organize the conference around an Open Space Design, it would still be possible to encourage people (perhaps to get specific commitments from certain ones) to prepare working papers in advance of the conference. These papers might be circulated in advance via internet and also be available at the conference as hard copies. In this way, participants would have the chance to be informed on certain topics, which later individuals might select for the spontaneous discussion groups that are so important to the Open Space design. With love, Don.

•  Rebecca Klein, A graduate of Hampshire College, USA. Rebecca Klein is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team.
Becca is Don's daughter and very kindly maintains our internal database. She has, furthermore, with breathtaking efficiency, prepared the notes for all our past meetings.

•  Paul Stokes, Senior Lecturer, Department of Sociology at the National University of Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.
Paul Stokes a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and Global Core Team. He is the Director of our Research Agenda.

•  Victoria C. Fontan, is the Director of the International Peace Studies Program at the United Nations University for Peace in San Jose, Costa Rica, since 2005. As a Fellow to the Iraq Project at the CICR in Columbia University, Victoria is in charge of developing a permanent Conflict Resolution curriculum in northern Iraqi universities.
Victoria Fontan is a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, and a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team, and the Research Team.
Victoria has kindly taken upon her the task to develop an edited book with your contributions.
Victoria is also part of our upcoming Terrorism and Humiliation Project. The title of her 2008 book is Voices from Post-Saddam Iraq: Living with Terrorism, Insurgency, and New Forms of Tyranny (Westport, CT: Greenwood/Praeger Security International).
Please see furthermore The Dialectics of Humiliation: Polarization between Occupier and Occupied in Post-Saddam Iraq, unpublished draft (not to be cited without author's authorization).
Victoria kindly proposes as one of the Round Table topics
"Terrorism and Humiliation" or
"Armed Conflict, Escalation and Humiliation"
She writes (26th April 2005): Dear Evelin, I am glad to see that our agenda is setting itself up. Myself, I would like to have a Round Table on terrorism and humiliation, but I guess that there might not be enough of us for it. If this is the case, how about armed conflict, escalation and humiliation?

•  Arie Nadler, Professor of Social Psychology, Dean, Tel Aviv University, Israel. Arie Nadler is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and Research Team. He is an Academic Advisor for our Terrorism and Humiliation Project.
see his paper from our 2004 NY meeting: How Dynamics of Humiliation Can Be Overcome by Apology
Arie kindly proposes as one of the Round Table topics "Justice and Humiliation." He writes (28th April 2005): Dear Evelin, the exchange about the Berlin meeting is exciting. I think all the ideas that were brought by people are excellent. I was drawn especially to the idea by Ana and Samir (i.e., Assistance and Humiliation). Probably because it touches on what had been my interests over the years (i.e., the threat to self-esteem that is inherent in seeking and receiving help)...
Another topic that may be of interest to the Berlin meeting (or another upcoming meeting) is: "Justice and Humiliation." I refer to the ways in which different principles of justice (mainly retributive vs. restorative justice) are driven by the desire to impose/avoid humiliation on the wrongdoer. I am currently reading some stuff on retributive and restorative justice systems and find myself fascinated by the potential integrative power of the concept of humiliation in such discussions.

•  Samir Sanad Basta, ScD., Former UNICEF director for Europe and former UNICEF Representative to the Sudan, author or Culture, Conflict & Children, University Press of America, 2000. Samir Basta is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and a Member of our Education Team.
Samir kindly writes (27th April 2005): Dear Evelin. I think Ana Ljubinkovic's title SHOULD be "Assistance & Humiliation". This is an important topic and given my experience in UN relief operations, it is one in which I would like to participate. I would add a "cultural" element to this as well, basically sometimes the humiliation felt by people of one culture in being helped by people of another culture. And there are some unexpected twists here for people belonging to sometimes similar cultures; their help can at times be resented more than receiving help from "The White Man's" culture… How, why etc., this operates could be the discussion point I would like to speak about if possible… All the best, Samir
Samir kindly writes (18th August, 2005):  I have hurt my back and now have a disc problem that is extremely painful. I am told by my doctor that I should not travel. [...] This meeting is indeed important, even more so today. It would have been an honour for me to attend;
I will, nevertheless, if you desire it, prepare a page of the intervention I wanted to give on "Assistance & humilation" and send this to you as soon as possible.

•  Magnus Haavelsrud, Professor, Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, Norway. Magnus Haavelsrud is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.

•  Judith Thompson, Frontiers of Social Healing Dialogue, USA.
Judith Thompson kindly writes (13th June, 2005): Dear Evelin: Don Klein suggested that I contact you about the conference in Berlin in September. I have recently completed my doctoral dissertation on on the question of how compassion arises in the process of social healing. Don was my reader. I was very pleased that he thought the dissertation was "exemplary" (to use his words) and that it he thought I could both gain from and contribute to the conference.
In my work I had a section on humiliation, noting that the recent interest in understanding humiliation (begun by Don and carried on so brilliantly by you!) is one of the moves toward the relational roots of conflict which constitute what I call the social healing paradigm (which stresses the holistic and systems aspects of peacebuilding work). My interest in compassion been the product of my decades of work in the field ­ mostly in peace education, cultural/community organizing, and international dialogue, and running an international non-profit for over a decade. The themes of enlarging one’s self concept and self-experience through the connection to other’s suffering has been central to that work (as well as personally enlightening and enriching). I will be sharing some of my research at a conference in Sarajevo this summer on Global Human Rights, together with Ken Suslak, who I believe has also been in contact with you. I would love to both share my own work and learn from others in Berlin, and hope to hear more from you about how that might occur. A little bit of information on what I’ve been doing can be found here: http://69.36.178.127/resources/thompson/thompson.html and
http://69.36.178.127/resources/restore_justice/carsarjianthompson.html
I look forward to hearing from you. And, thank you for the wonderful work you have been doing! Judith Thompson.

•  Emmanuel Ndahimana, Member of the Parliament for the Rwanda Liberal Party until March 2005, now Vice Chairman of the Liberal Party (however, his contributions will not reflect the position of the Government of Rwanda, but his own). Emmanuel Ndahimana is the founder and President of Strategies 2000, a private Consulting Firm in Management specializing in project management, financial and economic analysis. He is also member of the National Nepad Commission. Emmanuel Ndahimana is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Emmanuel kindly proposes as one of the Round Table topics
"Ignorance and Humiliation"
He writes (27th April 2005): Dear Evelin, since I'm attending for the first time, I better keep quiet and listen. For example I could attend the round table on Consequences of Humiliation. Otherwise, I could talk about "Ignorance and Humiliation" concentrating on the case of Rwanda.
Please see his paper prepared for "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005, Ignorance and Humiliation and a response by Laurien Ntezimana, Pour Eradiquer l'Humiliation.
Sylvia Ndahimana, Emmanuel Ndahimana's daughter, Paris, will kindly join us, too.

•  Hassan Abdi Keynan, Programme Specialist Education, UNESCO office in Islamabad, Pakistan. Hassan Keynan is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
He kindly writes (27th April 2005): "Terrorism and Humiliation" is a good suggestion. Hassan
He kindly writes (1st August 2005)
I intend to come for the meeting on 14 and stay until 16th. I will return on the afternoon of 16th.

•  Varda Mühlbauer, Professor, Academic College of Netanya, Israel. Varda Mühlbauer is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Varda kindly proposes as one of the Round Table topics: "Humiliation/Dignity in the Workplace." She also proposes "Humiliation/Dignity in the Family"
She writes (26th April 2005): I am interested in issues related to humiliation/dignity in the workplace (I think that another excellent discussion can relate to the same issues in the family). Maybe there are additional participants who are interested in this or related issues. It can be raised in the format of an interest group or round table. I feel the need to hear participants' thoughts and experiences in culturally diversified work places. The discussion can lead to collaborative research and action plans.

•  Jörg Calliess, Director of Studies, Evangelische Akademie Loccum, Germany. Jörg Calliess is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Jörg Calliess kindly proposes as one of the round table topics: "How to Prepare 'Non-Psychologists' (Human Rights Defenders, Peace Keepers, etc.) for Dealing with the Trauma of Humiliation in Victims"
He writes (27th April 2005): thinking about the topics for our meeting in Berlin I would like to propose that we should also try to speak about the people who are working in conflict management and peace building processes and who are confronted with casualties of humiliation. Is it really possible to psyche them up for the experience? I myself am not an expert in that field. I can not submit a paper dealing with the problem. However, speaking with peace workers I very often heard that they were not prepared for the encounter with casualties of humiliation.
Jörg Calliess kindly writes ( 25th August 2005): Ganz in Eile: Liebe Frau Lindner, es ist ganz toll, wie viel Mühe Sie sich machen mit der Vorbereitung. Ich habe mir alles erst mal nur kurz ansehen koennen. Ich war 6 Wochen weg und gehe jetzt unter in Post und e-mails. Und verschiedene Auswärtstermine stehen schon wieder bevor!
Deshalb nur kurz: ich glaube, dass Ihre Planungen genau meine Interessen treffen. Allerdings sehe ich keine Möglichkeit, einen Beitrag vorzubereiten oder ein Papier einzureichen. Ich habe ja eigentlich keine Expertise in dem Feld sonder Bedarf an Expertise!!!
Ich will gerne in dem Panel mitdiskutieren, aber hoffentlich erwartet von mir niemand mehr als Fragen! In Eile (leider mal wieder), gruesst Sie (gleichwohl aber ganz herzlich), Joerg Calliess
Evelin's reply:
Das Feld Humiliation Studies ist so neu, lieber Jörg, niemand hat "Antworten." Wir alle sind uns den "Löchern" bewusst und fragen ist eigentlich das, was wir alle tun. Also, keine Sorge, Ihre Situation ist gar nicht ungewöhnlich! Der Geist oder die Vision unserer Gruppe ist es, zusammen einen spannenden Prozess der Suche zu betreiben! Sie sind also genau richtig! Es sind ja immer die Fragezeichen, die uns am meisten weiterbringen... Für mich wird ein Thema langweilig und ich glaube, es ist ein Zeichen, dass es auch generell gesellschaftlich irrelevant wird, wenn es keine Fragezeichen mehr gibt...

•  Ana Ljubinkovic, University of Essex, UK. Ana Ljubinkovic is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Board, and Research Team.
Ana kindly proposes as one of the Round Table topics: "Assistance and Humiliation"
She writes (26th April 2005): I think that my input to the meeting will be related to the results of the field research that I am currently doing in Nairobi. Besides investigating the psychological effects of armed humanitarian interventions, I have been able to observe current relations between various UN offices and the people they are supposed to help. There are many interesting findings I will be happy to share with all of you. The general topic could be called "Assistance and Humiliation" or something like that. I hope it can be of interest to all of you. Please see her note prepared for this meeting, Milk and Urine: Intentional Humiliation as a part of Humanitarian Assistance.

•  Lene Lafosse, University of Oslo, Norway. Lene Lafosse is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Board, the Education Team, and the Research Team. Zahid has just been awarded the Jawan Pakistan Youth Service Award.
Lene kindly writes to us (1st May 2005): I am looking at the possible protection of traumatized children that have been abused violently and/or sexually by caretakers/parents, particularely children who are at risk of abuse when they are visiting the violent and/or abusive parent they are not living with everyday. Both Zahid Shahab Ahmed and Varda Muhlbauer have suggested round table topics on related subjects, and I would very much like to adress these themes.
Lene kindly writes again (29th June 2005): I see from the program that you are asking for a round table topic for day 3, 1100-1200. Personally I would very much like to continue on such topics as: Â "Humiliation/Dignity in the Workplace", "Humiliation/Dignity in the Family" and "Humiliation and Child Sexual Abuse". My suggestion is to discuss "Humiliation/Dignity in the Workplace" from 0930-1030 and continue with "Humiliation/Dignity in the Family" AND "Humiliation and Child Sexual Abuse" from 1100-1200. However, the topics does not seem to be of special interest to a great number of participants, so for that reason I do not know if it is such a good idea...?
Lene kindly writes to us (17th August 2005): I am sorry to tell you that due to an unexpected event, I can not travel to Berlin in September. I am looking forward to another possibility to meet you all! In the meantime I will keep myself updated on the Human dhs webpages. Yours, Lene Lafosse.

•  Christine Locher, Journalist, Germany.
I can be at the conference as planned on Saturday, and I managed to get Thursday off as well, but I will have to be at the office on Friday, hoping I can make it to dinner to join you. But the good news is that I will at least have the evenings and Thursday and Sat/Sun to finally meet you all. Can't wait! Christine.

•  Vidar Vambheim, Associate Professor, Coordinator of Tromsø Peace Studies, Department of Education, University of Tromsø, Norway.

•  Mari Otterlei Blikom (Norway) has a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from University of Western Australia, Perth. Mari Otterlei Blikom is a Member of the Research Team. She is part of the upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. The title of his project is A Qualitative Study on Humiliation among Refugees in Norway. Please see her note prepared for our meeting Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People.

•  Jean-Damascène Gasanabo, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Researcher, Rwanda, and University of Geneva, Switzerland (hopefully). Jean-Damascène Gasanabo is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team, the Education Team, and the Research Team. He is part of the upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. The title of his project is African Refugees and Humiliation: Comparative Study on Refugees in Africa And in Europe.

•  Olivier du Merle, Paris, France. Olivier du Merle is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board. (hopefully)

•  Alicia Cabezudo, Professor, Educating Cities Latin America (International Relations Bureau, Municipality of Rosario, Argentina). Alicia Cabezudo is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and Research Team. She is an Academic Advisor for our upcoming Terrorism and Humiliation Project, and Refugees and Humiliation Project.
Alicia kindly proposes as one of the Round Table topics
"Interlinking Peace Education and Humiliation Studies: A Bridge for Crossing Borders"
She writes (28th April 2005): Dear Evelin and All, I very much support a table on "Consequences of Humiliation." It has a wide and interdisciplinary perspective, in the short - medium and long term. Another title: "Interlinking Peace Education and Humiliation Studies: a bridge for crossing borders."
Alicia writes (16th May 2005): I am very interested in participating in the round table published as Terrorism and Humiliation from the view of the humiliation suffered during dictatorships in Latin America - prisoners in jail or from the political-social point of view - I mean not only a personal humiliation suffering but a collective humiliation suffering- which is worst from my point of view -
I can present a kind of history - methods - and ways of avoiding systematic humiliation created by prisoners during the terror years. Also by the society as a whole or at least by some social associations like the Madres de Plaza de Mayo, the Abuelas, university groups, workers trade unions, some political parties.
13th September 2005: Alicia might unexpectedy be unable to come.

•  Corinna Carmen Gayer, Berlin. Corinna Carmen Gayer is a Member of the HumanDHS Research Team. She is part of our upcoming Terrorism and Humiliation Project. The title of her project is The Feeling of Being Humiliated by "the Other" - Palestinian and Israeli Women in the Middle-East Conflict.

•  Miriam Marton, Lawyer, Detroit, USA. Miriam Marton is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team and the Research Team. She is part of the upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. The title of her project is The Dual Humiliation of Female Refugees by Sexually Violent, Gender-based Acts.
Miriam kindly writes (27th April 2005): I was thinking about topics for our Berlin meeting. Have we ever done a table on the "Consequences of Humiliation"?
She writes later (28th April 2005): I just looked at the website with all the proposals and am wondering if I could clone myself to participate in all of them - they all sound so amazing!! In terms of the question regarding whether they should be based on individual topics or burning issues, I think for the most part the proposals are of burning issues in today's war-torn world.
She writes later (29th April 2005): My dear Evelin, what an amazing meeting this is going to be! At this time, while I would like to participate in everything, my "top four" would probably be the following:
1. Consequences and Humiliation
2. Justice and Humiliation
3. Terrorism and Humiliation
4. Assistance and Humiliation
I think Arie's proposal on Justice and Humiliation, specifically looking at the humiliation that we often want to inflict on the wrongdoer, is an important idea and very relevant in terms of understanding humiliation, the desire to humiliate, and the desire to develop an ability to resolve issues in ways without humiliation.
Please see Humiliation in the Home: Survivors of Childhood Rape in the United States, Miriam's note prepared for our meeting.

•  Thomas Daffern, Director, International Institute of Peace Studies and Global Philosophy, Wales and London, UK. Thomas Daffern is a Member of our Global Core Team. He will be so kind as to join us from Friday evening to Sunday. Thomas Clough Daffern is the Director and Coordinator of the HumanDHS Cross-Cultural Linguistics for Equal Dignity Project. Please see Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People, Thomas' paper for our meeting.

•  Pandora Hopkins, Ph.D. (University of Pennsylvania), now a full-time writer living in Mexico, formerly a faculty member of Yale University, Rutgers University and CUNY (City University of New York).
Pandora kindly writes (28th June 2005): Thanks for your warm welcome; I am looking forward much indeed to meeting you and to hearing from people who have been researching and working with matters of my intimate concern. All of the round table topics are interesting to me, but three of them impinge directly on my own subject of research: humiliation and family, humiliation and assistance, and humiliation and justice (as noted below). So I would be interested in participating in discussions on any of these.
Paper Presentation: House of Cards Supported by Shame and Stigma: a folkloric study of strategies used by the elite and powerful group now in U.S. ascendancy.
Round Table Input: I am particularly interested in "Humiliation/Dignity in the Family" proposed by Varda Muhlbauer; Assistance and Humiliation (Ana Ljubinkovic); and Justice and Humiliation (Arie Nadler)
Please see her paper prepared for our meeting, House of Cards and the Use of Shame and Stigma as Strategy: A Folklore Study of an Elite Group.

•  Steve Perry Flythe, Teachers College, Columbia University, NY.

•  Annette A. Engler, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA (hopefully). Annette Engler is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team and Education Team.
Please see the Special Symposium Issue that Annette is preparing together with D. Raja Ganesan.

•  Michael Kimmel, Professor, State University of New York, Stony Brook, USA (hopefully). Michael Kimmel is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.

•  George Woods, Professor, University of Washington, USA (hopefully). George Woods is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and Education Team.

•  Stephanie Heuer, Randol Elementary School, CA, USA (hopefully). Stephanie Heuer is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team and Education Team.
Please see the educational book that Safa created, inspired by our 2004 Paris meeting and Robert Fuller's work on Rankism. She is publishing this book by herself, so please write to her for a copy, safa40 at hotmail.com: I Feel Like Nobody When … I Feel Like Somebody When …
On 20th May 2005, Stephanie writes saying that she might not be able to come to Berlin, but that she would like to present her book at our NY meeting in December, and explain the process she went through from our group's last meeting in Paris until now. The theme would be: Children and Dignity, A template for Change. Safa writes:
The reason I say template for change is this: I think we all recognize that there are humiliating acts going on all the time, at many different levels, as well as, violations of our dignity. What I feel I needed is a course for change, a way to feel and act differently. Bob's book inspired me to change the way I processed emotions. I came back and resigned from my job (which was not accepted), based on Rankism. Things changed. After I did my research in the area of my students answering the two questions, their responses floored me. Their responses CHANGED the way I looked at them, and the way I taught as an educator. I listen closer, I don't embarrass students, I process thought differently.
We NEED templates for change. It is great to recognize problems, now we need to come up with simple and direct ways to change the way people treat and perceive the people around them.

•  Craig Dorsi, Teachers College, Columbia University, NY (hopefully).

•  Zahid Shahab Ahmed, Sahil, Pakistan (hopefully). Zahid Shahab Ahmed is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team and Research Team. He is a researcher in our upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. The title of his project is Refugees in South Asia and Humiliation.
Zahid Shahab Ahmed kindly proposes as one of the Round Table topics: "Humiliation and Child Sexual Abuse"
He writes (26th April 2005): Thanks for being so encouraging and thanks for remind all of us about the meeting in Germany. While working in the area of child rights in Pakistan I would like to share the findings of my researches on male prostitution and child sexual abuse from Pakistan with the other members of HDHS. I hope this sharing would be add to their knowledge. Further, I hope that this meeting would be learning exposure for me.

•  Carlos E. Sluzki, Professor, George Mason University, Washington, USA (hopefully). Carlos E. Sluzki is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Please see here Elements of Humiliation-Shame Dynamics for Computational Modeling and Analysis of Real-Life Scenarios, draft of presentation at the Workshop on Humilliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, November 18-19, 2004.
Please see also:
The Story of the Crying Composer
, told at the Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, NY, 2004,
and:
Humiliation Therapeutics (powerpoint presentation), developed at the Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, NY, 2004.

•  Adair Linn Nagata, Professor, Rikkyo University, Tokyo (hopefully). Adair Linn Nagata is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.

•  Kiyoko Sueda, Professor, Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo (hopefully). Kiyoko Sueda is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.

•  Ingeborg Breines, Director, UNESCO Liaison Office, Representative to the United Nations Organization in Geneva and the Specialized Agencies.
Ingeborg Breines is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Ingeborg kindly writes (21st June 2005): I will try to be with you in Berlin in one of the meetings!

•  Arran Stibbe, Teaching Critical Discourse Analysis at the University of Gloucestershire, UK (hopefully). Arran Stibbe is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Board. He is also the Director of our Dignity Beyond the Human World Project.

•  Eric Marcus, The Marcus Group, NY (hopefully). Eric Marcus is interested in HumanDHS's work.

•  Roberta Kosberg, Professor, Curry College, USA (hopefully). Roberta Kosberg is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team.

•  Shanti Gylseth, Oslo University (hopefully).

•  Dharm P. S. Bhawuk, Professor, University of Hawaii, USA.
Dharm Bhawuk is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and Global Core Team. He is the Director of our World Films for Equal Dignity Project.
Bhawuk kindly writes (in several messages in April 2005) and reminds us of the importance of thinking through theory, method, and practice of humiliation research prior to our meeting so as to decide which focus it should have. "Theory, Method, and Practice of Humiliation Research" could be both a topic for a Round Table, and/or for our Open Space, since this is imporant to all of us.
Dharm Bhawuk kindly writes on 2nd August 2005, that he and his wive Poonam send everybody their kindest wishes regret very much that they cannot join us this year.


 

Papers

All participants were warmly invited to send in their papers. Victoria C. Fontan has kindly taken upon her the task to develop an edited book (with the help of Linda Hartling, Arie Nadler, and Evelin Lindner) starting with the contributions of the participants of our Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict in 2004. Please see Violent Conflict and Humiliation.

Please see further down the papers/notes that participants sent in prior to the workshop so that everybody could get acquainted with all others beforehand. (Please see the papers/notes for our 2004 NY meeting.)

Please ask the authors for their authorisation if you wish to quote them!

Charlotte Brenk (2005)
Humiliation in Intercultural Relations
Anregungen und Gedanken zur Konferenz vom Samstag, dem 17.9.2005
These reflections were kindly sent in by Charlotte Brenk subsequent to our Public Event.

Linda Hartling (2005)
Humiliation and Assistance: Telling the Truth About Power, Telling a New Story
Paper prepared for "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.

Mari Otterlei Blikom (2005)
Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People
Note prepared for "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.

Thomas Clough Daffern (2005)
Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People
Paper prepared for "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.

Miriam H. Marton (2005)
Terrorism and Humiliation
Note prepared for Round Table "Terrorism and Humiliation" in "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.

Miriam H. Marton (2005)
Humiliation in the Home: Survivors of Childhood Rape in the United States
Note prepared for Round Table "Humiliation/Dignity in the Family and Workplace" in "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.

Ana Ljubinkovic (2005)
Milk and Urine: Intentional Humiliation as a part of Humanitarian Assistance
Note prepared for "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.

Samir Sanad Basta (2005)
Assistance, Dignity and Humiliation
Paper prepared for "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.

Pandora Hopkins (2005)
House of Cards and the Use of Shame and Stigma as Strategy: A Folklore Study of an Elite Group
Paper prepared for "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.

Emmanuel Ndahimana (2005)
Ignorance and Humiliation
Paper prepared for "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.
See a response by Laurien Ntezimana, Pour Eradiquer l'Humiliation.

Zinthiya Ganeshpanchan (2005)
Domestic and Gender based Violence among Refugees and Internally Displaced Women
Paper prepared for "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in them Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.

Evelin Lindner (2004)
Humiliation in a Globalizing World: Does Humiliation Become the Most Disruptive Force? (2004)
See the same text here, as short summary, and longer paper (not to be cited without author's authorization).