Global Dignity & Humiliation Mapping and Assessment Team

Please see our sessions on Dignity & Humiliation Assessment so far, at our 2006 and 2007 Workshops on Humiliation and Violent Conflict in New York, and our 2008 Conference in Norway.

The assessment branch of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) aims at encouraging research related to assessing and measuring dignity and humiliation. We wish to contribute to the capacity of people to build peaceful societies and be mindful of how humiliation may disrupt the social fabric, and how social cohesion may be sustained by preventing humiliation from occurring. You are invited to develop ideas and projects that aim at dignifying our world, and preventing and healing humiliation. We wish to harness and nurture everybody's expertise for our HumanDHS research activities, create cross-fertilization and synergy, and hope that our efforts will grow organically from our discussions and meetings!

We are looking for a Coordinator/Director for our Global Dignity & Humiliation Assessment Team (please note that our HumanDHS definition of a coordinator is different as compared to mainstream definitions - please read more here).


LINDA M. HARTLING
Linda M. Hartling, Ph.D., is the HumanDHS Director, and also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, HumanDHS Global Core Team, HumanDHS Global Coordinating Team, and the HumanDHS Education Team. She is furthermore the Editor of the Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (JHDHS).
Linda is affiliated with the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMTI) at the Stone Center, which is part of the Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College in Massachusetts. Until 2008, she was its the Associate Director. Dr. Hartling is a member of the JBMTI theory-building group advancing the practice of the Relational-Cultural Theory, a model of psychological growth and development. She coordinates and contributes to training programs, publications, and special projects for the JBMTI. She holds a doctoral degree in clinical/community psychology and has published papers on resilience, substance abuse prevention, shame and humiliation, relational practice in the workplace, and Relational-Cultural Theory. Dr. Hartling was co-editor of The Complexity of Connection: Writings from the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute at the Stone Center (2004) and author of the Humiliation Inventory, a scale to assess the internal experience of derision and degradation. She is currently a member of an international team establishing the first Center for Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies.
   

EMANUELA DEL RE, Senior Advisor
Emanuela C. Del Re (1963) is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, and the HumanDHS Research Team.
She is an Italian scholar specialized in geopolitics and security issues, who has been working on "terrorism" and in particular "religious terrorism" in the last few years focusing on the issue of "terrorists' profiling". Her interest in the link between security and religious issues dates back to the 1980s when she started carrying out long field researches in the field in New Religious Movements (in Europe, South Africa and in the Balkans). [read more]
Measuring-related expertise:
•  International surveys, theory of science, stringent quality control of methodology
   

VEGAR JORDANGER, Senior Advisor
Vegar Jordanger is also a Member of the HumanDHS Research Team.
He is a Doctorate Student at the Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim, and a peace researcher and practitioner. The title of his project is Humiliation, Violence, and Terror in War-Torn Chechnya and North Caucasus. [read more]
Measuring-related expertise:
•  International surveys, theory of science, stringent quality control of methodology
   

ARYE RATTNER, Senior Advisor
Professor Arye Rattner is the Director of the Center for the Study of Crime Law & Society, University of Haifa, Israel.
Measuring-related expertise:
•  International surveys
   
DOV COHEN, Senior Advisor
Dov Cohen is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
He graduated with a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan and has taught at the University of Illinois and at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. His general research interests have to do with cultural continuity and change and the impact of social norms. Specific areas of research have examined violence, honor, relationship issues, and perspectives on the self, individualism and collectivism, and cultural influences on memory.
Professor Cohen has published on topics such as honor and violence, see for example, Culture of Honor: The Psychology of Violence in the South (Westview Press, 1996, co-authored with Richard E. Nisbett). [read more]
Measuring-related expertise:
•  Controlled experiments measuring honor
   
LEE ROSS, Senior Advisor
Lee Ross is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
He has been a Professor of Psychology at Stanford University for over 30 years and is currently teaching courses in the application of social psychology, as well as in bargaining, negotiation, and conflict resolution. He is also a Principal Investigator (and Co-Founder) of the Stanford Center on Conflict and Negotiation. The author or editor of four books, including Human Inference, and the Person and Situation, both co-authored by Richard Nisbett, and almost 100 papers and chapters, he was elected in 1994 to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and was named the American Psychological Association William James Fellow in 2003. [read more]
Measuring-related expertise:
•  Variety of methods, for example, the use of scenarios
   
MAGGIE O'NEILL, Senior Advisor
Maggie O'Neill is also a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, the HumanDHs Global Core Team, the HumanDHS Research Team, the HumanDHS Education Team, where she is part of the core HumanDHS Research Management Team. Maggie is particularly an Academic Advisor to our upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. She is furthermore a Member of the Academic Board of the Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (JHDHS).
Maggie is based in Criminology and Social Policy at Loughborough University. [...] She co-edited Sociology (with Tony Spybey): the journal of the British Sociological Association from 1999-2002; she is a member of various professional associations including the National Network of Sex Work Projects and the British Sociological Association and British Criminology Association. [read more]
Measuring-related expertise:
•  Maggie's theoretical concept of ethno-mimesis (the inter-connection of sensitive ethnographic work and visual re-presentations) is a methodological tool as well as a process for exploring lived experience, displacement, exile, belonging and humiliation.
   
ANDREA BARTOLI and TED PERLMUTTER, Senior Advisors
Andrea Bartoli is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
He holds the Drucie French Cumbie Chair at the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution (ICAR) at George Mason University in Washington, USA. He is also a Senior Research Scholar at the School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), at Columbia University in New York, the former Director of the Center for International Conflict Resolution (CICR), as well as the former Chairman of the Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN). He works on regional conflict resolution in Southern Africa, the role of religions in conflict resolution, and learning organization in the field of conflict resolution.
His recent publications include Somalia, Rwanda and Beyond: The Role of the International Media in Wars and Humanitarian Crises (co-edited with Edward Girardet and Jeffrey Carmel).
Andrea Bartoli has a B.A. from the University of Rome, Italy and a Ph.D. from the University of Milan, Italy. Trained as an anthropologist, Bartoli has been actively involved in conflict resolution since the early 1980s, particularly in Mozambique, the Sudan, Burundi, and Angola. [read more]
Measuring-related expertise:
•  International surveys assessing the pre-conditions of genocide
   
PETER T. COLEMAN, Senior Advisor
Peter T. Coleman is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, and the HumanDHS Research Team.
Peter T. Coleman is the Director of ICCCR and Assistant Professor of Psychology and Education. He holds a Ph.D. and M.Phil. in Social / Organizational Psychology from Teachers College, Columbia University and a B.A. in Communications from the University of Iowa. He has conducted research on social entitivity processes (ingroup/outgroup formation), gender discrimination in organizations, the mediation of inter-ethnic conflict, ripeness in intractable conflict, conflict resolution & difference, and on the conditions which foster the constructive use of social power. [read more]
Measuring-related expertise:
•  Variety of methodological approaches
   
DANIEL L. SHAPIRO
Daniel L. Shapiro, Ph.D., is also a Member of the HumanDHS Education Team, and Senior Advisor of the Public Policy project.
He is the Associate Director of the Harvard Negotiation Project at Harvard Law School. He is on the faculty of Harvard Law School and Harvard Medical School's Department of Psychiatry. Trained in clinical psychology, his research and teaching focus primarily on the role of emotions in negotiation and international conflict management. [read more]
Measuring-related expertise:
•  Public Policy
   
  SABINA ALKIRE, Senior Advisor
Director, Oxford Poverty & Human Development Initiative (OPHI), Department of International Development, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
Measuring-related expertise:
•  Shortlisted Indicators on Humiliation, and a Note Explaining Research Interests and Progress to Date at OPHI, contribution presented at the 2007 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 13-14, 2007 (see also a Paper on Shame and Humiliation (2007) by Diego Zavaleta Reyles).
   

FINN TSCHUDI, Senior Advisor
Finn Tschudi is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, and the HumanDHS Research Team.
Finn has spent most of his professional life - 37 years - at the Institute of Psychology, University of Oslo, Norway. He has broad interests in psychology and has been teaching and publishing in cognitive, social, personality and clinical psychology. While well known for his contageous enthusiasm when teaching he was eager for a change and took an early retirement from his position as professor of psychology from January 1999. [read more]
Measuring-related expertise:
•  Theory of science
   
FLOYD WEBSTER RUDMIN, Senior Advisor
Floyd Webster Rudmin is Co-Director and Co-Coordinator of the HumanDHS Stop Hazing and Bullying Project and the HumanDHS World Gender Relations for Equal Dignity Project, as well as the HumanDHS Apology Project. He is also a member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team, the HumanDHS Advisory Board, and the HumanDHS Research Team.
Floyd Webster Rudmin, Ph.D., is a Professor of Social and Community Psychology at the University of Tromsø in Norway. He earned his B.A. in Philosophy in Bowdoin College, his M.A. in Audiology in SUNY, Buffalo, his M.A. in Psychology at Queen's University, Canada, and his Ph.D. in Psychology from Queen's University, Canada. His research interests include cognitive history (psychology of historical beliefs), psychology of ownership, cross-cultural psychology, statistical methods, peace research, and history of psychology. [read more]
Measuring-related expertise:
•  Theory of science, stringent quality control of methodology
•  Preventing Inadvertent Humiliation (2006)
•  Six Research Designs on Humiliation (2005)
   
HROAR KLEMPE & TORBJØRN RUNDMO, Senior Advisors
Hroar Klempe is the Dean of the Department of Psychology at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim. He is a former Professor in Musicology and Associate Professor in Social Psychology at the Department of Psychology.
His fields of interest within psychology are communication, media, music, education, and epistemology. His current research projects address music and mass media, as well as education and resistance to learning. Furthermore, Hroar is interested in the theme of civil obedience. He has worked on national and international campaigns on conscious objection to military services. [read more]
Measuring-related expertise:
•  The Reliability and Validity of a Measurement Instrument of Culture Defined As Symbol Exchange (2007)
Contribution presented at the 2007 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 13-14, 2007, as Power Point presentation and as Pdf file.
   
PATRICIA RODRIGUEZ MOSQUERA, Senior Advisor
Patricia Rodriguez Mosquera is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team, and the HumanDHS Research Team, where she is part of the core HumanDHS Research Management Team.
Patricia is currently Assistant Professor at the School of Social Sciences and Law, Brunel University, UK. Patricia studied psychology at the Autónoma University of Madrid (Spain) and the University of Amsterdam (UvA, The Netherlands). She obtained her Ph.D. from the University of Amsterdam in 1999. [read more]
Measuring-related expertise:
•  Factor analysis
   
MICHAEL B. GREENE, Senior Advisor
Michael B. Greene is a Senior Project Director at Rutgers University Center for Applied Psychology, a consultant for The Nicholson Foundation, and sole proprietor of Greene Consulting. Dr. Greene received his academic training in developmental psychology at Columbia University. He previously established two centers for the study and prevention of violence: the Center for the Prevention of Violence at Youth Consultation Service and the Violence Institute of New Jersey at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. [read more]
Measuring-related expertise:
•  Theory of science, stringent quality control of methodology
   

LELAND R. BEAUMONT, Senior Advisor
Lee is the Founding Manager of the Emotional Competency website. The Emotional Competency website helps people explore the logic of passion. The site is dedicated developing the essential social skills to recognize, interpret, and respond constructively to emotions in yourself and others. These are essential skills for promoting dignity. It features an in-depth description and discussion of twenty-four distinct emotions.
Emotion competency is an important skill that can provide several benefits throughout many aspects of your life. It can increase your satisfaction with relationships while it increases your gratification and contentment with the many interpersonal events in your life. It can give you greater insight and help you better understand the motives and actions of yourself and others. You can begin to free yourself from anger, hate, resentment, vengeance, and other destructive emotions that cause hurt and pain. You can feel relief and enjoy greater peace-of-mind, autonomy, intimacy, dignity, and wisdom as you engage more deeply with others. Increasing your tolerance and compassion can lead to an authentic optimism and a well-founded confidence, based on your better understanding and interpretation of what-is.
The website is accessible, comprehensive, and carefully researched. Clearly written in plain English, it covers each topic fully and identifies the extensive and authoritative references relied on to ensure accuracy and encourage further study.
The site includes a study guide that provides a well-organized path through the material to aid self-study.
The site also features:
•  A guide to recognizing emotions
•  A guide to the core human concepts that trigger our emotions
•  A description of the survival value of each emotion.
Measuring-related expertise:
•  Metrics - A Practical Example, and Thoughts on a Measurements Plan (2007), contribution presented at the 2007 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 13-14, 2007.
•  Humiliation Index Ideas, contribution presented at the Global Dignity & Humiliation Assessment Initiative, 2008.
•  Assessing Humiliation: Ideas and an Approach (2008)
Proposals developed over the past year for the Twelfth Annual HumanDHS Conference
See also as Powerpoint file.
•  On May 23, 2009, Lee Beaumont wrote: "I am intrigued by the recent release of Wolfram Alpha. See www.wolframalpha.com/. It is a powerful and innovative tool for marshalling data to solve problems. Perhaps you will be interested in my recent article proposing Wolfram Alpha be put to work measuring human rights. See: http://emotionalcompetency.blogspot.com/2009/05/measuring-human-rights-with-wolfram.html." Brian Ward responds: "To gain accurate data that can be compared between societies, cultures or countries could be difficult. Many people don’t have the knowledge to answer the questions and many people wouldn’t answer out of fear or answer incorrectly. Governments could not be relied on to answer correctly on behalf of people. Maybe we need ‘Hans Blix’ type of people to gather the information. Possibly they would be denied access to the areas of greatest need. www.visionofhumanity.org/gpi/about-gpi/methodology.php is a link to the Global Peace Index study – Maybe peace measured this way has a correlation to extent of humiliation."
• New courses 2016:
- Living Wisely
- Envisioning our Future
- Envisioning Our Future: The World We Want in 2075
- Living the Golden Rule

   

JENNIFER S. GOLDMAN, Senior Advisor
Jennifer S. Goldman is also a Member of the HumanDHS Research Team, and HumanDHS Global Core Team.
Jennifer Goldman earned her Ph.D. in 2007 in Social-Organizational Psychology at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her dissertation The Differential Effects of Collective-level vs. Personal-level Humiliating Experiences focuses on the role that humiliation plays in exacerbating violent social conflict. She is also a Graduate Research Fellow with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. [read more]
Measuring-related expertise:
•  Variety of methods, for example, the use of scenarios
•  The Differential Effects of Collective-level vs. Personal-level Humiliating Experiences, Doctoral dissertation in Social-Organizational Psychology at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, focusing on the role that humiliation plays in exacerbating violent social conflict.

   

SALMAN TÜRKEN, Senior Advisor
Salman Türken is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team, the HumanDHS Education Team, and of the HumanDHS Research Team.
Defining himself as a cosmopolitan, Salman is interested in studies of all levels of analysis that influence and change both individuals and societies in this globalization era. Influenced by critical social psychology, ideology - understood as common sense, as legitimizing and reproducing unequal power relations which might also lead to humiliation in intergroup relations - is now the main research topic for him. [read more]
Measuring-related expertise:
•  International surveys, theory of science, stringent quality control of methodology

   

SOPHIE SCHAARSCHMIDT, Doctoral Researcher
Sophie Schaarschmidt is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team, the HumanDHS Education Team, and of the HumanDHS Research Team.
She was born nearby Dresden, Germany, 27 years ago. She has lived and studied in several countries, including Great Britain, Netherlands and Malta. She is a doctorate student of psychology working at the "FernUniversität" in Hagen, Germany (a distance learning university). [read more]
Measuring-related expertise:
•  Contribution presented at the 2007 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 13-14, 2007.
   

LONE ALICE JOHANSEN, Researcher
Lone Alice Johansen is also a Member of the HumanDHS Research Team.
She is currently working on her master thesis on African conflict resolution traditions (ubuntu) effect on perceived humiliation. She wants to investigate how the humiliation that is connected to being part of an ethnic/cultural group in conflict can be reduced by using ubuntu. To explore Ubuntu's effect on perceived humiliation she is going to do an empirical study at a dialogue/conflict resolution seminar in Norway. [read more]
Measuring-related expertise:
•  Interviews, African Solutions to African Intergroup Conflicts: Ubuntu and Humiliation - A Study of Ubuntu and Its Effect on Perceived Humiliation in a Interactive Track Two Dialogue Seminar (2007)
   
MICHAEL SAYLER, Senior Advisor
Michael Sayler is a minister in Colorado Springs, Colorado. His dissertation at the Fielding Graduate Institute is entitled Humiliation and the Poor: A Study in the Management of Meaning (Ph.D. dissertation, Fielding Graduate Institute, 2004, available through the University of Michigan dissertation service), a study of how homeless people (in an affluent society) manage the meaning of humiliating experiences. [read more]
Measuring-related expertise:
•  Tracking Humiliation with CMM (2007), contribution presented at the 2007 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 13-14, 2007.
   

WILLIAM MCCONOCHIE, Senior Advisor
Bill is a psychologist in private practice in Eugene, Or. He holds three degrees and a post doc in psychology (clinical) and has practiced in school, clinical, industrial/organizational and political psychology, his most recent focus. He has conducted numerous studies of traits related to political behavior and the relationships between them and has formed a non-profit corporation to continue these, hopefully with grant support. He has developed measures of more than twenty scales for measuring traits such as religious fundamentalism, kindly religious beliefs, human rights endorsement, warmongering and warmongering-proneness, violence-proneness, and political lying and conniving and is working on measures of pro-social and antisocial social/political activism, as he's noticed that some "peace" advocates seem to be rather hostile, anti-social people.  He has designed an empirically based model for a political party promoting the common good. His research findings are published at his web site, Politicalpsychologyresearch.com.  He is a member of APA, Psychologists for Social Responsibility, the Society of Organizational and Industrial Psychologists and the International Society of Political Psychology and recently has presented papers at their conventions.
Measuring-related expertise:
•  Web-based questionnaire
•  Bill asks everybody to support him in his research! He writes (July 9, 2009):
"Help with humiliation research. Please consider helping with a research project to measure humiliation as a psychological trait. This study measures many other traits as well. It is designed to reveal much about the origins of humiliation and the effects humiliation has on adult behavior. You will immediately receive you scores on many traits measured. The final study report will be published online after 100 persons have completed the questionnaire. It is 181 items long and takes about 30 or 40 minutes to complete. Go to Politicalpsychologyresearch.com, click on the Help Do Research button on the top of the home page. Register and log in. Scroll down to study 8, "Brief Humiliation Study" and enter your responses. You don't have to do it all at one time. If you find this one fun, do study # 9 too, as it also will tell us more about humiliation. If you are a professor and want to involve a whole class of students, you can contact Dr. Bill McConochie to get a group code. This will enable you to download the data file for your class and receive the names of all who participate, to give them class credit. Bill is at Bill [@] Politicalpsychologyresearch.com."
   


PAMELA M. CREED, Doctoral Researcher
Pamela M. Creed is also a Member of the HumanDHS Research Team.
Pamela M Creed earned a doctorate from the Institute of Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University in Arlington, Virginia. Her dissertation explored narrative connections between macro and micro levels. In particular, it examined the relationship of culture, emotion and agency in the dramatic construction, mobilization and acceptance of an American war narrative and later of individual counter narratives... She currently resides in Belgrade. [read more]
Measuring-related expertise:
•  Discourse analysis, please see The Dominant American Narrative between 9/11/01 and the Invasion of Iraq, an introduction to Pamela's dissertation which aims to analyze the dominant American narrative between 9/11/01 and the invasion of Iraq through positioning theory and the literature on humiliation and conflict.
   

larsen
NOORIT LARSEN
Noorit Larsen is also a Member in the HumanDHS Global Core Coordinating Team and HumanDHS Global Core Team.
has graduated with an LLB degree from the University of Haifa, Israel. During her bachelor degree she developed a growing interest in human rights and related disciplines, as well as took part in the ‘human rights in society’ legal clinic. After finishing her bachelor degree she moved to Norway to live with her husband who is Norwegian. She has recently graduated with a master's degree in Medical Law and Ethics Programme from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. Among her areas of interest and research expertise are: human rights, medical law, international healthcare law, distribution of natural resources, public international law, international criminal justice, jurisprudence and law and development. She hopes to do her Ph.D. in Norway in the latter subject; she believes the reciprocal relations between international law and international development are not only interesting and fruitful but from her perspective – inevitable as well. She also believes there is research in a relatively small scale in the area of law and development.
   
EVELIN G. LINDNER, Supporter
Evelin Gerda Lindner is the Founding President of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network and initiator of the World Dignity University initiative. She is a transdisciplinary social scientist and humanist and holds two Ph.D.s, one in medicine and one in psychology. In 1996, she designed a research project on the concept of humiliation and its role in genocide and war. German history served as starting point. [read more]
Measuring-related expertise:
•  Preparation and Method, in Lindner, Evelin G. (2000), The Psychology of Humiliation: Somalia, Rwanda / Burundi, and Hitler's Germany. Oslo: University of Oslo, Department of Psychology, Doctoral Dissertation in Psychology, pp. 103-131.
•  How Research Can Humiliate: Critical Reflections on Method, in Journal for the Study of Peace and Conflict, Annual Edition 2001-2002, pp. 16-36.
   
  New members:
Ana Kafka
Silje Rivelsrud
James Westaby
David Mandel (Country Index)?
Laurie Fenstermacher (large-scale modelling)?